Participants

Adnane Baddouh Adnane Baddouh
Doctoral student in applied economics

In progress


Table ronde : Will AI invent the jobs of tomorrow?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 9h15

The current trend in university and vocational training programs is to expand disciplines and adjust student quotas according to employment forecasts. This pragmatism is certainly legitimate from the point of view of the needs of the economy and the supply of jobs for new entrants to the labour market. However, is it prudent in relation to the importance of fundamental research in the development of knowledge and its applications in societies that are evolving more and more rapidly? Can AI anticipate the upheavals in social behaviors that are constantly changing demand? Can it predict the emergence of new jobs and the disappearance of others? Can it invent a future? Can it make it inevitable?

Alain Lavoie Alain Lavoie
CEO

For over 25 years, Alain Lavoie has been a leader in the information technology ecosystem. He is an expert in the world of digital transformation, information management and automatic natural language processing.Alain Lavoie co-founded Irosoft, whose expertise is based on language understanding, automatic natural language processing (NLP/ALT) and modern machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, enabling his clients mainly in the legal world to transform simple information into useful data that can be easily exploited. In 2019 Alain Lavoie co-founded the start-up LexRock AI. LexRock AI is a platform using artificial intelligence, allowing the analysis, extraction and comparison of information from unstructured documents, intended for different sectors of activity such as finance, insurance, legal and cybersecurity. Alain has also been very active in the ICT ecosystem in Quebec for almost 20 years. He is currently involved with FORUM IA Québec (CA), IVADO (Codir), MILA (startup committee), PINQ (CA), UdeM (CTIC), FCCQ (CA and CTIC) and Groupe 3737 (CA). He is mainly known for defending the interests of SMEs in information technology while promoting the ICT field. He is involved as a speaker in order to raise awareness and democratize artificial intelligence.


Conference : How can we land AI in businesses?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 15h15 - 16h — Amphi rouge

According to a recent study unveiled by Forum IA Québec, Quebec ranks 7th in the world for AI. This is great news! The benefits of AI are no longer in doubt. We must now ensure that this AI can be transferred to our businesses. This conference is for both industry and academia. We will discuss the issues related to the adoption of artificial intelligence and the solutions to get there. We will also focus on the relationship between academia and industry in the context of managing expectations and results. This is a very high level reflection that our speaker will share on the adoption of AI by our companies in a context of technology transfer of artificial intelligence to businesses.

Alain Tapp Alain Tapp
Professor of Computer Science and Operations Research

Alain Tapp is a full professor at the University of Montreal in the Department of Computer Science and Operations Research. He began his career working on fundamental aspects of cryptography, computability, and quantum physics. Over time, his playful passion for artificial intelligence led him to make a decisive change of direction. Thanks to the very generous support he received from MILA, he has been able to devote himself fully to this exploding field for the past few years. He is interested in the fundamental aspects, but also in the links that exist between cognitive psychology, linguistics and artificial intelligence.


Conference : Experts, robots and formulas, who should we listen to?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 11h30 - 12h15 — Amphi orange

The border between data science, Big data, machine learning and artificial intelligence is quite blurred. A large amount of concepts are present in all these fields in a more or less sophisticated form. With the tools that have existed for a long time and the advent of the new techniques of deep learning, it is possible to develop algorithms whose purpose is to produce judgments, decisions or evaluations. In this respect, it is a question of supporting or replacing the work of the expert. Science has made a lot of progress in these fields and a number of indisputable results diverge greatly from popular perception and received ideas. I will present the characteristics of decision-making approaches, highlighting the difference between experts, artificial intelligence, and the simple use of statistical or actuarial techniques. A comprehensive and serious study of these fields quickly confronts us with disturbing, even shocking, results. My goal is to present the important elements that I believe are essential for anyone concerned with rational decision making in their institution.

Alan Melby Alan Melby
Professor Emeritus of Linguistics

Alan Melby is Professor Emeritus of Linguistics at Brigham Young University. His career in translation started in 1970. After working on a machine translation project for a decade, beginning in 1980, he studied human translation and became a certified French-to-English translator. He is currently vice-president of FIT, the International Federation of Translators, and president of LTAC Global, a small non-profit organization that serves the language industry. His translation-related research has included creating tools for human translators, promoting interoperability among tools, and the development of translation-related standards within ISO and ASTM International. He has been awarded the Wüster prize for lifetime achievement in the field of terminology by TermNet, the Gode medal for service to the profession by the American Translators Association, and an achievement award in the area of translation technology by Asling.


Conference : Which side will win? No-cost machine translation, based on AI, or paid human translation?
Friday 6 may 2022, 12h15 - 13h — Amphi mauve

There is a debate concerning the coexistence of machine translation that is free or nearly free (Google Translate, for example), based on Artificial Intelligence, that makes it all the way to the consumer without any human intervention, on the one hand, and paid human translation produced with or without computer tools, on the other. Is this coexistence sustainable? Or will human translation soon disappear?

Alex Shee Alex Shee
Strategy director

Alex is an executive at Sama that leads Corporate Development and Strategy. He is working on building an AI business ecosystem around Sama's platform. His role encompasses Partnerships, Corporate Development and Go-To-Market strategy. He was previously the Head of Partnerships and Corporate Development at Element AI (exited to ServiceNow | NYSE: NOW) where he opened and grew the business in Asia, signed major strategic partnerships and led the team that raised Element AI's C$200M Series B. He was also the host of Element AI's #1 rated podcast "The AI Element" which explores the biggest issues and toughest questions in artificial intelligence. He was also recently selected as one of top 250 upcoming leaders in Canada by the Governor General of Canada (equivalent of Presidential Award), one of the top 4 business development and sales leaders in tech by Floodgates in their Annual Anchor List and 2021 "Power Player" by The Peak.


Conference : Does artificial intelligence help fight poverty?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 11h30 - 12h15 — Amphi rouge

AI for Good is a much talked about term...However, there are few examples of when AI has been able to have a concrete impact in the developing world or poverty alleviation. In his talk, Alex Shee will explore trends that are taking place in AI businesses to help create a positive and tangible impact on poverty. He will challenge preconceived ideas around the successful deployment of AI as well as the business models underlying them. He will outline a vision for how AI can be harnessed to achieve UN Sustainability goals.

Alexandre Blais Alexandre Blais
Scientific Director

Alexandre Blais is a professor of physics at the Université de Sherbrooke where he is the scientific director of the Quantum Institute. He holds a Chair in Quantum Computer Architectures and his theoretical research focuses on superconducting quantum circuits for quantum information processing. He is a pioneer of the field of circuit quantum electrodynamics, which is now considered one of the most promising approaches for the realization of a quantum computer. Professor Blais is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, a Fellow of CIFAR, and a Fellow of the American Physical Society. His research contributions have earned him the Steacie Prize of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), the Herzberg and Brockhouse Medals of the Canadian Association of Physicists, the Urgel-Archambault Prize of the Association francophone pour le savoir, the Rutherford Memorial Medal of the Royal Society of Canada, and a Guggenheim Fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.


Conference : When will the quantum computer for AI?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 16h - 16h45 — Amphi bleu

Quantum computers could efficiently compete computations which would take billions of years with today’s fastest supercomputers. For some problems, the speedup offered by quantum computers is more modest. For others, there is no speedup at all. Understanding the real-world quantum acceleration which can be expected from future quantum computers remains an open question. We don’t know everything yet, and answering this question is made more difficult by the fact that we don’t have fully functional quantum computers. However, the fundamental research and technological development towards the realization of these computers are accelerating at a phenomenal pace. In the last few years only, we have already gone from very rudimentary devices to small quantum computers on the cloud. In this talk, I will present the recent advances in quantum computer architectures and discuss some of the challenges that lay ahead. I will discuss how AI can be used in the development of quantum technologies, and touch upon the topic of whether the computational power of quantum computers could present an advantage for machine learning.

Alexei Grinbaum Alexei Grinbaum
Philosopher and physicist

Alexei Grinbaum, Ph.D., HDR, is a physicist and philosopher at LARSIM, the Philosophy of Science Group at CEA-Saclay near Paris. His main interest is in the foundations of quantum theory. He also writes on the ethical and social aspects of emerging technologies, including nanotechnology, synthetic biology, robotics and artificial intelligence. He was coordinator for France of the "European Observatory of Nanotechnologies" and partner in the project “Responsible Research and Innovation in Practice”. Grinbaum is a member of the French national ethics committee for digital technologies and AI as well as of the French ethics commission for research in information technology (Cerna). His books include "Mécanique des étreintes" (2014) and "Les robots et le mal" (2019).


Conference : Does the inhumanity of artificial intelligence do man any good?
Friday 6 may 2022, 10h - 10h45 — Amphi rouge

We benefit from unprecedented possibilities thanks to artificial intelligence. Its applications are numerous: search engines, image and speech recognition, automatic translation, conversational agents, etc. They are beginning to emerge in sectors such as health, energy, transport, education, commerce and finance. But with them come new dangers. Domestic robots become informers, conversational agents insult their interlocutors: computer systems participate in human conflicts and sometimes even provoke them. Who is responsible? The answer to this question is one of the most urgent challenges in our relationship with digital technologies. But it is not about how to make artificial intelligence benevolent. It is about making sure that it does not replace humans as moral agents.


Signing : Les robots et le mal
Friday 6 may 2022, 10h45 - 11h30

Allison Cohen Allison Cohen
Applied AI Projects Lead

Allison Cohen is the Applied AI Projects Lead at Mila. In this role, Allison works closely with AI researchers, collaborators and funding partners to professionalize socially beneficial AI projects and deploy them at scale. Currently, her portfolio of projects includes a de-biasing application and a tool to support police in their human trafficking investigations. Allison is also involved with the Global Partnership on Artificial Intelligence (GPAI), an international organization tasked with developing global best practices on AI. Within GPAI, Allison works with the Drug Discovery Committee on a series of policy recommendations designed to catalyze an AI-enabled R&D process that produces drugs that are equitably distributed and better aligned with healthcare outcomes. Allison holds a BA in International Development from McGill University and an MA in Global Affairs from the University of Toronto.


Conference : Why take a unidimensional approach to tools that exist in high dimensional space?
Friday 6 may 2022, 11h30 - 12h15 — Amphi orange

There is a problematic and yet ubiquitous phenomena in the field of AI research and product development: we’re too late to ask ourselves whether the algorithms we’ve been developing are built for purpose. Why? Because we’ve been misinterpreting “fit for purpose” to mean technically feasible. This definition obscures considerations of equal importance including the cultural, social, political and legal landscape that permeate the tool’s design and determine the tool’s utility. When building AI products, researchers are only confronted with questions of multidisciplinary reflection as they’re about to submit a paper or launch their tool. However, at this point in the project, a host of relevant decisions have already been made, whether consciously or not, that influence the algorithms’ utility. These decisions begin before the algorithm has ever been trained or the data has ever been collected. In this talk, I will discuss important points of inflection that are too often missed in the product development lifecycle. These inflection points present opportunities for AI researchers and product developers to ensure that the technology they’re building is fit for purpose

Amal El Fallah Seghrouchni Amal El Fallah Seghrouchni
Director of the International Center mouvement AI

Mrs. Amal El Fallah Seghrouchni is Director of the International Center of Artificial Intelligence of Morocco, Ai movement within the Mohammed VI Polytechnic University. She is exceptional class professor at the Sorbonne University, Faculty of Sciences and Engineering. She holds a Ph.D in computer science from the University Pierre et Marie Curie and a Habilitation to advise Research in Artificial Intelligence. Worldwide expert in Distributed Artificial Intelligence and Multi-Agent Systems, she was elected General Chair of the Best International Conference in the field (AAMAS 2020, Auckland - New Zealand) among others. She has initiated numerous research projects and developed sustained international collaborations with National Institute of Informatics in Tokyo in Japan and European universities. She has directed 33 Doctorates at Paris, published 24 books including proceedings from international conferences, over 200 papers and articles. Prof. Amal El Fallah Seghrouchni is passionate about ethical issues of emerging technologies, social issues related to ethics, gender, inclusion and social justice. She is a member of the World Commission on the Ethics of Scientific Knowledge and Technology of UNESCO (COMEST) and was nominated for the Berkeley World Business Analytics Awards, in the category "Woman of the Year" - 2021 for the African continent.

Ana Inés Ansaldo Ana Inés Ansaldo
Researcher in biomedical sciences

Professor Ana Inés Ansaldo is a full professor at the School of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Montreal. She is the director of the Brain Plasticity, Communication and Aging Laboratory at the Research Centre of the Geriatric University Institute of Montreal. D. in Biomedical Sciences and a member of the World Federation of Neurology and the Academy of Aphasia, she directs two research platforms funded by the Canada Foundation for Innovation aimed at developing interventions for adult populations with neurological communication disorders and their natural and professional caregivers. His work is at the crossroads of human communication neuroscience, neurolinguistics and clinical approaches; it encompasses the neurofunctional, behavioural and social levels of communication and its disorders following various neurological diseases. Focusing on different dimensions of human communication, his cross-sectoral team develops digital tools including the use of artificial intelligence, customizable and evidence-based, for assessment, clinical decision making, rehabilitation and support of people with the disease and their caregivers.


Conference : Can AI help support communication between people with dementia and their caregivers?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 13h45 - 14h30 — Amphi orange

Worldwide, approximately 55 million people have dementia, with more than 60% living in middle- and low-income countries. Given the overall aging of the population, these numbers will increase significantly in the coming decades. There is no cure for dementia yet. It is known that supporting communication between people living with dementia and their caregivers is key to optimizing their quality of life and social inclusion. However, at the present time, very few human and financial resources are invested in developing tools adapted to these purposes. Can we aspire to a synergy between human expertise and artificial intelligence to promote the social inclusion of people with dementia through adapted communication tools? This conference will focus on current research work whose main objective is to develop ecological interventions to counter the isolation of people with dementia and their relatives, based on emotional communication. This work combines human expertise and artificial intelligence, in a perspective of profoundly cross-sectoral disruptive innovation, thanks to the creation of non-pharmacological and ecological interventions, accessible on a large scale, customizable and with a high marketing potential.

Anatole Lecuyer Anatole Lecuyer
Virtual reality researcher

Anatole Lécuyer is a research director at Inria, the national research institute dedicated to digital sciences. He has been conducting research in the field of virtual reality for over 20 years, exploring new ways of interacting with virtual worlds. With his team, he has designed the OpenViBE software that allows the deployment of "neural" interfaces to interact directly "with the brain". These interfaces are showing their usefulness in the field of health, accessibility and leisure. He is co-author of more than 200 scientific articles and a dozen patents. He is the author of the book "Your brain is a superhero - When new technologies reveal our unsuspected abilities" published in 2019.


Conference : Can virtual reality make you artificially smarter?
Friday 6 may 2022, 16h - 16h45 — Amphi mauve

The digital technologies of "virtual reality" are gradually entering our lives. The colossal investments of the giants of the sector such as Facebook, Google, or Samsung even make us predict the imminent arrival of "metavers": these artificial universes in which humans will be able to live together in alternative reality experiences. Beyond the immense scientific and technological challenges posed by these new media, the physiological and psychological effects on humans are questioned. If we can fear negative effects such as addiction phenomena or the famous "cybermale", what about the possible positive transformations that could result from these virtual immersions? Studies show powerful and sometimes persistent effects, which can be mobilized for various applications such as education, medicine and rehabilitation. In the end, will virtual reality end up making us artificially more intelligent?


Signing : Votre cerveau est un super-héros
Friday 6 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30

Anne-Flore Lewi Anne-Flore Lewi
Digital Marketing Specialist

Marketing consultant and digital marketing specialist, Anne-Flore Lewi has been accompanying Timeworld since 2019. In charge of digital strategy and marketing partnerships, she coordinates the marketing and communication operations of the congress throughout the year.

Antoine Bellemare Antoine Bellemare
Artist

Antoine Bellemare is a multidisciplinary artist and PhD candidate at Concordia University. He is enrolled in an individualized program whose goal is to create a dialogue between digital arts and neuroscience. His research-creation project focuses on the link between creativity, electrophysiological signals and algorithmic compositions. His work explores how sensory noise influences creative perception, and how meaning emerges from the integration of ambiguous information. Poetry, neuroscience, electroacoustics and artificial intelligence are all vectors of expression that could respond to this same exploration.


Conference : Is creativity the prerogative of biological intelligences?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 13h45 - 14h30 — Amphi mauve

Behind this deliberately provocative title, we would like to provoke a reflection on the role that new technologies, and in particular AI, can have on our way of conceiving creativity. Without talking about replacing artists by machines - which would produce a very boring result for us as well as for the artists - the question we are interested in is rather to better understand creativity by exploring the bridges between cognitive neuroscience and artificial intelligence. We will not simply list examples of "creative behavior" in artificial intelligence systems, although this is part of the point, but we will try to see how these systems can interact with human intelligence for the purpose of artistic production. These considerations will lead us to conclude by illustrating different forms of brain-machine interfaces that allow these interactions to be fluid, and by discussing how they can enrich the creative process.

Arnaud Zinflou Arnaud Zinflou
Research Scientist

Arnaud Zinflou has an extensive history working with AI projects in the fields of industrial manufacturing, logistics, finance, and online retail. He holds both a Bachelor and Master of Computer Science, as well as a Ph.D. in Computer Engineering. He currently principal research scientist at Hydro-Québec research institute and leads projects in many areas of machine learning such as computer vision, time series forecasting or representation learning. He is also the author and coauthor of more than 40 papers, 7 book chapters and 3 patents. He has been an IEEE senior member since 2015.


Table ronde : How can we use AI as a catalyst for innovation in the energy transition?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 15h15

Today, the topic of artificial intelligence is part and parcel of discussions in many sectors of society and the economy: image and speech recognition, machine translation, image generation, etc. This is in large part thanks to impressive advances in the last decade of machine learning and in particular deep learning applications. With the growing electrification of the energy mix and the diversification of generation sources— intermittent, variable and distributed—we are just scratching the surface of the potential for AI to accelerate the transition to ultra-efficient, low-emission and interconnected energy systems. New AI opportunities are fascinating and innovative, but they also raise many questions. Is artificial intelligence the best solution to accelerate the energetic transition? How do we consider the challenges of implementing an AI solution, such as robustness, bias and explainability, in order to avoid the potential lack of trust that is difficult to offset a posteriori? How do we set up a certification process for AI solutions to allow them to be used in highly regulated environments? How do we optimize the energy and resources used by AI itself, for learning and data storage, as we strive to meet climate change challenges?

Aude Motulsky Aude Motulsky
Professor in the Department of Management, Evaluation and Health

Aude Motulsky is a professor in the Department of Management, Evaluation and Health Policy at the School of Public Health of the Université de Montréal and Associate Director of the Consortium Santé Numérique. She is a researcher at the Centre de recherche du CHUM - Carrefour de l'évaluation et de l'innovation en santé, and co-director of the LabTNS - Transformation numérique en santé. Her research activities are related to the evaluation of digital tools in health, and to the digital transformation of health organizations.


Conference : Can artificial intelligence improve health?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 14h30 - 15h15 — Amphi rouge

Many voices have been speaking out about the promise of artificial intelligence in health over the past decade. However, it is still difficult to define the scope of AI uses in health, and the realization of the promises to improve the health of individuals and populations is based on many challenges still to be met. Based on a few particularly revealing use cases, the potential of AI to improve health will be illustrated, but also (and especially) the risks and challenges associated with it. All of this will illustrate the major challenge faced by decision-makers, especially technology assessment agencies, when they try to reproduce with AI the methods used to assess medical devices or drugs, but also by managers, clinicians, or patients, when they try to define whether a tool really has an added value.

Béatrice Desvergne Béatrice Desvergne
Physician and biologist

Béatrice Desvergne is a physician - specialist in anesthesia and resuscitation -, a biologist and holder of a degree in philosophy. After a few years of medical practice, she was trained in research at Inserm in Rennes, France, and then completed a 4-year post-doctoral fellowship at the National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, USA) in the field of molecular endocrinology. She joined the University of Lausanne in 1992 as an assistant professor and pursued her academic career at the Centre Intégratif de Génomique, in the Faculty of Biology and Medicine, as an associate professor and then as a full professor. She was the Dean of this faculty from 2012 to 2015. In 2019, she became Honorary Professor of the University of Lausanne. This career path allows her to be experienced both in medical practice and in fundamental research in biology. Expert in the field of genetic regulation, her research activities have been deployed more particularly in the context of metabolic diseases such as diabetes. In the field of teaching, she has participated in numerous initiatives encouraging the training of future biologists and physicians to develop a critical view of research and medical practices. She actively participated in the implementation of the first ethics course in science, a course spanning the first three years of biology studies. As dean of the Faculty of Biology and Medicine, she has strongly encouraged computational biology and has worked to set up the first infrastructures for the development of personalized medicine. This is also the field she explored further as a visiting professor at the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris (fall 2016). In 2019, she published a book entitled "From biology to personalized medicine- Better care tomorrow?" at Rue d'Ulm Editions.


Conference : Can AI be a tool to reconcile public health and personalized health?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 12h15 - 13h — Amphi bleu

AI is an indispensable tool for the development of personalized medicine. Thanks, among other things, to the genetic data specific to each individual, AI should in the near future make it possible to determine the propensity of each individual to develop certain diseases. If today, the benefits of personalized health are mainly measurable in curative approaches, the prevention aspect will be a key element of success, especially in economic terms. Public health has a major role to play in prevention at the population level. However, it remains the poor relation of all the developments that abound in the health field. If personalized medicine is aimed at prevention and has been making the buzz for a few years, why is public health, which is also responsible for prevention, unable to attract people? Where are the points of convergence between these two approaches? Could AI be the tool that will revolutionize our public health practices in the field of prevention? And for what ethical, societal and economic consequences?


Signing : De la biologie à la médecine personnalisée- Mieux soigner demain ?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 13h - 13h45

Ben Mattes Ben Mattes
Head of Rovio Montreal

In progress


Table ronde : A.I., videogames, interdisciplinary research : key ingredients for rich & safe digital lives ?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 14h30

No-code or Low code is a technology trend allowing people to create software applications with accessible interfaces instead of having to write lines of code. In 1995, there were 31,000 web pages on the Internet. Today, there are tens of billions of pages. One of the main reasons has been the democratization of accessible tools that do not require technical skills to launch a website. Over the past 5 years, there has been a strong trend for video games to engage players as part of the gaming experience, either through user-generated content features or as as a social vector. During this time, the industry has learned how to make the most of deep learning or reinforcement learning to assist game creators or open up new gaming experiences. Over the past 5 years, most work on AI has focused on creating sophisticated algorithms based on existing datasets. These algorithms have reached a level of maturity that unlocks the possibility of creating new behaviors based solely on data engineering. Virtual worlds have been a playground of choice to develop and refine A.I. before applying it into the real world. Over the past 5 years, the academic community has become increasingly aware of the importance of interdisciplinary research, with landmark achievements such as the creation of OBVIA (International Observatory on the Societal Impacts of AI and digital) in 2019 or the grant AUDACE from FRQ which promotes interdisciplinary research in 2017. The video game industry is the perfect example of an interdisciplinary activity, because a video game is the alchemy of design, programming, art, social sciences, etc. What if AI & video games reinforced there bounds within a mature interdisciplinary ecosystem? What if state of the art in A.I. and the know-how of the video game industry offered more accessible content creation tools to populate rich open virtual worlds? What if this was the next evolution for AI and video games? Montreal, the province of Quebec and Canada have long relied on these disciplines. What if when and where he should be here, now?

Benjamin Moury Benjamin Moury
Manager

Benjamin Moury has always been passionate about the restaurant business and has been in the hotel industry for nearly 16 years. Son of restaurant owners, Benjamin has perceived over the years the drastic change in the customer approach. Between France, the United States and Switzerland, he was able to grow little by little in the world of luxury hotels. At 33 years old, he believes he represents a link between what we can call the old and the new generation. This link is none other than the respect of the codes of a historical profession which is mixed with a growing technology. At the head of the operations of a hotel in Switzerland, Benjamin Moury has faith in regaining the passion of this beautiful profession through, among other things, artificial intelligence.


Conference : What place for A.I. in the hotel industry of tomorrow?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 15h15 - 16h — Amphi orange

The hotel and restaurant industry is entering a new normal: in this sense, passionate professionals want to bring their customers more quality time. How can we contribute to this? A key question is: how can the future of hospitality in an increasingly connected market be attractive? Obviously, it is not a question of putting aside the human relationships that make this such an exciting profession. It is necessary to evolve the place of the human being.

Benoit Boulet Benoit Boulet
Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering

Benoit Boulet, P.Eng., Ph.D., is Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at McGill University which he joined in 1998, and Director of the McGill Engine, a Technological Innovation and Entrepreneurship Centre. He is Associate Vice-Principal of McGill Innovation and Partnerships and was Associate Dean (Research & Innovation) of the Faculty of Engineering from 2014 to 2020. Professor Boulet obtained a Bachelor's degree in applied sciences from Université Laval in 1990, a Master of Engineering degree from McGill University in 1992, and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Toronto in 1996, all in electrical engineering. He is a former Director and current member of the McGill Centre for Intelligent Machines where he heads the Intelligent Automation Laboratory. His research areas include the design and data-driven control of autonomous electric vehicles and renewable energy systems, machine learning applied to biomedical systems, and robust industrial control.


Table ronde : How can we use AI as a catalyst for innovation in the energy transition?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 15h15

Today, the topic of artificial intelligence is part and parcel of discussions in many sectors of society and the economy: image and speech recognition, machine translation, image generation, etc. This is in large part thanks to impressive advances in the last decade of machine learning and in particular deep learning applications. With the growing electrification of the energy mix and the diversification of generation sources— intermittent, variable and distributed—we are just scratching the surface of the potential for AI to accelerate the transition to ultra-efficient, low-emission and interconnected energy systems. New AI opportunities are fascinating and innovative, but they also raise many questions. Is artificial intelligence the best solution to accelerate the energetic transition? How do we consider the challenges of implementing an AI solution, such as robustness, bias and explainability, in order to avoid the potential lack of trust that is difficult to offset a posteriori? How do we set up a certification process for AI solutions to allow them to be used in highly regulated environments? How do we optimize the energy and resources used by AI itself, for learning and data storage, as we strive to meet climate change challenges?

Benoît Dupont Benoît Dupont
Professor in Criminology

Benoît Dupont is a full professor at the School of Criminology of the Université de Montréal and Scientific Director of the Integrated Network on Cybersecurity (SERENE-RISC), which he founded in 2014. He holds the Canada Research Chair in Cybersecurity, as well as the Research Chair in Cybercrime Prevention. He serves as an observer representing the research community on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Cyber Threat Exchange (CCTX) and on the Researchers Council of the New Digital Research Infrastructure Organization (NOIRN). He is a member of the inaugural cohort of the Royal Society of Canada's College of New Scholars and Creators in the Arts and Sciences. His current research projects focus on cyber resilience, the co-evolution of crime and technology from an ecological perspective, the social organization of malicious hacker communities, and intervention strategies for victims of cyber fraud.


Conference : Can AI threaten the integrity of justice?
Friday 6 may 2022, 11h30 - 12h15 — Amphi mauve

As AI applications proliferate in the justice system and among its various stakeholders, from courts to law firms, the security issues associated with these uses are frequently overshadowed by questions about their biases. Yet the security threats to AI tools applied to justice are also a significant source of vulnerabilities that can erode public trust. After examining the various cyber risks to justice system actors, we will review the risks specific to AI. We can distinguish three broad categories of risks: accidental risks that arise from the fragility of algorithms, risks that target algorithms through poisoning, evasion, or inference attacks, and finally risks in which algorithms are used to falsify evidence. We will conclude by attempting to propose a roadmap of the knowledge and practical measures that will be required to protect the integrity of the justice system in the face of this new geography of risk.

Bernd Carsten Stahl Bernd Carsten Stahl
Professor of Critical Research in Technology

Bernd Carsten Stahl is Professor of Critical Research in Technology and Director of the Centre for Computing and Social Responsibility at De Montfort University, Leicester, UK. His interests cover philosophical issues arising from the intersections of business, technology, and information. This includes ethical questions of current and emerging of ICTs, critical approaches to information systems and issues related to responsible research and innovation.

Bilel Cherif Bilel Cherif
CEO

Entrepreneur for 15 years and passionate about new technologies and new advances that make the world evolve on a daily basis, Bilel Cherif has long been attentive to digital changes and innovation. Today he uses AI, Blockchain, Big Data... technologies that have become essential for success. After a career in Marketing, Bilel noticed that data was becoming more and more important but many did not know how to make good use of it to meet new customer requirements. Bilel therefore decided to create DNA GA, a start-up based on Swiss know-how and requirements, and which offers solutions to improve customer and user experience through the exploitation of data and innovative solutions. DNA GA, allows to create Phygital experiences, which link the physical world and the digital universe in particular in the fields of sports, retail and hospitality in order to build a unique, fluid and personalized experience. Bilel Cherif's ambition is to make DNA GA, one of the major players in new technologies and data.


Conference : How will AI change the world of sports and the user experience?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 14h30 - 15h15 — Amphi orange

We are entering a post-covid period where many industries are changing their methods, adapting to new trends and consumer demands. This adaptation is done through the use of new technologies like Artificial Intelligence. The sports industry has also knocked on the door of AI. According to a recent report published by Allied Market Research, the global AI market in sports in 2020 was valued at $1.4 billion and is expected to reach $19.2 billion by 2030. More than ever, athletes are aware of the importance of AI in analyzing their sports performance, their lived experience as well as their health. AI is considered today as a very efficient tool in sports and is starting to be more and more adopted by sports professionals. It is revolutionizing the world of sports by optimizing performance through data collection and then allowing amateur or professional athletes to evaluate their performance and improve. Thanks to AI, "gamifying sports experiences" becomes possible. It is about making sports experiences more fun and immersive by rewarding fans/sportsmen for their performance and giving the possibility to fight other amateurs in the virtual world.

Carl-Edwin Carl-Edwin
CEO of Northern Arena Productions

Carl-Edwin is a TV pro as well as a techno and video game hipster. He is the founder and CEO of Northern Arena Productions, a TV and interactive media production company, and Northern Arena, one of the country's largest esport tournament organizers. He is the owner of the Mirage esport team. He also created the Canadian Game Awards, which he produces. As comfortable in front of the camera as he is behind it, he has been covering the high-tech industry since 2009 as a freelance journalist, speaker and TV personality. You've probably seen him in movies in tech capsules and on Radio-Canada in the series "Ça me branche" and on Radio Canada's "Ya pas deux matin pareil". We don't know any more than you do when he finds time to sleep.


Table ronde : A.I., videogames, interdisciplinary research : key ingredients for rich & safe digital lives ?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 14h30

No-code or Low code is a technology trend allowing people to create software applications with accessible interfaces instead of having to write lines of code. In 1995, there were 31,000 web pages on the Internet. Today, there are tens of billions of pages. One of the main reasons has been the democratization of accessible tools that do not require technical skills to launch a website. Over the past 5 years, there has been a strong trend for video games to engage players as part of the gaming experience, either through user-generated content features or as as a social vector. During this time, the industry has learned how to make the most of deep learning or reinforcement learning to assist game creators or open up new gaming experiences. Over the past 5 years, most work on AI has focused on creating sophisticated algorithms based on existing datasets. These algorithms have reached a level of maturity that unlocks the possibility of creating new behaviors based solely on data engineering. Virtual worlds have been a playground of choice to develop and refine A.I. before applying it into the real world. Over the past 5 years, the academic community has become increasingly aware of the importance of interdisciplinary research, with landmark achievements such as the creation of OBVIA (International Observatory on the Societal Impacts of AI and digital) in 2019 or the grant AUDACE from FRQ which promotes interdisciplinary research in 2017. The video game industry is the perfect example of an interdisciplinary activity, because a video game is the alchemy of design, programming, art, social sciences, etc. What if AI & video games reinforced there bounds within a mature interdisciplinary ecosystem? What if state of the art in A.I. and the know-how of the video game industry offered more accessible content creation tools to populate rich open virtual worlds? What if this was the next evolution for AI and video games? Montreal, the province of Quebec and Canada have long relied on these disciplines. What if when and where he should be here, now?

Carl Morch Carl Morch
Professor of Psychology

Carl is scientific manager of FARI - Institute of AI for the Common Good, a research organization created by the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) and the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). He is a researcher working on the social challenges of using technologies (AI and Data) in health (psychology, dentistry). He is also an associate professor at the Department of Psychology of the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). He was a postdoctoral researcher at Algora Lab (University of Montreal & Mila) in 2021, a fellow of the International Observatory on the Societal Impacts of AI and Digital Technologies (OBVIA).


Conference : Can universities contribute more to a public and local AI?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 11h30 - 12h15 — Amphi mauve

AI systems have become omnipresent in the public sphere. But several challenges exist regarding their deployment and regulation: access to experts on these technologies is difficult and it is very complex to assess their possible social, legal, ethical and ecological impacts. In this context, how to design a public AI, thought locally by complementary entities (universities, administrations, citizens, non-governmental organizations)? To try to answer this question, two Belgian universities (Université Libre de Bruxelles and Vrije Universiteit Brussel) have joined forces to bring together researchers in AI, Data and Robotics, Law, Social Sciences and Economics. FARI - Institute of AI for the Common Good develops collaborative projects to propose courses of action and reflection on the use of AI in society, with a view to public good. This project has received funding from the NextGenerationEU plan to work in collaboration with the Brussels Capital Region.

Carole Jabet Carole Jabet
Scientific Director

Carole Jabet is Scientific Director of the Fonds de recherche du Québec Santé (FRQS) and Director of Oncopole, the FRQS Cancer Center. She obtained an engineering degree from the École Centrale de Lyon, with a bioengineering option, in 1992, a PhD in science, with a biophysics and molecular biology option, from the École Centrale de Paris in 1996, and a postdoctorate at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in 1999. During her career, she has held several management and scientific advisory positions in the health research community. From 2003 to 2009, she worked at Génome Québec as Vice-President of Scientific Affairs. She then acted as a partner of the consulting firm CapCOGITO. Since November 2018, she was Assistant Director of Research at the CHUM Research Center after having been Assistant Director of Operations there. She currently serves on the boards of the CATALIS early clinical research initiative and the College of Reviewers of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.


Conference : Opening session
Thursday 5 may 2022, 9h15 - 10h — Amphi bleu


Table ronde : How to make AI truly democratic?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 10h45

The dialogue around artificial intelligence is still too elitist. Complex terms, expert debates, ethical questions between academics... But how can we put AI and data back at the heart of a pluralistic exchange, truly open and accessible to the greatest number? The round table organized by the Fonds de recherche du Québec will bring together citizens to start a new dialogue on AI and data. How can we ensure that diverse populations understand the foundations of AI, its impacts and its challenges? How do we ensure that these technologies are developed in response to the needs of people and communities and in service of the public interest? What are the best practices to support the effective participation of citizens in data exploitation projects? These are some of the questions that will fuel the discussions of this roundtable and the exchanges with the public.

Catherine Maunoury Catherine Maunoury
CEO Aéro-Club de France

Catherine Maunoury has been interested in airplanes since she was very young. She was only eight years old when her father, a medical pilot, took her flying for the first time. Encouraged by him, she made her first solo flight at the age of 15 and became the youngest licensed pilot at 17. Her passion led her to the highest level of competition: she accumulated titles at the French, European and World championships and is still today among the best female pilots in the world. In 2010 Catherine Maunoury was appointed director of the Musée de l'Air et de l'Espace in Le Bourget and in 2017 president of the Aéro-Club de France.


Conference : Does artificial intelligence fly?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 11h30 - 12h15 — Amphi rouge

The first loop in the history of aviation was accomplished by a machine, without the help of a pilot... and with a reduced "intelligence"; it was in 1913. Later, engineers invented autopilots and other intelligent systems capable of supporting pilots and facilitating their decision-making in order to carry out the various missions and functions assigned to aviation. Aerobatics pilots have not taken advantage of these technological advances to develop their art. But what would an aerobatic competition between intelligent aircraft or an aerial event performed by aircraft piloted by AIs mean? If flying is not a human characteristic, can humans do without the freedom offered by flight? Does the freedom of the man-flyer begin where the AI stops his?

Catherine Régis Catherine Régis
Law professor

Catherine Regis is a full professor at the University of Montreal Law Faculty, holder of a Canada Research Chair in health law and policy, co-founder of the Health Hub – Policy, Organizations and Law (H-POD) and she is leading the Working group on Digital Innovation and Artificial Intelligence for the U7+ Alliance which regroups more than 50 universities around the world. She is also a researcher at Mila ((The Quebec Institut on Artificial Intelligence), the Centre de recherche en droit public (CRDP), the Observatory of the Social Impacts of AI and Digital Technology (OBVIA), and Special advisor and Associate vice-president with planning and strategic communication at the University of Montreal. Catherine participated in the creation of the Montreal Declaration for a responsible development of artificial intelligence as a member of its scientific committee and is an expert member for the Global Partnership on Artificial Intelligence (GPAI). Her main areas of research are the regulation of digital innovation and AI as well as health law and policy, at the local and international levels.


Conference : What is the place of human rights in AI?
Friday 6 may 2022, 10h45 - 11h30 — Amphi bleu

This complex issue is controversial. Yet, it is fundamental and must be at the heart of the debates on AI, both nationally and internationally. Indeed, while the promises of AI make people dream, the last few years have also shown the impact that this technology can have on the rights and freedoms of individuals such as equality, non-discrimination and privacy. To answer this question, it is useful to recall the role and scope of human rights, particularly those of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Second, the burgeoning work of the past five years in creating ethical charters to guide the responsible development of AI must also be analyzed to determine its actual contribution, and blind spots, in relation to human rights. Recently, this work culminated in the adoption on November 24, 2021 of the UNESCO Recommendation on the Ethics of Artificial Intelligence, the first global normative instrument of its kind. This instrument, which gives an important place to human rights, responded to a need for an international normative framework. If the effervescence of this normative activity seems a priori to be a sign that AI is developing under the aegis of a framework that values human rights, few means are nevertheless available to force its execution. Complementary means must therefore be mobilized to help human rights move from ambition to realization.

Catherine Villemer Catherine Villemer
Assistant to the Vice-Rector

Catherine Villemer has 20 years of experience in the field of international cooperation and relations, research valorization and knowledge mobilization. An agro-economist engineer (Agrocampus Ouest, France), she has studied, taught and worked in Europe (France, Belgium and Germany), Asia (Vietnam, Hong Kong) and North America (Canada). At the Université de Montréal, she has been contributing to the internationalization of the University at the rectorate since 2016. Previously, she worked as coordinator and then executive director of the Centre of Excellence on the European Union (Université de Montréal - McGill University, 2007-2015) and senior advisor to the partnerships of the Centre d'études et de recherches internationales de l'Université de Montréal (CÉRIUM, 2013-2015). She has participated in the organization of several major world conferences on behalf of the Université de Montréal (European Consortium for Political Research General Conference 2015, World Health Summit 2017). Catherine Villemer is a member of the Board of Directors and the Audit Committee of CÉGEP de Bois-de-Boulogne, a general and vocational college located in Montreal. She was Vice President of UniAgro Canada (2013 - 2015), the Canadian branch of the federation of agricultural engineers of the graduate associations of seven French grandes écoles and public institutions of higher agronomic education.

Catherine Wilhelmy Catherine Wilhelmy
Patient Partnership Manager

Affected by breast cancer in 2018, after participating in two clinical trials and a research project on the quality of life of patients affected by cancer, Catherine Wilhelmy became a full-time research patient partner! Responsible for the patient partnership at the CHUS Research Centre, she is also involved with the SSA Quebec Support Unit where she is a patient partner in the scientific direction and co-leader of Experiences; the Quebec community of practice of patient partners in research. She also contributes to the mission of organizations associated with breast cancer research, such as the McPeak Sirois Group, the Quebec Breast Cancer Foundation, Coalition priorité cancer au Québec, the Sherbrooke Cancer Research Institute, Biocan RX. "To actively participate in research is to regain power over the disease and to create meaning from events that do not have any.


Table ronde : How to make AI truly democratic?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 10h45

The dialogue around artificial intelligence is still too elitist. Complex terms, expert debates, ethical questions between academics... But how can we put AI and data back at the heart of a pluralistic exchange, truly open and accessible to the greatest number? The round table organized by the Fonds de recherche du Québec will bring together citizens to start a new dialogue on AI and data. How can we ensure that diverse populations understand the foundations of AI, its impacts and its challenges? How do we ensure that these technologies are developed in response to the needs of people and communities and in service of the public interest? What are the best practices to support the effective participation of citizens in data exploitation projects? These are some of the questions that will fuel the discussions of this roundtable and the exchanges with the public.

Cécile Petitgand Cécile Petitgand
Data Access Coordinator

Cécile Petitgand is the coordinator of the Data Access Initiative of the Table nationale des directeurs de la recherche of the Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec (MSSS). She is also a research associate at the Centre de recherche du CHUM (CRCHUM), a Data Access Advisor at the Fonds de recherche du Québec Santé (FRQS) and an associate professor at the École de santé publique de l'Université de Montréal (ESPUM). Cécile holds a PhD in Management Sciences from the University of Paris-Dauphine and the University of Sao Paulo (Brazil), and a Master's degree in Economics from the Paris School of Economics. She did her post-doctoral work at the Hub santé : politique, organisations et droit (H-POD) of the Université de Montréal. She is also a researcher associated with the International Observatory on the Societal Impacts of AI and Digital Technologies (OBVIA) and the JusticIA legal research group at the Université de Montréal. Her expertise focuses on the management of the responsible development and implementation of artificial intelligence systems in health care institutions.


Table ronde : How to make AI truly democratic?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 10h45

The dialogue around artificial intelligence is still too elitist. Complex terms, expert debates, ethical questions between academics... But how can we put AI and data back at the heart of a pluralistic exchange, truly open and accessible to the greatest number? The round table organized by the Fonds de recherche du Québec will bring together citizens to start a new dialogue on AI and data. How can we ensure that diverse populations understand the foundations of AI, its impacts and its challenges? How do we ensure that these technologies are developed in response to the needs of people and communities and in service of the public interest? What are the best practices to support the effective participation of citizens in data exploitation projects? These are some of the questions that will fuel the discussions of this roundtable and the exchanges with the public.

Céline Castets-Renard Céline Castets-Renard
Professor of Law

Céline Castets-Renard is a full professor in the Faculty of Civil Law at the University of Ottawa and holds the Global Responsible AI Research Chair. She also holds the Research Chair in Law, Accountability and social trust supported by the French Government (ANR-3IA) within ANITI (Artificial and Natural Intelligence Toulouse Institute). She is an expert member of the Observatory on the Economics of Online Platforms within the European Commission. Her research work focuses on digital and artificial intelligence law and regulation in a comparative perspective (Canadian, European and American law), especially on personal data and privacy protection, policing technologies, and online platforms. She also studies more broadly the impact of technologies on human rights, as well as the social stakes of technologies in a global perspective, particularly in North-South relations and from a humanitarian law perspective.


Conference : Is there a need for an AI law?
Friday 6 may 2022, 16h - 16h45 — Amphi rouge

Artificial intelligence algorithms in operation have intruded into professional and personal daily lives, such as medical diagnostic assistance or anomaly detection in industry. While the benefits of these technologies are certain, much research has also revealed the social risks. Machine learning algorithms train on massive data to predict, recommend or build decisions. They directly affect individuals or groups by designating, for example, recipients of social aid or loans. However, these methods are so complex and use such a large amount of data and parameters that it can be impossible to understand how decisions are made and to challenge them. Some AI applications can also generate discrimination due to racial, social or gender bias and errors, especially due to over- or under-representation of groups in the datasets. Faced with major social risks, charters and ethical principles have been adopted, such as the Montreal Declaration. Should the ethical approach now be supplemented by legal rules? The risks for human rights are such that several legislators in the world are thinking about it to make AI "legally responsible" and more "inclusive".

Christian Byk Christian Byk
Judge of the Court of Appeal of Paris

Christian Byk is a judge of the Court of Appeal of Paris, Secretary General of the International Association of Law, Ethics and Science and chair of the UNESCO Intergovermental Bioethics Committee. His doctoral dissertation (Ph.D) focused on a comparison of legislative policy models in North America and Europe in the perspective of elaborating biolaw. He is qualified to conduct research, has practiced as a law professor at the University of Poitiers and as a visiting professor in many countries. He is the author of ten books and more than 300 articles in the field of bioethics and for 30 years directs the International Journal of Bioethics and Ethics of Science and the journal Law, Health and Society. Since the early 1980s, Christian Byk has acquired training and experience in bioethics and science ethics.Trained in international law, he is well acquainted with the functioning of the international organizations of the United Nations system (UNESCO, WHO, WIPO, IAEA) as well as that of European organizations (Council of Europe and European Union). For more than 10 years, he was head of the French delegation to the Council of Europe's Bioethics Committee, then advisor to the Secretary General of the Council of Europe and drafted the first draft of the European Convention on Biomedicine and Human Rights. He has also participated in the normative activities of the European Union (patentability of biotechnologies). Since the late 1980s, he has been involved in UNESCO's bioethics activities and has participated in the negotiations that led to the adoption of the three UNESCO Declarations in this field. Since 2013, he is representing France on the Intergovernmental Bioethics Committee, of which he was successively Vice-President (2015-2017) and President (2017-2019). He participates in the activities of non-governmental organizations: since 1989 he heads the International Association of Law, Ethics and Science, served as Vice-President of CIOMS (1994-2000) and is a founding member of the International Association of Bioethics.Since 2002, he has been a member of the French National Commission for UNESCO, where he chairs the committee on bioethics and ethics of science.


Conference : Is the digital age leading to the emergence of new sovereignty stake holders?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 10h45 - 11h30 — Amphi rouge

Once a privileged place for the intervention of sovereign states, the international space has long since ceased to be its exclusive place and international trade is, from this point of view, a good illustration of this historical reality. However, the development of exchanges has been accomplished since the last decades of the twentieth century in the context of a "globalized world" very different from what we have known until now both because of the nature and the scale of activities concerned as well as the evolution of the international framework in which these exchanges take place. And this leads to major upheavals in the identification of the actors of sovereignty, its attributes and the influence that results from it on normative production and its scope, perhaps revealing the construction of a new social ontology which goes beyond the mere sphere of exchanges.


Signing : Intelligence artificielle - Vivre avec
Thursday 5 may 2022, 11h30 - 12h15
Signing : La peur des virus - Décider face à l'urgence - Tome 1
Thursday 5 may 2022, 11h30 - 12h15
Signing : La peur des virus - Décider face à l'urgence - Tome 2
Thursday 5 may 2022, 11h30 - 12h15

Christian Gagné Christian Gagné
Director of the Institute for Intelligence and Data

Christian Gagné is a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Laval University. He is the director of the Institute for Intelligence and Data (IID) at Laval University. He holds a Canada-CIFAR Chair in Artificial Intelligence and is an associate member of Mila. He is also a member of the Laboratoire de vision et systèmes numériques (LVSN), a component of the Centre de recherche en robotique, vision et intelligence machine (CeRVIM) as well as of the Centre de recherche en données massives (CRDM) of Laval University. His research interests include the development of methods for machine learning and stochastic optimization. In particular, he is interested in deep neural networks, representation learning and transfer, and the use of machine learning for black-box optimization. An important part of his work also focuses on the application of these techniques in fields such as computer vision, microscopy, health, energy and transportation.


Conference : Can we do AI with little data?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 13h45 - 14h30 — Amphi mauve

Deep learning, the flagship discipline of AI, is known to be data-intensive, with the best performances often obtained from large datasets. Some recent advances in the field require access to very large datasets, which combined with the need for considerable computational resources to process these data, leads us to believe that the capacity for innovation is limited to the biggest players in the field. But, is learning models based essentially on the statistical power of very large games the only possible way to do deep learning? In other words, given that biological learning is not directly based on the analysis of such very large data sets, how can we create intelligent systems with relatively little data? This conference will address the scientific, technical and societal issues related to learning AI systems with smaller datasets.

Christian Wopperer Christian Wopperer
Vice President, Sales Intelligence

Christian Wopperer has been Vice President, Sales Intelligence at CEIM for the past seventeen years. He has over thirty years of experience in business development and software sales in Europe and Canada. His entrepreneurial experience contributes to his deep understanding of the marketing and sales issues of start-ups. He founded and managed a quality assurance software company in Zürich, Switzerland, which increased its annual sales by 250%. Since his arrival in Canada in 1995, he has assisted Canadian companies in their export efforts to Europe. He managed the marketing and sales department of Orthofab and was responsible for the marketing strategy of KMtechnologies in Montreal. Christian Wopperer offers customized sales advice to IT companies in the commercialization phase. He holds a Swiss Federal Economic Maturity, an IT diploma from EPSIC (Lausanne, Switzerland) and the Advanced Management Course certification from McGill University. He was also part of the first cohort of e-commerce graduates from the Montreal Institute of Electronic Commerce.


Conference : What are the issues and challenges of monetizing artificial intelligence?
Friday 6 may 2022, 14h30 - 15h15 — Amphi mauve

Today, the new Eldorado is undoubtedly artificial intelligence, but companies are not buying AI. They are buying the solution to their problems and that's the real value-add that provides an incredible growth engine. There is no magical thinking. AI also raises, like any innovation, multiple issues. For example, the one that consists in putting a price equation on an added value with many components. How to integrate the workforce that will contextualize the predictive information collected? What is the veracity, the relevance of the metadata? What methodology to use and what calculations? What is the cloud, what are its effects and their derivatives? What are the potential misuses of AI? Given its ability to assist, replace, and even surpass humans for an infinite variety of tasks, AI is naturally imposed in all industries. The goal of the conference will be to move beyond wishful thinking and address the challenge of optimally combining the monetization of various AI-enabled business models to meet the new expectations of today's customers.

Cyril Rigaud Cyril Rigaud
Scientific advisor

Cyril Rigaud was born in Provence and spent his childhood and adolescence gazing at the sky. He studied science and earned a pilot certificate at age 17. In June 1995, he joined the French Air Force as a transport pilot. Initially in charge of support and training missions for forces in mainland France, overseas, and abroad, he became an instructor in 2006-2008. He then went on to join the transportation team for high-level government officials and health evacuations, until 2013. As of 2010, he has also ensured travel for top government officials. In early 2016, he became a co-pilot on a Canadair CL 415 water bombardier for emergency services.

Daniel Jutras Daniel Jutras
Rector of the Université de Montréal

A law graduate from the Université de Montréal and Harvard University, Daniel Jutras has been the Rector of the Université de Montréal since June 1, 2020. Previously, he taught at the Faculty of Law of McGill University from 1985 to 2020, where he held the Wainwright Chair in Civil Law for 10 years and was Dean of the Faculty from 2009 to 2016. He also served as Senior Legal Advisor to the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, the Right Honourable Beverley McLachlin, between 2002 and 2005. Daniel Jutras has devoted his research to issues of judicial institutions and dispute resolution from a comparative perspective. A member of the Quebec Bar since 1984, Daniel Jutras has twice appeared before the Supreme Court of Canada as amicus curie appointed by the Court itself in two of the most important public law cases of the last decade. He has been an Officer of the Order of Canada since 2019. He was also awarded the Mérite du Barreau du Québec in 2016, the distinction of Advocatus Emeritus of the Barreau du Québec in 2014 and the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2013.


Conference : Opening session
Thursday 5 may 2022, 9h15 - 10h — Amphi bleu

Daphné Marnat Daphné Marnat
Social science expert

Daphné Marnat is an expert in social sciences. For the past fifteen years, she has been accompanying companies in their technological deployment from the point of view of their users (data studies, conditions of appropriation of the technology). Unbias is her second company creation. She militates for technology at the service of people, for the place of women in entrepreneurship and technology. As a data specialist, she defends qualitative data, not from quantity, but from meaning, from true intelligence.


Conference : Can we teach algorithms not to be sexist?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 16h - 16h45 — Amphi rouge

Biases are not an issue, because they are what make it possible to distinguish one information from another. Without them, there is no conceptualization or language possible. In Natural Language Processing, the more we control biases, the better we perform. NLU specialists, this mantra has helped us to make a jump in performance in natural language processing, without using large learning models that are too expensive in terms of data and energy. But above all, it allowed us to identify where discriminatory risks, especially sexism, are generated in language. This dectection is particularly important, as it is difficult for humans to do, trapped in their implicit representations. We will show you what the machine can detect and propose to obtain an Epicene language, i.e. a gender neutral language. This use case is a nice illustration of how artificial intelligence can help solve a complex societal problem, and restore the dialogue between humans.

David Elbaz David Elbaz
Astrophysicist

David Elbaz, astrophysicist, is a director of research at the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives (CEA Saclay). He studies the formation of galaxies with a particular interest in the role of stardust, galactic black holes and the families of galaxies called galaxy clusters. His work has been awarded prizes by the Académie des Sciences (Prix Jaffé 2017) and the American Astronomical Society (Prix Chrétien 2000). He is a member of the European Academy of Sciences (Academia Europaea) and a Highly Cited Researcher (1% of researchers) according to the Web of Science (Clarivate Analystics). He is the Managing Editor of the scientific journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, which was originally the journal of European astrophysics and has expanded to 28 member countries. Alongside his research work, he participates in the dissemination of science through conferences, books, shows, documentaries and radio broadcasts. His latest book "Searching for the invisible universe: dark matter, dark energy, black holes" (2016 éditions Odile Jacob) received the Science & Philosophy 2017 Book Prize from the X-Philo association of the Ecole Polytechnique and was nominated for the Goût des Sciences 2017 prize from the French Ministry of Research.


Conference : Will artificial intelligence come to the rescue of the exploration of the universe?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 15h15 - 16h — Amphi mauve

Astrophysicists no longer put their eye to the telescope for a long time, they have been replaced by CCD cameras and other instruments capable of collecting light for a long time. We can thus see sources several billion times weaker than the sensitivity of our eyes. A new revolution is underway: the amount of information we receive from the sky no longer exceeds only the capacity of our eyes but also our brains! More and more information collected by our telescopes requires the help of an artificial intelligence able to classify galaxies according to their shapes, to trace the history of star births, to map dark matter and to find in real time very fast, transient events, linked to the explosion of a star, to solar activity, to exoplanets. Will we be able to understand what AI sees in the universe? Is the universe slipping away from us?

David Himbert David Himbert
Photographer

David Himbert is a French-Canadian photographer based in Montreal, represented in Paris by the Hans Lucas studio and in New York by the Polaris agency. David works with companies and institutions, media, executives and public figures. He regularly collaborates with various international media: L'Express, Los Angeles Times, Le Figaro, El Pais, Le Monde, Jeune Afrique, Mediapart, L'Obs, Dissent Magazine, Télérama, Courrier International, BuzzFeed, Le Devoir, Le Point, Marianne, The Sun, etc. He is the recipient of several awards in Quebec and Canada, including a Lux Infopresse award, which recognizes the best visual achievements in the fields of photography and illustration in Quebec, and a silver medal at the Canadian Magazine Awards in Toronto.

David Saint-Jacques David Saint-Jacques
Astronaut

David Saint-Jacques has always been keen on exploring the world around him. Prior to joining the Canadian space program in May 2009, he practised family medicine in a northern Canadian village overlooking Hudson Bay. Before that, he worked as an astrophysicist in Cambridge, United Kingdom; Tokyo, Japan; Hawaii, USA; and Montreal, Canada. He was also a clinical faculty lecturer for McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine and an engineer for a Quebec-based small business. As a member of the international astronaut team, David Saint-Jacques has acted as capcom (the liaison between the team on the ground and the crew in space) and carried out various operations planning and support functions at NASA’s Mission Control Center and Astronaut Office. On December 3, 2018, he flew to the International Space Station as an Expedition 58/59 flight engineer and co-pilot of the Soyuz spacecraft. During his 204-day mission, he conducted a series of scientific experiments, robotics tasks and technology demonstrations. David Saint-Jacques became the fourth Canadian Space Agency astronaut to perform a spacewalk and the first to use Canadarm2 to catch a visiting spacecraft.


Table ronde : Could AI make decisions instead of the control centers or the astronaut?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 10h45

Astronauts must place total trust in the programming of their flights, which includes numerous self-checking procedures to correct itself, and warning devices to request human intervention. We are now witnessing fully automated flights with passenger-tourists with no specific skills. Human intervention is still possible, but only to a certain extent, in case of unforeseen events, and human intelligence remains assisted by AI. Astronauts are trained to eventually take full programmatic control in case of a major accident, such as a fire, depressurization, breakdown, or the impact of space waste. This has already happened. Would they blindly trust an artificial intelligence?

Doina Precup Doina Precup
Computer science researcher

Doina Precup splits her time between McGill University, where she holds a Canada-CIFAR AI chair, and DeepMind Montreal, where she has been leading the research team since its formation in October 2017. She is also a core member of Mila (the Quebec AI institute). Dr. Precup obtained her Ph.D. in Computer Science at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst in 2000. Her main research interests are in reinforcement learning, focusing on temporal abstraction, improving generalization and efficiency, and applying machine learning to real-world problems, especially in medicine. Dr. Precup is also involved in activities aiming to improve diversity in machine learning.


Conference : Can reinforcement learning lead to general artificial intelligence?
Friday 6 may 2022, 15h15 - 16h — Amphi mauve

Reinforcement learning is a research topic that has developed at the intersection of operations research, statistics, neuroscience and cognitive science. It provides an approach for autonomous agents to learn from interaction with their environment and from rewards, which provide an encoding of goals. But how can we translate intuitive tasks into a numerical reward? And would such a reward, together with an interesting environment, be sufficient to allow agents to learn complex skills and predictions?

Eileen Collins Eileen Collins
Astronaut

Eileen M. Collins is a former astronaut and a retired U.S. Air Force colonel. A former military instructor and test pilot, Collins was the first woman pilot and first woman commander of a space shuttle. She received a bachelor’s degree in mathematics/economics from Syracuse University in 1978, where she was an Air Force ROTC Distinguished Graduate. She has earned a master of science degree in operations research from Stanford University in 1986, and a master of arts degree in space systems management from Webster University in 1989. Her career included tours as a T-38 instructor pilot, a C-141 aircraft commander, an assistant professor in mathematics at the U.S. Air Force Academy, and a graduate of the USAF Test Pilot School.Collins piloted space shuttle Discovery in 1995 and Atlantis in 1997. Collins became the first woman commander of a U.S. spacecraft with shuttle mission Columbia in 1999, the deployment of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Her final space flight was as commander of Discovery in 2005, the “Return to Flight Mission” after the tragic loss of Columbia.Collins currently serves on several boards and advisory panels, is a professional speaker and an aerospace consultant. She is married with two children.


Table ronde : Could AI make decisions instead of the control centers or the astronaut?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 10h45

Astronauts must place total trust in the programming of their flights, which includes numerous self-checking procedures to correct itself, and warning devices to request human intervention. We are now witnessing fully automated flights with passenger-tourists with no specific skills. Human intervention is still possible, but only to a certain extent, in case of unforeseen events, and human intelligence remains assisted by AI. Astronauts are trained to eventually take full programmatic control in case of a major accident, such as a fire, depressurization, breakdown, or the impact of space waste. This has already happened. Would they blindly trust an artificial intelligence?

Éliane Ubalijoro Éliane Ubalijoro
Executive Director

Éliane Ubalijoro, PhD, is the Executive Director of Sustainability in the Digital Age and Global Hub Director for Future Earth Canada. Her decades of experience span academia, science-policy and the non-profit and international development sectors. She is a Professor of Practice for Public-Private Sector Partnerships at McGill University’s Institute for the Study of International Development, and a Research Professor at Concordia University in the Department of Geography, Planning and Environment. She is a member of Rwanda’s National Science and Technology Council and has been a member of the Presidential Advisory Council for Rwandan President Paul Kagame since its inception in September 2007. She is a member of the Expert Consultation Group on the Post COVID-19 Implications on Collaborative Governance of Genomics Research, Innovation, and Genetic Diversity. Éliane is a member of the African Development Bank’s Expert Global Community of Practice on COVID-19 Response Strategies in Africa. She is a member of the newly created Capitals Coalition Supervisory Board. Éliane teaches and advises in Leadership programs to help equip executives in science, innovation and international development with tools that support inner and outer sustainable transformation towards global prosperity.


Conference : Can artificial intelligence be used responsibly to reach the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030?
Friday 6 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30 — Amphi rouge

Artificial intelligence now provides many advanced technologies such as biometric identification, which is powerful enough to be used in airports. If its accuracy is very high, the risk of zero error does not exist. This technology is sometimes accepted and used for biometric surveillance in public spaces. At the global level, opinions are divided: biometric identification is accepted in some countries, and refused in others because it violates fundamental ethical principles such as the protection of privacy or privacity. Moreover, liberty organizations believe that it opens the way to expanded police surveillance. The European Union has decided to regulate such devices with new rules on AI. But in general, we lack a clear ethical framework on the subject and we need a real regulation on a global scale because local rules at the level of a country or even of Europe do not protect outside these borders. So the question is: what do you think about these kinds of technologies? Would it be prudent to ban them outright or should we consider specific situations where the use of these technologies can be beneficial?

Élise Labonté-LeMoyne Élise Labonté-LeMoyne
Researcher in consumer behavior

Elise Labonte-LeMoyne, Ph.D. is a researcher at the Tech3Lab and Ux Research Chair at HEC Montreal and the principal investigator of the Thèsez-vous digital ecosystem participatory design research program. She combines her expertise in neuroscience, exercise science and information technology to study user experience and human-computer interaction. Her research has been published in journals and conferences such as Computers in Human Behavior, Journal of the Association for Information Systems and the CHI conference. She is a team member of the "L’IA centrée sur l’humain : du développement des algorithmes responsables à l’adoption de l’IA" research project, funded by IVADO.


Table ronde : What is missing in AI today?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 13h45

The field of artificial intelligence has gone through some tough times, most notably known as "AI winters." But over the past decade, we have seen a dramatic rebound, thanks to new capabilities combined with scientific and technological advances. AI is now seen as an enabling technology, with the potential to make an impact in many, many areas. It is often compared to the technologies that fueled the industrial revolutions. Although more and more concrete applications of AI exist, research in the field is far from over. In what areas has AI not yet been exploited to its full potential? At a more fundamental level, what are the limits of current approaches? What are the promising avenues of research and what are the obstacles that seem insurmountable? In short, what is missing in AI today?

Emilie St-Hilaire Emilie St-Hilaire
Doctoral candidate in the Humanities

Emilie is currently a doctoral candidate in the Humanities PhD program at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada. Her FRQSC-funded research examines the sub-cultural phenomenon of reborn dolls from a feminist perspective. Being one of few researchers studying this topic Emilie is regularly interviewed by journalists on the topic of reborn dolls. Her research has been cited in The Guardian (US), Le Temps (Switzerland), and Gehirn and Geist (Germany) and on NPR (US). Emilie's academic writing has been published in peer-reviewed journals including RACAR, and Le Journal International de Bioéthique. She is the author of a chapter in the book The Creation of iGiselle: Classical Ballet Meets Contemporary Video Games, edited by Nora Foster Stovel, published by the University of Alberta Press (2019).


Conference : Do social robots need bodies?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 10h45 - 11h30 — Amphi orange

The global Covid-19 pandemic has exacerbated the problem of isolation and loneliness. Artificially intelligent social robots have been developed over the past couple decades to assist individuals in need of companionship. This talk will present research demonstrating that there are already thousands of people around the world finding companionship through surrogate human figures in the form of dolls. The sensory experience and hyper-realism of silicone dolls contributes to their success at being brought to life through the imaginative perception of the doll owner. The emotions that develop from these synthetic relationships are real and fulfilling. This talk will describe how such positive affective states are achieved and will consider whether artificial intelligence is a detriment or a benefit to existing forms of synthetic relationships.

Éric Caire Éric Caire
Minister of Cybersecurity and Digital Affairs

Mr. Eric Caire was appointed Minister of Cybersecurity and Digital Affairs on January 1, 2022. The first politician to head the Ministry of Cybersecurity and Digital (MCN), he has also served as Minister responsible for Access to Information and Privacy since January 2021, in addition to serving as Deputy Government House Leader since November 2018. Most importantly, he has proudly represented the riding of La Peltrie as an MP since March 2007. Mr. Caire is well versed in the issues facing his new ministry, having served as the Minister for Government Digital Transformation from October 2018 until the creation of the CNM. During the same period and simultaneously, he was entrusted with the position of Vice-President of the Treasury Board. A member of the Quebec National Assembly since 2007, he was the spokesperson for the second opposition group on the efficiency of public administration for four years. In addition, he has served on several committees, including the Committee on Public Administration. A computer scientist by profession, Mr. Caire has many years of experience as a programmer-analyst and as a college computer science teacher. His career path has made him a seasoned minister who is always on the lookout for technological developments.

Érick Delage Érick Delage
Decision Sciences Researcher

Érick Delage est professeur à HEC Montréal au département des sciences de la décision. Il a un intérêt marqué pour les méthodologies quantitatives qui peuvent aider à gérer les risques liés à l'incertitude du marché, de l'environnement ou de la physique que l’on rencontre dans les problèmes de décisions industrielles et financières. Plus précisément, ses intérêts de recherche couvrent les domaines de l'optimisation, de l'analyse décisionnelle, de l'intelligence artificielle et de la statistique appliquée. Il est particulièrement fasciné par la manière dont le concept d'optimisation robuste peut concilier la conception d'un modèle de décision avec l'ambiguïté qui prévaut quant aux résultats et à la manière dont ceux-ci peuvent être perçus par le décideur. Les applications qui ont retenu son attention comprennent, entre autres, la sélection de portefeuilles, le commerce électronique, l'allocation de ressources, le routage de réseaux, la gestion des stocks et les problèmes de production d'énergie. Il est membre de l'équipe du projet de recherche " Apprentissage automatique et optimisation intégrés pour la prise de décision en incertitude ", financé par IVADO.


Table ronde : What is missing in AI today?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 13h45

The field of artificial intelligence has gone through some tough times, most notably known as "AI winters." But over the past decade, we have seen a dramatic rebound, thanks to new capabilities combined with scientific and technological advances. AI is now seen as an enabling technology, with the potential to make an impact in many, many areas. It is often compared to the technologies that fueled the industrial revolutions. Although more and more concrete applications of AI exist, research in the field is far from over. In what areas has AI not yet been exploited to its full potential? At a more fundamental level, what are the limits of current approaches? What are the promising avenues of research and what are the obstacles that seem insurmountable? In short, what is missing in AI today?

Estelle Honnorat Estelle Honnorat
Director, investigative journalist

Trained at the Ecole Supérieure de Journalisme de Paris with a specialization in radio, Estelle perfected her methods by joining the Master in Investigative Journalism at City, University of London. After several years as an investigator and writer in several investigative bureaus such as the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, CAPA, Hexagone and Médiawan, Estelle chose to work as a freelance journalist. With this experience, Estelle moved on to directing for Golden News. This was an opportunity for her to take the time to investigate and write the documentary until it was edited, during three years. In the field, strong encounters have taught her to tell beautiful stories with this sensitivity that allows her to approach the intimacy of her characters. Determined and committed to investigative journalism and transmission, Estelle leads short film workshops for Civic Fab with children in the suburbs.


Table ronde : How will AI and digital technologies contribute to making agriculture more sustainable?
Friday 6 may 2022, 9h15

Will artificial intelligence improve the performance of agriculture? How accurately can we predict environmental impacts, track organisms, or prevent disease? Robots, data sensors, and other diagnostic tools are providing more and more data to agricultural producers, but is it useful and valued? Would there be benefits to sharing data in the agricultural sector?

Fabrice Fischer Fabrice Fischer
Company manager

Entrepreneur, technologue, conférencier, enseignant, auteur, Fabrice Fischer a fondé Blu (2016), une société de conseil en IA active à Hong Kong et à Montréal. Il a travaillé dans la finance et l'informatique en Asie, en Europe et en Amérique du Nord. Directeur financier de Sentient Technologies (San Francisco et Hong Kong), l'une des entreprises d'IA les mieux financées au monde, il a contribué au lancement de Sentient Investment Management, un fonds spéculatif basé sur l'IA. Il a commencé par créer une société de services informatiques à Hong Kong, puis a rejoint Bain & Co, à Paris. Il a été directeur financier et directeur de l'exploitation de Bryan Garnier, une banque d'investissement européenne. Fabrice Fischer est co-auteur de "The Future of Finance - the impact of FinTech, AI, and Crypto on Financial Services", édition Palgrave. Il a enseigné l'IA pour les entreprises au niveau du master à l'université de Hong Kong, à la HKU of Science and Technology et à l'École de technologie supérieure de Montréal. Il est titulaire d'une licence en génie électrique de l'École Polytechnique de Montréal et d'un MBA de l'INSEAD (France).


Conference : Does Augmented Design Thinking have limits?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 15h15 - 16h — Amphi orange

Whatever the current craze around A.I. and the acceleration of scientific advances that we attribute to it, we can ask ourselves if Augmented Design Thinking (ADT) will allow us to go beyond our current design limits and develop automatic innovation processes ad infinitum? If a positive answer seems obvious for incremental innovations, what about disruptive innovations? Design Thinking is an innovation process based on our recognized human needs, but whose spiral never stops growing. We always want more. Will the development of ADT accompany this evolution? Or will it have technological limits? And will it make it easier to satisfy our needs or will it push us far beyond our real and reasonable needs? The question remains fundamental from a technological point of view, but also from an ethical and even philosophical one. Will ADT lead us to design cyborg’s bioalgorithms in the metaverse and ultimately disconnect us from the real world?

Fatima Amara Fatima Amara
Energetic researcher

Fatima Amara is a researcher at Hydro-Quebec since 2021. She holds a postdoc in CanmetEnergy in 2020 and Concordia University in 2019. She had also a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Quebec at Trois-Rivières (UQTR), Trois-Rivières, QC, Canada, in 2018. Her research interests are modeling and quantification of the energy flexibility of residential, institutional, and commercial buildings, forecasting the electrical loads and building energy efficiency. Fatima works actually on transactive energy system, where customer participants can trade electricity on the grid. Through this system, traditional consumers of electricity can generate electricity and sell their excess capacity back into the grid.


Table ronde : How can we use AI as a catalyst for innovation in the energy transition?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 15h15

Today, the topic of artificial intelligence is part and parcel of discussions in many sectors of society and the economy: image and speech recognition, machine translation, image generation, etc. This is in large part thanks to impressive advances in the last decade of machine learning and in particular deep learning applications. With the growing electrification of the energy mix and the diversification of generation sources— intermittent, variable and distributed—we are just scratching the surface of the potential for AI to accelerate the transition to ultra-efficient, low-emission and interconnected energy systems. New AI opportunities are fascinating and innovative, but they also raise many questions. Is artificial intelligence the best solution to accelerate the energetic transition? How do we consider the challenges of implementing an AI solution, such as robustness, bias and explainability, in order to avoid the potential lack of trust that is difficult to offset a posteriori? How do we set up a certification process for AI solutions to allow them to be used in highly regulated environments? How do we optimize the energy and resources used by AI itself, for learning and data storage, as we strive to meet climate change challenges?

Ferdaous Dorai Ferdaous Dorai
Responsible for the AI program

Ferdaous Dorai is responsible for Datapreneur, the AI program, and the Scientific Entrepreneurship program. She holds a PhD in fluid mechanics from the Institut Polytechnique de Toulouse and a certificate in innovation management from HEC Montréal. Ferdaous has been working with startups for more than 5 years and has 6 years of experience in applied research and R&D. Through CEuMONTREAL's entrepreneurial programs, she accompanies entrepreneurs and entrepreneur-researchers with projects from the ideation to the commercialization phase, in various areas. Passionate about innovation and new technologies, she contributes to setting up new initiatives to help bridge the gap between the worlds of research and business and facilitate the adoption of new innovations.


Conference : What is the reality of AI startups?
Friday 6 may 2022, 9h15 - 10h — Amphi orange

Today, more and more startups are choosing to integrate AI to build their solution. For these companies, there are several opportunities and new initiatives that encourage them, however, there are also many challenges and issues that should not be overlooked. So what are these issues? How can we be aware of them to minimize their effects on the sustainability of the company? The challenges are varied: when to integrate AI into the solution, the degree of market readiness to adopt this solution, the estimation of the steps that lead to the integration of AI, or even the formulation of the benefit for the customer who only sees the solution that meets his need and not the core of the AI. In addition to all this, there are other aspects such as the ethical side or the recruitment of AI talents for a startup. During this conference, examples of practical cases of startups will be presented.

Foutse Khomh Foutse Khomh
Full Professor of Software Engineering

Foutse Khomh is a Full Professor of Software Engineering at Polytechnique Montréal, Canada CIFAR AI Chair on Trustworthy Machine Learning Software Systems, and FRQ-IVADO Research Chair on Software Quality Assurance for Machine Learning Applications. He received a Ph.D. in Software Engineering from the University of Montreal in 2011, with the Award of Excellence. He also received a CS-Can/Info-Can Outstanding Young Computer Science Researcher Prize for 2019. His research interests include software maintenance and evolution, machine learning systems engineering, cloud engineering, and dependable and trustworthy ML/AI. His work has received four ten-year Most Influential Paper (MIP) Awards, and six Best/Distinguished Paper Awards. He also served on the steering committee of SANER (chair), MSR, PROMISE, ICPC (chair), and ICSME (vice-chair). He initiated and co-organized the Software Engineering for Machine Learning Applications (SEMLA) symposium and the RELENG (Release Engineering) workshop series. He is co-founder of the NSERC CREATE SE4AI: A Training Program on the Development, Deployment, and Servicing of Artificial Intelligence-based Software Systems, and one of the Principal Investigators of the DEpendable Explainable Learning (DEEL) project. He is on the editorial board of multiple international software engineering journals and is a Senior Member of IEEE.


Conference : What are the challenges in ensuring the quality of AI-enabled software?
Friday 6 may 2022, 12h15 - 13h — Amphi bleu

Machine learning is increasingly deployed in large-scale and even mission-critical systems thanks to recent advances in machine learning and artificial intelligence. Software applications incorporating machine learning are now used in everyday life: finance, energy, health, and transportation. The traditional approach to software development is deductive, consisting of writing rules that dictate the behavior of the system with a coded program. In machine learning, these rules are instead inferred inductively from training data. This makes it difficult, if not impossible, to understand and predict the behavior of software components, and thus also to adequately verify them. In this talk, we will discuss the challenges to overcome in order to develop trustworthy AI systems.

François-Philippe Champagne François-Philippe Champagne
Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry

The Honourable François-Philippe Champagne, Member of Parliament for Saint-Maurice—Champlain and Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry was first elected in 2015. He has previously served as Minister of Foreign Affairs, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, Minister of International Trade and parliamentary secretary to the Minister of Finance. Minister Champagne is a businessman, lawyer, and international trade specialist with over 20 years’ experience at large international companies in Europe, particularly in the fields of energy, engineering, and innovation. Before entering politics, Minister Champagne was Vice-President and Senior Counsel of ABB Group, a leader in cutting-edge technology that operates in more than 100 countries. He also served as Strategic Development Director, acting General Counsel, and Chief Ethics Officer and Member of the Group Management Committee of Amec Foster Wheeler, a world leader in the energy sector. In 2009, Minister Champagne was named Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum. He has served on several boards over the years, and was notably President of the Canadian-Swiss Chamber of Commerce and the Banff Forum. Minister Champagne holds a Bachelor of Laws from the University of Montréal and a Master of Laws in American law from Case Western Reserve University. Minister Champagne also studied public and private international law at The Hague Academy of International Law, in the Netherlands.


Conference : Opening session
Thursday 5 may 2022, 9h15 - 10h — Amphi bleu

François William Croteau François William Croteau
Senior Director Strategy and Innovation

François William Croteau was mayor of the Rosemont-Petite-Patrie borough and member of the executive committee of the City of Montreal in charge of the smart city, information technologies, innovation and higher education. François has led major projects in ecological transition as well as ethical and responsible digital transformation that have led to distinctive achievements such as the Montreal Urban Innovation Lab, which notably allowed the City to win the "Canadian Smart Cities Challenge" competition in 2019. His vision based on the principles of open innovation, social acceptability, citizen participation and organizational social responsibility enriches his work in helping municipalities transform, foster innovation, improve the quality of life in communities and increase the competitiveness of businesses. With an Executive MBA and a PhD in Urban Studies from UQAM, François also brings his expertise in urban governance and data development to bear on building more innovative and resilient organizations. François is currently a Senior Director in the Strategy and Innovation Consulting team at Innovitech, working on urban projects and smart cities.


Conference : Can the public actor guarantee a responsible and ethical use of AI in health?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30 — Amphi bleu

Information and communication technologies (ICT) are evolving at a very fast pace. Over the last few years, several transformations have brought about important new capabilities that can offer new opportunities in terms of speed and capacity of analysis and data transfer. Faced with this rapid deployment of ICT, citizens are legitimately questioning the security of their data and the value of their use. On the one hand, public actors see strategic opportunities to improve services to citizens, and on the other hand, private companies see capacities to accelerate industrial and commercial innovation. However, public administrations do not have the capacity to compete with GAFAM in the deployment of these new ICTs. Deep learning has revolutionized artificial intelligence (AI). But with the arrival of 5G technology, we see the emergence of a gigantic capacity to transfer data faster, but also in greater quantities. It is in this context of opportunity for the improvement of services to citizens, among others in health, that public actors must equip themselves with an ethical and responsible digital architecture to reassure the population, guarantee social acceptability and protect themselves against the unequal fight with GAFAM.


Table ronde : How to make AI truly democratic?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 10h45

The dialogue around artificial intelligence is still too elitist. Complex terms, expert debates, ethical questions between academics... But how can we put AI and data back at the heart of a pluralistic exchange, truly open and accessible to the greatest number? The round table organized by the Fonds de recherche du Québec will bring together citizens to start a new dialogue on AI and data. How can we ensure that diverse populations understand the foundations of AI, its impacts and its challenges? How do we ensure that these technologies are developed in response to the needs of people and communities and in service of the public interest? What are the best practices to support the effective participation of citizens in data exploitation projects? These are some of the questions that will fuel the discussions of this roundtable and the exchanges with the public.

Frank Pasquale Frank Pasquale
Expert on the law of AI

Frank Pasquale is an expert on the law of AI, algorithms, and machine learning. He is a Professor of Law at Brooklyn Law School, an Affiliate Fellow at Yale University's Information Society Project, and a member of the American Law Institute. He was recently recognized as the third most cited U.S. law professor in the field of Law & Technology, based on the Sisk study's 2016-2020 reporting period.He is co-editor-in-chief of the Journal of Cross-Disciplinary Research in Computational Law (CRCL), based in the Netherlands, and a member of an Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence on Automated Decision-Making & Society (ADM+S). His book The Black Box Society: The Secret Algorithms That Control Money and Information (Harvard University Press 2015) has been recognized as a landmark study on the law and political economy of information. His New Laws of Robotics: Defending Human Expertise in the Age of AI (Harvard University Press 2020) rethinks the political economy of automation, to promote human capacities as the irreplaceable center of an inclusive economy.

Frédéric Bouchard Frédéric Bouchard
Professor of Philosophy

A full professor in the Department of Philosophy at the Université de Montréal, Frédéric Bouchard has been the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at the Université de Montréal since June 2017. A philosopher of science and philosopher of biology, his interdisciplinary research focuses on the theoretical foundations of evolutionary biology and ecology as well as on the relationship between science and society. He was Associate Vice-Rector for Research, Discovery, Creation and Innovation at the University of Montreal, and the first holder of the ÉSOPE Chair in Philosophy (2014-2016). He is a member of the Interuniversity Research Center on Science and Technology and served as its director (2014-2015). He was elected President of the Association francophone pour le savoir (ACFAS) for a two-year term (2015-2017) and was President of the Canadian Philosophical Association. He is also involved in several organizations working to advance research. He is a member of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) and the MILA. He currently chairs the Board of Directors of the Érudit platform and of the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec (BAnQ).


Table ronde : How to make AI truly democratic?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 10h45

The dialogue around artificial intelligence is still too elitist. Complex terms, expert debates, ethical questions between academics... But how can we put AI and data back at the heart of a pluralistic exchange, truly open and accessible to the greatest number? The round table organized by the Fonds de recherche du Québec will bring together citizens to start a new dialogue on AI and data. How can we ensure that diverse populations understand the foundations of AI, its impacts and its challenges? How do we ensure that these technologies are developed in response to the needs of people and communities and in service of the public interest? What are the best practices to support the effective participation of citizens in data exploitation projects? These are some of the questions that will fuel the discussions of this roundtable and the exchanges with the public.

Gautier Depambour Gautier Depambour
PhD student in science's history

Former student of the French engineering school CentraleSupélec, Gautier Depambour is currently studying History and Philosophy of Science at Paris VII University. During his gap year, he had the opportunity to work as an intern for five months at CERN within the communication group of the ATLAS detector. Meanwhile, he has lead a Machine Learning project on particle physics. He has also spent six months in the Quantum Cavity Electrodynamics group in the Kastler-Brossel Laboratory (Collège de France, Paris) for his Masters degree in nanophysics. Finally, he feels passionate about explaining and helping others understand science. He is involved in several projects such as the website of the French physicist and philosopher Etienne Klein. He also wrote a book to tell his experience at CERN, called Une Journée au CERN.


Table ronde : Will AI invent the jobs of tomorrow?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 9h15

The current trend in university and vocational training programs is to expand disciplines and adjust student quotas according to employment forecasts. This pragmatism is certainly legitimate from the point of view of the needs of the economy and the supply of jobs for new entrants to the labour market. However, is it prudent in relation to the importance of fundamental research in the development of knowledge and its applications in societies that are evolving more and more rapidly? Can AI anticipate the upheavals in social behaviors that are constantly changing demand? Can it predict the emergence of new jobs and the disappearance of others? Can it invent a future? Can it make it inevitable?

Gérard Oury Gérard Oury
Consultant

Gérard Oury has been active in the industrial world for over thirty years. He has spent the last 25 years of his professional life as a consultant and sales manager with CETIM (Centre Technique des Industries Mécaniques), the largest R&D center for industry in France. He has met with executives from virtually every sector of the manufacturing industry in France and Europe. The activities addressed were essentially around supply chain optimization, mechanical manufacturing, design and re-design, but also validation tests, technical feasibility studies. The projects initiated were mostly strategic. He has been responsible for a variety of accounts and markets, including aerospace (airplanes, helicopters, launchers, equipment manufacturers), transportation (automotive, rail), and luxury goods (watches and perfumes). He has experienced and participated in the accompaniment of companies from mass production to the transition to small and medium series production tending towards the "made-to-measure". Today, he accompanies large industrial companies in their search for sources of technical and commercial diversification.

Gheorghe Comanici Gheorghe Comanici
Research Scientist

Gheorghe Comanici is a Research Scientist in the DeepMind Montreal team. His research is focused mainly on Hierarchical Reinforcement Learning for building AI agents to assist mobile device users. He received his PhD in Artificial Intelligence at McGill University, with a focus on mathematical models for sequential decision making. After graduating from McGill, he joined Google in 2016 to study the use of AI for assistive features in the Chrome Browser. In 2018 he joined the Montreal DeepMind team where he is following his passion for fundamental research in AI and the practical use of AI to improve access to information and education.


Table ronde : How can AI applications improve the life of Quebecers and Canadians?
Friday 6 may 2022, 16h

From smartphones and chatbots to predicting how protein molecules fold, AI is a technology that is already transforming many aspects of our lives. It has already been integrated in a number of applications and we expect it to be even more present in the coming years. How will these applications change our lives? Which areas in our society will benefit most from this? Will we see improvements in the life of all Canadians or will the benefit be limited to a subset?

Guillaume Dumas Guillaume Dumas
Assistant professor of computational psychiatry

Guillaume Dumas is Assistant Professor of Computational Psychiatry at the Faculty of Medicine of the Université de Montréal and Director of the Precision Psychiatry and Social Physiology Laboratory of the CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center. He holds the IVADO Chair in "AI and Mental Health", the FRQS J1 grant in "AI and Digital Health" and is an associate academic member of Mila - l'Institut Québécois d'Intelligence Artificielle. He holds an engineering degree in advanced engineering and computer science (École Centrale Paris), two master's degrees (theoretical physics, Université Paris-Saclay; cognitive sciences, ENS/EHESS/Paris 5), a PhD in cognitive neuroscience (Sorbonne University), and the Habilitation à Dirigée de Recherche (HDR) in medicine (Université de Paris). His work is at the crossroads of social neuroscience, systems biology, and artificial intelligence. He studies the embodied and reciprocal nature of human cognition that encompasses biological, behavioral and social levels. His team develops new approaches to psychiatry, from digital tools for assessment and rehabilitation to mathematical modeling for clinical decision making.


Conference : How to make AI more social?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 11h30 - 12h15 — Amphi mauve

Every day, millions of human beings interact with algorithms. However, this interaction is far from being at the level of those offered by human social cognition. Since the very invention of computing, it is no coincidence that the "Turing test" advocates social interaction as a means of determining whether a machine is intelligent on the same level as a human being. Since the 1950s, technical advances have improved the capabilities of algorithms, and some have even passed the Turing test with some judges. But these experiments have shown that pretending to be a human being does not necessarily require sophisticated cognition; a few sociolinguistic tricks can easily be used to fool most people. But then, what makes human cognition so unique? Why is this social dimension so important? How can we improve AI algorithms to make them more sociable? Between multi-brain neuroscience and neuro-inspired AI, we will try to highlight the scientific challenges and societal opportunities of social AI. We will also discuss the philosophical and ethical issues associated with this convergence between human and machine.

Hervé Chneiweiss Hervé Chneiweiss
Neurologist

Hervé Chneiweiss is a neurologist and neuroscientist, MD-PhD, Research Director at the CNRS. He is currently head of the research centre Neuroscience Paris Seine (CNRS /Inserm/Sorbonne University). Trained as a neurologist (movement disorders, neurogenetics), his scientific work was mainly dedicated to the biology of astrocytes and in the recent period their roles in brain tumour origin, progression and plasticity, identifying new metabolic drivers and therapeutic avenues. He has authored more than 170 academic papers. He is also involved in bioethics, presently chair Inserm Ethics Committee (IEC) and UNESCO International Bioethics Committee, member WHO advisory committee on developing global standards for governance and oversight of human genome editing and vice-chair of ARRIGE, expert OECD for recommandation 457 on neurotechnology in health. He wrote several books or chapters on bioethics of human embryos, stem cells, genetics and neuroscience.


Conference : Will artificial intelligence take over our brains?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 16h - 16h45 — Amphi mauve

Brain activity is the basis of our thoughts, emotions and actions. Brain activity provides information inherent to all human beings, regardless of gender, nationality, language or religion. The centrality of brain activity to notions of identity, freedom of thought, autonomy, privacy and human flourishing makes it of paramount importance to analyze the ethical, legal and societal impact of recording ("reading") and/or modulating ("writing") brain activity through various devices and procedures collectively referred to as neurotechnologies. These techniques, which make extensive use of algorithms, are being developed to enable researchers and clinicians to improve our understanding of the human brain and to solve the riddles of its diseases, which account for a third of our health care expenditures, is a major priority. At the same time, brain data is becoming a sought-after commodity beyond the academic and medical sectors: wellness, digital phenotyping, affective computing, neurogaming... This extra-medical availability of individual brain data requires a reinforced framework. Risks include re-identification, hacking, unauthorized reuse, invasion of mental privacy and confidentiality, digital surveillance, and other misuses. The recent report of UNESCO's International Bioethics Committee identifies dangers to cognitive freedom, mental privacy, mental integrity and psychological continuity, which are already protected in principle by existing human rights, but need to be more explicitly respected in light of the development of neurotechnologies.


Signing : L'identité : dictionnaire encyclopédique
Thursday 5 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30
Signing : Notre cerveau
Thursday 5 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30

Hervé Fischer Hervé Fischer
Artist and multimedia philosopher

Multimedia artist and philosopher Hervé Fischer initiated Sociological art in1971 and practices since 2011 tweet art and tweet philosophy. His work has been presented in numerous art museums and biennales. The Centre Pompidou has devoted to him a retrospective Hervé Fischer and sociological art in 2017. Pioneer of the digital revolution in Quebec, he cofounded the Cité des arts et des nouvelles technologies de Montréal in 1985, the first Cybercafé in Canada, the Télescience Festival, Science for All. His research focuses on art, sociology of colors, the digital revolution , social imagination, hyperhumanism. He created the Quebec Media lab Hexagram. He is the author of many books including Théorie de l’art sociologique (1977), L’Histoire de l’art est terminée (1981), Digital Shock (2002), CyberProméthée, l’instinct de puissance (2003), La planète hyper, de la pensée linéaire à la pensée en arabesque (2004), The Decline of the Hollywood Empire (2005), La société sur le divan (2007), L’Avenir de l’art (2010), La divergence du futur (2014), La pensée magique du Net (2014), Market Art (2016), Les couleurs de l’Occident. De la Préhistoire au XXIe siècle (2019), L’Âge hyperhumaniste. Pour une éthique planétaire (2019). He is the founder of the International Society of Mythanalysis.


Conference : Mythanalysis of AI: should we desire our own death?
Friday 6 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30 — Amphi mauve

There is a distinction between weak and strong AI, but many believe that the weak one is already so powerful that the strong one will soon follow. Weak AI does not pose a metaphysical problem: as gigantic as its results, its extensions, its computational and human challenges in our social governance may be, it will never be more than human intelligence assisted by computers. Quantum computers will multiply its power and deep self-learning capacity, but weak AI will never be aware of its processes nor of decisional emotion. These attributes that the human imagination naively confers to it would make it inoperative. A bug, but no computer singularity, whatever the guru entrepreneurs of posthumanism say. The strong AI, on the contrary, which claims to see the emergence of artificial intelligences capable of consciousness and emotions, which feeds science fiction, these kinds of "spiritual machines" desperately hoped for by Ray Kurzweil, constitute a toxic fabrication which is a matter of mythanalytic therapy. To believe in them is to desire one's own death!


Signing : L'Age hyperhumaniste : pour une éthique planétaire
Thursday 5 may 2022, 16h - 16h45

Hiba Daghar Hiba Daghar
PhD candidate in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Sciences

Hiba is a PhD student in neuroscience at the University of Montreal, in Dr. Parker's laboratory. Her project concerns the characterization of rare congenital diseases. She is studying, among others, neurodevelopmental disorders in C. elegans. Beyond her studies, Hiba is also interested in science popularization and mental health issues. In her spare time, she enjoys reading, traveling and hiking.

Hubert Reeves Hubert Reeves
Astrophysicist

Hubert Reeves is a French Canadian astrophysicist and popularizer of science. He obtained a BSc degree in physics from the Université de Montréal in 1953, an MSc degree from McGill University in 1956 with a thesis entitled "Formation of Positronium in Hydrogen and Helium" and a PhD degree at Cornell University in 1960. From 1960 to 1964, he taught physics at the Université de Montréal and worked as an advisor to NASA. He has been a Director of Research at the Centre national de la recherche scientifique since 1965. In 1994, he was made Officer of the National Order of Quebec. He was promoted to Grand Officer in 2017. His most important publications include: Patience dans l'azur (1981) and Poussières d’étoiles (1984), Là où croît le péril… croît aussi ce qui sauve (2013), Le Banc du temps qui passe (2017).


Conference : Opening session
Thursday 5 may 2022, 9h15 - 10h — Amphi bleu

Ilona Logvinova Ilona Logvinova
Associate General Counsel

lona Logvinova is Associate General Counsel at McKinsey & Company, within McKinsey Digital, working closely with advanced analytics, AI/ML, cloud strategy and enablement, and digital transformations across a range of industries. Prior to joining McKinsey, Ilona was Senior Counsel at Mastercard, where she worked on ground-up technology builds and tech transactions to leverage the company’s core assets and explore broader partnership opportunities. Prior to Mastercard, Ilona was an Associate at Fried Frank, where she specialized in leveraged finance representing borrowers and lenders in secured and unsecured financings. Ilona has a BA from Columbia University with a joint major in Economics and Philosophy and her JD from the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law.


Conference : How should we view human responsibility with increased automation?
Friday 6 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30 — Amphi orange

The word cyborg—a combination of “cybernetics” and “organism”—describes an emerging hybrid of machines and humanity. As the tech-enabled augmentation of daily life normalizes, society is becoming increasingly more comfortable with tech being a part of individuals in a deeply integral way. The tension and nuance of humanity and automation is being explored via the emergence of “cyborg law”, codifying the idea that the "law will have to accommodate the integration of technology into the human being", providing rights and protections for both the person and the technology increasingly making up our personhood. But in addition to focusing on rights, should the focus expand to include responsibilities? As cyborg law evolves to protect the machine in our human-machine integration, like through privacy laws—particularly those regarding AI—perhaps we should also work to understand where the machine may have decision-making power instead of the human, and allow for an increasing gap in responsibility, ultimately giving rise to a debt for liability incurred but unaccounted for. This session explores the meaning of automation in AI, emerging risk mitigation tools such as ethical AI frameworks, and the importance of structuring a tailored, thoughtful and contextual approach to responsible AI and ML automation.

Ingrid Peignier Ingrid Peignier
Engineer

Ingrid Peignier is a graduate engineer from the École des Mines d'Alès in France and holds a master's degree (M.Sc.A.) in industrial engineering from the École Polytechnique de Montréal. She has been working at the Centre interuniversitaire de recherche en analyse des organisations (CIRANO) for 21 years. She is currently the Senior Director of Partnerships and Research Development at CIRANO. Ms. Peignier specializes in the identification, assessment, management and communication of risks in various fields such as the transportation of hazardous materials, underground infrastructure failures and the risk of food fraud. Since 2011, she publishes, with Nathalie de Marcellis-Warin, the annual Barometer on the perception of risks in Quebec. She is currently working on several projects in the food industry, in particular the Baromètre de la confiance des consommateurs québécois à l'égard des aliments (Barometer of Quebec consumers' confidence in food) and various studies on the digital transformation in the agricultural sector.


Table ronde : How will AI and digital technologies contribute to making agriculture more sustainable?
Friday 6 may 2022, 9h15

Will artificial intelligence improve the performance of agriculture? How accurately can we predict environmental impacts, track organisms, or prevent disease? Robots, data sensors, and other diagnostic tools are providing more and more data to agricultural producers, but is it useful and valued? Would there be benefits to sharing data in the agricultural sector?

Inoussa Balma Inoussa Balma
PhD student in neuroscience

Inoussa Balma holds a doctorate in medicine from the University of Ouagadougou and is passionate about neuroscience research. Inoussa was destined for a career in a university hospital. After graduation in 2016 and two years of medical practice, Inoussa left his country for Canada to build the research component of his project. He has always been particularly interested in the etiopathogenic and pathophysiological brain mechanisms behind autism spectrum disorders. His goal is to contribute to the discovery of new therapeutic avenues and to the implementation of more effective and safe management strategies. Inoussa is currently enrolled in a neuroscience thesis at the University of Montreal and is working towards a better understanding of the mechanisms of processing and integration of neural information by the pyramidal neurons of the cerebral cortex in Phelan-McDermid syndrome.

Irina Rish Irina Rish
Researcher in computer science

Irina Rish is an Associate Professor in the Computer Science and Operations Research Department at the Université de Montréal (UdeM) and a core faculty member of MILA - Quebec AI Institute. She holds Canada Excellence Research Chair (CERC) in Autonomous AI and a Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) Canada AI Chair. She received her MSc and PhD in AI from University of California, Irvine and MSc in Applied Mathematics from Moscow Gubkin Institute. Dr. Rish's research focus is on machine learning, neural data analysis and neuroscience-inspired AI.  Before joining UdeM and MILA in 2019, Irina was a research scientist at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, where she worked on  various projects at the intersection of neuroscience and AI, and led the Neuro-AI challenge. She received multiple IBM awards, including IBM Eminence & Excellence Award  and IBM  Outstanding Innovation Award in 2018, IBM Outstanding Technical Achievement Award in 2017, and IBM Research Accomplishment Award in 2009. Dr. Rish holds 64 patents,  has published over 80 research papers in peer-reviewed conferences and journals, several book chapters, three edited books, and a monograph on Sparse Modeling.


Conference : Remembering The Bitter Lesson: Is Scale “All You Need” for Achieving Artificial General Intelligence (AGI)?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 10h - 10h45 — Amphi rouge

Modern AI systems have achieved impressive results in many specific domains, from image and speech recognition to natural language processing and mastering complex games such as chess and Go. However, they often remain inflexible, fragile and narrow, unable to continually adapt to a wide range of changing environments and novel tasks without "catastrophically forgetting" what they have learned before, to infer higher-order abstractions allowing for systematic generalization to out-of-distribution data, and to achieve the level of robustness necessary to "survive" various perturbations in their environment - a natural property of most biological intelligent systems, and a necessary property for successfully deploying AI systems in real-life applications. In this talk, we will provide a brief overview of some approaches towards making AI more general and robust. Furthermore, we briefly discuss the role of scale, and summarize recent advances in training large-scale unsupervised models, such as GPT-3, CLIP, DALL-e, which demonstrate remarkable improvements in generalization to novel data and tasks. We also emphasize the importance of developing an empirical science of AI behaviors, and focus on rapidly expanding field of neural scaling laws, which allow us to better compare and extrapolate behavior of various algorithms and models with increasing amounts of data, model size and computational resources.

Isabelle Ouellet-Morin Isabelle Ouellet-Morin
Professor at the School of Criminology

Isabelle Ouellet-Morin is a professor at the School of Criminology of the Université de Montréal, holds the Canada Research Chair on the Developmental Origins of Vulnerability and Resilience and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. As a researcher at the Research Centre of the University Institute of Mental Health of Montreal and at the Groupe de recherche et d'intervention psychosociale (GRIP), she examines the genetic, epigenetic, hormonal, behavioural and environmental mechanisms underlying the vulnerability and resilience of children, adolescents and young adults who are confronted with adversity to suffer from mental problems and behavioural disorders. She studies these issues notably through cohorts of children followed prospectively from birth to adulthood, quasi-experimental designs and randomized trials. She co-directs the Axel Centre - a gas pedal of technological intelligence in mental health - and is responsible for the Social Innovation axis of the Observatoire pour l'éducation et la santé des enfants (OPES), where she supports the development and dissemination of (techno)social innovations dedicated to supporting, in concert with community stakeholders, the optimal development of young people and to promoting their resilience, particularly those living in an adversarial context.


Conference : Is AI useful to better understand child development and intervene?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30 — Amphi rouge

Understanding the influences of a multitude of risk and protective factors - from genes to socio-cultural influences - anchored in time and exerting themselves in an individual, sequential and synergistic way on the developmental trajectories of children is the ambition that developmental psychopathology has set itself. Several insights have marked this discipline, based essentially on inferential statistical models. But is this sufficient? Other approaches, such as those related to machine learning, could provide a different perspective on these etiological models by proposing alternative arrangements of these factors (equifinality), making it possible to develop more personalized interventions. Several organizations, such as UNICEF, are seeking to identify the opportunities and challenges related to the use of artificial intelligence to better support children's development, including personalized tools to support academic success or better emotional regulation. These questions will be addressed through the lens of the +Fort mobile application, designed to support young victims of bullying. The challenge for this and many other applications is to keep youth engaged so that they have the desired impact, including more interactive, personalized, and real-time features that increase their effectiveness. This work shows the emergence of an interface between digital solutions and mental health issues to which AI is called upon to contribute.

Jacques Arnould Jacques Arnould
Ehics expert

Jacques Arnould is an engineer in agronomy and forestry, with a Ph.D. in History of Sciences as well as a Ph.D. in Theology. He researches the interrelation between sciences, cultures, and religions, with a particular interest in two areas: life sciences and space exploration. With respect to the first area, he has written several books on the historical and theological dimensions of the life sciences, with a special emphasis on evolution. With respect to the conquest of space, since 2001 he has served as ethics advisor to the Centre national d'études spatiales (CNES), the French space agency. Dr. Arnould has served as adjunct faculty with the International Space University since 2000, and he is an elected member of the International Academy of Astronautics. In 2004 he was awarded the Labruyère Prize from the Académie Française, and in 2011 the received the Audiffred Prize from the Académie des sciences morales et politiques. In addition to authoring numerous books in French, he has published Gene Avatars: The Neo-Darwinian Theory of Evolution (2002), God vs Darwin: Will the Creationists Triumph over Science? (2009), Icarus’ Second Chance: The Basis and Perspectives of Space Ethics (2011) and God, the Moon, and the Astronaut (2015).


Conference : Do you know the smell of the comet?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 9h15 - 10h — Amphi mauve

The human species has the itch, it is sometimes said; and the explorers are the most restless specimens. Their exploits attract crowds and their stories fill our libraries. Astronauts are the most recent to conquer the heights of popularity. However, thanks to robots and their artificial intelligences, we are exploring territories that are not only unknown but, for a long time to come, forbidden. Thanks to them, will we all become explorers? And will we have to confer on our machines the status of envoys of humanity? But to whom will we send them? And with what message?

Janet Kavandi Janet Kavandi
Astronaut

Dr. Janet Kavandi is the President of Sierra Space Corporation. The Dream Chaser® spaceplane is under contract to deliver supplies to the International Space Station beginning in 2023. Sierra Space is also partnered with Blue Origin to place a commercial space station (Orbital Reef) in orbit by 2028. Before coming to Sierra Space, Dr. Kavandi served 25 years at NASA. She was Director of NASA’s Glenn Research Center and prior to that, Director of Flight Crew Operations and Deputy Director of Health and Human Performance at the Johnson Space Center. Dr. Kavandi was selected as a NASA astronaut in 1994 and flew on three space shuttle missions. Dr. Kavandi logged 33 days in space and 13.1 million miles in 535 Earth orbits. Dr. Kavandi earned a BS from Missouri Southern State University, an MS from the Missouri University of Science and Technology, and her Doctorate in analytical chemistry from the University of Washington. Dr. Kavandi received two Presidential Rank Awards, two NASA Outstanding Leadership Medals, two Exceptional Service Medals, three NASA Space Flight Medals, and the Distinguished Service Medal. She was inducted into the Astronaut Hall of Fame in 2019. Dr. Kavandi and her husband, John, have two children.


Table ronde : Could AI make decisions instead of the control centers or the astronaut?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 10h45

Astronauts must place total trust in the programming of their flights, which includes numerous self-checking procedures to correct itself, and warning devices to request human intervention. We are now witnessing fully automated flights with passenger-tourists with no specific skills. Human intervention is still possible, but only to a certain extent, in case of unforeseen events, and human intelligence remains assisted by AI. Astronauts are trained to eventually take full programmatic control in case of a major accident, such as a fire, depressurization, breakdown, or the impact of space waste. This has already happened. Would they blindly trust an artificial intelligence?

Janice Bailey Janice Bailey
Scientific Director, Fonds de recherche du Québec

Janice L. Bailey obtained a Ph.D. in animal reproduction from the University of Guelph in 1992 and a postdoctoral position in reproductive biology from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1994. As a researcher, she is attached to the Centre de recherche en reproduction, développement et santé intergénérationnelle of Université Laval, as well as the Réseau québécois en reproduction, one of the 38 strategic clusters supported by the FRQNT. Her research focuses on the influence of the environment, including exposure to toxic substances and nutrition, on reproductive capacity and functions in different generations.


Table ronde : A.I., videogames, interdisciplinary research : key ingredients for rich & safe digital lives ?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 14h30

No-code or Low code is a technology trend allowing people to create software applications with accessible interfaces instead of having to write lines of code. In 1995, there were 31,000 web pages on the Internet. Today, there are tens of billions of pages. One of the main reasons has been the democratization of accessible tools that do not require technical skills to launch a website. Over the past 5 years, there has been a strong trend for video games to engage players as part of the gaming experience, either through user-generated content features or as as a social vector. During this time, the industry has learned how to make the most of deep learning or reinforcement learning to assist game creators or open up new gaming experiences. Over the past 5 years, most work on AI has focused on creating sophisticated algorithms based on existing datasets. These algorithms have reached a level of maturity that unlocks the possibility of creating new behaviors based solely on data engineering. Virtual worlds have been a playground of choice to develop and refine A.I. before applying it into the real world. Over the past 5 years, the academic community has become increasingly aware of the importance of interdisciplinary research, with landmark achievements such as the creation of OBVIA (International Observatory on the Societal Impacts of AI and digital) in 2019 or the grant AUDACE from FRQ which promotes interdisciplinary research in 2017. The video game industry is the perfect example of an interdisciplinary activity, because a video game is the alchemy of design, programming, art, social sciences, etc. What if AI & video games reinforced there bounds within a mature interdisciplinary ecosystem? What if state of the art in A.I. and the know-how of the video game industry offered more accessible content creation tools to populate rich open virtual worlds? What if this was the next evolution for AI and video games? Montreal, the province of Quebec and Canada have long relied on these disciplines. What if when and where he should be here, now?

Jean-Christophe Baillie Jean-Christophe Baillie
Founder of Novaquark and researcher in AI

Jean–Christophe Baillie is a French scientist and entrepreneur. He founded the ENSTA ParisTech Robotics Lab where he worked on developmental robotics and computational evolutionary linguistics. While at ENSTA, he designed the urbiscript programming language to control robots, which became the base technology of Gostai, a robotics startup he created in 2006, which has been acquired by Aldebaran Robotics in 2012. More recently, he founded Novaquark, a video game development studio, developing emergent systemic gameplay and being at the forefront of massively mutiplayer online game concepts. Novaquark is currently gearing up to release Dual Universe, the first single-shard Sci-Fi first person sandox MMORPG game with editable content and emergent gameplay. Jean–Christophe Baillie holds a degree from the École Polytechnique in Paris where he studied computer science and theoretical physics. He did his PhD in Artificial Intelligence and Robotics at Université Pierre & Marie Curie in co-supervision with Luc Steels at the Sony Computer Science Lab in Paris.


Conference : Is the infant the new model for Artificial Intelligence?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 12h15 - 13h — Amphi bleu

Modern AI has made tremendous progress in the last decade, but remains mostly focused on extracting regularities and patterns out of very large corpus of data. It currently lacks a deep understanding of the underlying concepts contained within the flow of data. What do we mean by understanding? What is the source of meaning? How do people learn language and the meaning of words? It turns out that a promising source of inspiration is to look at young infants as they develop and acquire cognitive and social skills in their early years. Based on interactions of a physical body in a physical world, stable mental structures are built out of concrete sensorimotor patterns, and are shared through social interaction, paving the way to language. This grounded and interaction-focused approach is called developmental AI and could open new opportunities to develop common sense reasoning, causality understanding and explainability in future AI systems.

Jean-François Bélisle Jean-François Bélisle
Executive Director and Chief Curator

Executive Director and Chief Curator of the Musée d'art de Joliette since April 2016, Jean-François Bélisle is known for his sharp artistic vision, unwavering charisma, political activism and philanthropic innovation. He has made the MAJ more accessible than ever to the marginalized, migrant and First Nation communities, establishing a real dialogue with them and actualizing the principle of inclusiveness. Dedicated to the advancement of financial recognition for museum institutions on a provincial and national level, he sits on numerous boards and committees for local and regional development, including the boards of Tourisme Lanaudière, the Canadian Art Museum Directors' Organization (CAMDO), the Greater Joliette Chamber of Commerce, and the annual Parlez-moi d'amour event organized by Les Impatients, as well as the City of Joliette's Cultural Revival and Branding committees. Jean-François Bélisle holds a B.A. and an M.A. in art history from Concordia University [Montreal, Canada]. His Master's thesis focused on the international reception of the exhibitions shown in the Canadian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale between 1986 and 2005.


Conference : Migrations: Where Have We Come From? Where Are We Going? & How Much Choice Do We Have?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 12h15 - 13h — Amphi rouge

In this presentation British artist Mat Chivers and Jean-François Belisle, director and chief curator at Musee d'Art de Joliette, Quebec will give an overview of Migrations - a sculptural project developed for the Musee d'Art de Joliette in collaboration with Element AI. 1,480 human hand imprints were digitally scanned and the 3D data was used to train an Artificial Intelligence built specifically for the project to understand what forms are created when we grasp a piece of clay. The AI then output its own imprint based on this learning, creating a file that was used to program a robot to cut the shape of the AI imagined hand imprint into stone. The resulting sculptural form is a composite object made from pieces of a type of stone known as impactite which was created when a meteorite struck Québec 350 million years ago. A conversation will follow that expands on some of the themes explored in the sculpture including the role of a haptic relationship with the world in human evolutionary process, the migration of consciousness across material boundaries and agency and authorship in the contemporary moment.

Jean-François Clervoy Jean-François Clervoy
Astronaut

Jean-François Clervoy, successively active French, NASA and European astronaut for 33 years ranks as brigadier general from DGA (Defense procurement agency) reserve. Born in 1958, JFC graduated from Ecole Polytechnique in 1981, from SupAero college of Aeronautics in 1983 and from Test flying school in 1987. He flew on three missions aboard the space shuttle: in 1994 to study the atmosphere, in 1997 to resupply the Russian space station Mir, and in 1999 to repair the Hubble space telescope. Then JFC worked as senior advisor for the ESA human space flight programs and is chairman of Novespace which organizes weightlessness parabolic flights aboard the Airbus A310 ZERO-G. He is author, inventor and professional speaker. He is member of several organizations for the promotion of space exploration and for the protection of planet Earth.


Table ronde : Could AI make decisions instead of the control centers or the astronaut?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 10h45

Astronauts must place total trust in the programming of their flights, which includes numerous self-checking procedures to correct itself, and warning devices to request human intervention. We are now witnessing fully automated flights with passenger-tourists with no specific skills. Human intervention is still possible, but only to a certain extent, in case of unforeseen events, and human intelligence remains assisted by AI. Astronauts are trained to eventually take full programmatic control in case of a major accident, such as a fire, depressurization, breakdown, or the impact of space waste. This has already happened. Would they blindly trust an artificial intelligence?


Signing : Histoire de la conquête spatiale: "50 ans après Apollo 11, on décide de reconquérir la Lune pour préparer les voyages vers Mars"
Thursday 5 may 2022, 12h15 - 13h

Jean-Gabriel Ganascia Jean-Gabriel Ganascia
Engineer and philosopher

An engineer and philosopher by training, Jean-Gabriel Ganascia then turned to computer science and artificial intelligence. In 1983, he defended a doctoral thesis on knowledge-based systems at the University of Paris-Sud (Orsay), and in 1987, also at the University of Paris-Sud, a State thesis on symbolic learning. Professor of computer science at the Faculty of Science of Sorbonne University, he continues his research at LIP6 where he leads the ACASA team. A specialist in artificial intelligence (EurAI Fellow), machine learning and data mining, his current work focuses on the literary side of digital humanities, on computational ethics and on the ethics of information and communication technologies. He is a member of the CNPEN (Comité National Pilote d'Éthique du Numérique) and president of the ethics committee of Pôle Emploi and the orientation committee of the CHEC (Cycle des Hautes Études de la Culture). He chaired the CNRS ethics committee from 2016 to 2021. During his career, he has published more than 500 articles in conference proceedings, books and scientific journals. He is also the author of several works of reflection intended for the general public, the last of which, Servitudes virtuelles, will be published by Éditions du Seuil in March 2022.


Conference : Is AI a liberation and/or an enslavement?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 16h - 16h45 — Amphi mauve

Artificial intelligence automates the hardest tasks, those that for centuries consumed so many human lives spent at the plow, the mine or the workbench. We can then hope that machines will soon help men to free themselves from the most arduous tasks and that the human condition will be greatly improved. However, a close look at the contemporary world and its evolutions shows that new forms of enslavement are emerging. Fewer irons and dungeons, no doubt; nevertheless, the pressure that is exerted on people does not diminish; the constraint remains, even if the yoke becomes virtual, and thus more elusive. Coercion is no longer exercised solely by mechanical means; it is also, and above all, imposed on a cognitive level, on our minds. This makes it necessary and urgent to reflect on the social and political consequences of information and communication technologies and on the means of freeing ourselves from the new forms of oppression that they generate.


Signing : Ce matin, maman a été téléchargée
Saturday 7 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30
Signing : Le Mythe de la Singularité
Saturday 7 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30
Signing : Servitudes virtuelles
Saturday 7 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30

Jean-Louis Dessalles Jean-Louis Dessalles
Artificial intelligence researcher

Jean-Louis Dessalles is a lecturer-researcher at Telecom Paris (Institut Polytechnique de Paris).
He works in particular on the theory of simplicity and its applications to cognitive sciences.
He is the author of several books, including a recent book in which he exposes the limits of artificial intelligence.


Conference : Can AI imitate cognitive mechanisms without copying them?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 14h30 - 15h15 — Amphi orange

How far can statistical techniques based on neural networks mimic human intelligence? For some, it’s already a done deal: statistical AI performs certain intellectual tasks better than the best human specialists, be it Go players or dermatologists. And yet, neural networks have, by design, a considerable handicap: they have to learn everything in advance, using huge sets of examples. They are incapable of adapting to the current context, except when that context closely resembles some learned situation. Humans, by contrast, rely on a variety of cognitive mechanisms that they use on the fly, for example to understand what is meant by a sentence like “She’s not even sick”. The challenge of statistical AI is to replicate intelligence by extrapolating from data, without any understanding of its underlying mechanisms. This strategy is inherently limited. We will need to "reverse engineer" cognitive mechanisms to go beyond that.


Signing : Des intelligences TRÈS artificielles
Thursday 5 may 2022, 15h15 - 16h

Jean-Louis Israël Jean-Louis Israël
Layer

Jean-Louis Israël is an attorney at the Paris Bar. He holds a DEA in general private law from the University of Paris II, Panthéon-Assas, a DESS in common market law from the University of Paris I, Panthéon-Sorbonne and a degree in History and Geography from the University of Paris X Nanterre.

Jean-Maxime Larouche Jean-Maxime Larouche
Ph.D candidate in neurosciences

Jean-Maxime Larouche is the CEO and co-founder of Hippoc.ai, but also a Ph.D candidate in cognitive computational neuroscience at the University de Montréal. He specializes in Neuro-AI, a field of research that involves combining neuroscience and artificial intelligence to reproduce and understand the human brain and cognition. Jean-Maxime is the recipient of numerous research and excellence grants. An entrepreneur at heart, he also has extensive experience in managing IT research and development teams in academia and industry


Table ronde : Will AI invent the jobs of tomorrow?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 9h15

The current trend in university and vocational training programs is to expand disciplines and adjust student quotas according to employment forecasts. This pragmatism is certainly legitimate from the point of view of the needs of the economy and the supply of jobs for new entrants to the labour market. However, is it prudent in relation to the importance of fundamental research in the development of knowledge and its applications in societies that are evolving more and more rapidly? Can AI anticipate the upheavals in social behaviors that are constantly changing demand? Can it predict the emergence of new jobs and the disappearance of others? Can it invent a future? Can it make it inevitable?

Jean-Noël Nikiema Jean-Noël Nikiema
Professor in the Department of Management, Evaluation and Policy

L’intelligence artificielle promet de redéfinir le système de santé pour le rendre encore plus efficient. Dans les secteurs de l’économie, des banques, de l’industrie l’impact de l’IA est une chose palpable; en santé, les choses semblent aller moins vite. La COVID-19 a accentué ce ressenti, car l’IA a peu contribué à la réponse contre le virus dans de nombreux pays. Malgré l'enthousiasme et les financements publics et privés, la place prise par l'IA dans la santé reste limitée même si les espoirs restent grands. Surestimer la place de l'IA en santé pourrait conduire à un nouvel hiver. Cette présentation aborde cette question de la place de l’IA en santé en mettant l’accent sur la matière première de l’IA en santé : les données de santé. Le développement et le déploiement efficient de l’IA en santé passe par une meilleure prise en compte de la donnée. Pour un déploiement réussit de l’IA en santé, nous verrons comment donner de l’amour à nos données autant qu’aux modèles que nous construisons.


Conference : Can we really create Artificial Intelligence from health data?
Friday 6 may 2022, 13h45 - 14h30 — Amphi orange

Artificial intelligence promises to redefine the healthcare system to make it even more efficient. In business, banking, and industry the impact of AI is a palpable thing; in healthcare, things seem to be moving slower. COVID-19 has accentuated this feeling, as AI has contributed little to the response against the virus in many countries. Despite the enthusiasm and public and private funding, the place of AI in health remains limited, even if hopes remain high. Overestimating the place of AI in health could lead to a new winter. This presentation addresses this question of the place of AI in health by focusing on the raw material of AI in health: health data. The development and efficient deployment of AI in health requires a better consideration of data. For a successful deployment of AI in health, we will see how to give love to our data as much as to the models we build.

Jean-Paul Delahaye Jean-Paul Delahaye
Mathematician

Jean-Paul Delahaye is Professor Emeritus at the University of Lille and a researcher at the CRISTAL laboratory (Centre de recherche en informatique signal et automatique de Lille, UMR CNRS 9189). His work focuses on sequence transformation algorithms (Thesis), on the use of logic in Artificial Intelligence (expert systems, Prolog language), on the computational theory of games (iterated games, simulation of social systems, study of cooperation), and on algorithmic information theory (Kolmogorov complexity theory, computational centent) with applications to bioinformatics and finance. He is currently working on cryptographic currencies and "blockchain technology". He is also interested in ethical issues in science and was a member of the CNRS Ethics Committee (COMETS) from 2016 to 2021. He has supervised 20 theses. He is the author 22 books, some of which are intended for a wide public. In 1998, he received the Prix d'Alembert from the Société Mathématique de France and, in 1999, the Prix Auteur de la Culture scientifique from the Ministry of National Education and Research. He writes the monthly column Logique et calcul (6 pages) in the journal Pour la science (French version of Scientific American). He also runs a blog (http://www.scilogs.fr/complexites/) dedicated to "Complexities".


Conference : Can the same ethics be appropriate for all forms of intelligence?
Friday 6 may 2022, 9h15 - 10h — Amphi rouge

Must the various forms of intelligence necessarily fight against each other, humans enslave AIs, AIs take power over humans, the various possible thinking beings in the universe engage in endless battles? The answer is perhaps no, and to understand this we must make a detour through the theory of complexity as Andreï Kolmogorov, Gregory Chaitin and Charles Bennett have presented it to us. A universal ethic likely to be naturally imposed on all is deduced from this vision of the world ordered by measures of complexity. It is in fact already at work within us. We just need to become aware of it.

Jean-Philippe Uzan Jean-Philippe Uzan
Cosmologist

Jean-Philippe Uzan is director of research in theoretical physics at the CNRS. Specialist in gravitation and cosmology, he works at the Paris Institute of Astrophysics. He was deputy director of the Institut Henri Poincaré from 2013 to 2017. He has published more than a hundred research papers on many aspects of cosmology, from the most theoretical to the interpretation of the most recent observations. He received the Paul Langevin Prize (2010) and the prestigious Georges Lemaître Prize (2015). He has taught for several years at the École normale supérieure de Paris and the École des mines de Paris, as well as in international thematic schools. He has been collaborating with the University of Cape Town in South Africa for the past 15 years. In 2017, he publishes The Secret Harmony of the Universe and Big Bang in 2018.


Conference : What happens to the scientific method in the age of AI?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 14h30 - 15h15 — Amphi mauve

Artificial intelligence offers powerful new tools for the natural sciences with many promises, in particular due to the explosion in the volume of observations and the quality of numerical simulations, which it allows to exploit in new and efficient ways. quality of numerical simulations, which it allows to exploit in new and efficient ways. A reflection on the way this tool modifies our practice is necessary, in particular on its link with the scientific method. The scientific method is a set of reasoned procedures that allow us to reach a goal for our practice, a guide that has constantly evolved by adapting to new goals, new disciplines and new tools. Using a few examples, this presentation will illustrate how the lines between empiricism and rationalism and our goals between describing, predicting and understanding have evolved in recent years, with an emphasis on formalizing the scientific question and linking modeling and data.

Jean-Sébastien Steyer Jean-Sébastien Steyer
Researcher - Paleontologist

Jean-Sébastien Steyer is paleontologist at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle (MNHN), Paris. He is working on Life before the dinosaurs, with special emphasis on Pangean faunas, and on extinct species reconstruction. Beyond his research articles, he also writes popular books such as "Earth before the dinosaurs" (Indiana Univ Press, 2010) and popular articles about sciences in science-fiction. Between two fieldworks in Africa and Asia, this National Geographic Grantee is also chronicler in the French version of "Scientific American".


Conference : Is artificial intelligence natural?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 16h - 16h45 — Amphi orange

AI is the set of disciplinary fields whose goal is the realization of programs simulating human intelligence. It is therefore to the brain what robotics is to the hand: an attempt to simulate and solve tasks (robota in Czech or task in English in the definition of Marvin Lee Minsky). Even if, according to John McCarthy (creator of the term), AI is more a game (of logic, chess, etc.) than a task, this field remains an extension of the human brain. However, this brain has a long and complex evolutionary and contingent history of several hundred million years. This history, which has been identified by paleontology and developmental biology (embryology), is not often integrated into AI studies - although the SIGEVO (Special Interest Group on Genetic and Evolutionary Computation) is partially addressing it. A better understanding of this history would allow us to better simulate the complex interactions of the human brain. This is what is proposed here: we will dive into the ocean of the origins, about 505 million years ago (Middle Cambrian), and swim with Pikaia, a kind of sea slug that evokes the very first "fish" with a skull (group of "Craniates"), as is the case of the hagfish today (jawless fish). At the same time, embryology tells us that the skull is only an anterior vertebra "imploded" like a popcorn and protecting the nexus of neurons that is the brain. The cranial cavity also gathers all the sensory bulbs (olfactory, visual, nasal): intelligence, if it had to be defined, is also a question of relationships with the environment and with others: cephalopods, social insects, cetaceans, chimpanzees, it is no longer the property of man or even of the brain since there are neurons in our intestines! Finally, the evolutionary mechanisms at play in the history of the vertebrate brain (paleoneurology) allow us to better understand what intelligence is... and to realize that we are trying to model a concept that escapes us.


Signing : Anatomie comparée des espèces imaginaires : de Chewbacca à Totoro
Saturday 7 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30
Signing : La Terre avant les dinosaures
Saturday 7 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30
Signing : Les Mondes Perdus - Une nouvelle préhistoire
Saturday 7 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30

Jérôme Waldispühl Jérôme Waldispühl
Computer science teacher

Jérôme Waldispühl is Professor of Computer Science at McGill University, where he conducts research in bioinformatics. His expertise ranges from the design of algorithms for RNA structural biology to the development of massively parallel human-computer systems to accelerate discovery in molecular biology. With the release of Phylo DNA puzzles in 2010, he is one of the pioneers in the use of video games promoting direct public participation in genomic data analysis. Since 2020, he has collaborated with MMOS, Gearbox Software and CCP games with whom he simultaneously published the participatory science games Borderlands Science in Borderlands 3 and Project Discovery 3 in Eve Online. These initiatives have brought together millions of online players and generated hundreds of millions of annotations for research on the microbiome and COVID-19. Jérôme Waldispühl holds a PhD in computer science from École Polytechnique (France). Before joining McGill in 2009, he was a lecturer in applied mathematics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2006-2009) and previously a post-doctoral fellow in the Biology Department at Boston College (2005-2006).


Conference : Will AI make it possible to harness the collective intelligence of video game players in the service of science and genomics?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 11h30 - 12h15 — Amphi orange

Over the past decade, the use of video games to stimulate user participation in the analysis of scientific data has become a common practice. This approach is particularly attractive in molecular and cell biology when it comes to classifying or identifying patterns present in genomic data that cannot be precisely determined by conventional algorithms. However, this approach faces scaling problems with the continuous increase in the size of the data to be processed. One solution is to integrate these scientific activities into mainstream video games to ensure mass participation and to capitalize on machine learning techniques to exploit and automate the collective intelligence of the participants. We illustrate these concepts with the Borderlands Science participatory science project conducted in collaboration with Gearbox Software, MMOS, and the University of California at San Diego, with the support of Genome Canada and Genome Quebec. Borderlands Science is a Tetris-like puzzle integrated into the popular video game Borderlands 3. In less than a year, the initiative has gathered more than 2 million participants and collected 80 million solutions that will accelerate research on the human microbiome.

Jian Tang Jian Tang
Deep learning researcher

Jian Tang is an assistant professor in the Department of Decision Sciences at HEC Montréal, as well as a senior academic member at Mila, the Institut Québécois d'Intelligence Artificielle. He holds a Canada - CIFAR Research Chair in AI. His main research interests are deep learning, reinforcement learning, graph representation learning, natural language understanding, recommender systems and drug discovery. During his PhD, he received the Best Paper Award at the 2014 ICML conference; in 2016, he was nominated for the Best Paper Award at the World Wide Web (WWW) Data Mining Conference; in 2020, he received the Amazon and Tencent Faculty Research Award. He is one of the most representative researchers in the field of graph representation learning and has published a representative body of work in this area such as the LINE and RotatE algorithms. The algorithm he developed on node representation learning, LINE, has been widely recognized and is the most cited paper at the WWW conference between 2015 and 2019. Recently, his group just released an open-source platform for drug discovery called TorchDrug, aiming to make AI drug discovery software and libraries freely available to the research community. He is a senior referee for the ICML and NeurIPS conferences.

Joé T. Martineau Joé T. Martineau
Assistant professor of organizational ethics

Joé T. Martineau is an assistant professor of organizational ethics in the Department of Management at HEC Montréal. Her research, teaching and organizational intervention interests focus on ethics and governance issues affecting private, public and health sector organizations. Her work has led her to reflect on the composition and effectiveness of ethics programs and the diversity of ethical management practices in organizations, on the various factors that influence the ethical reflection and behavior of organizational actors, and on the ethical issues related to the digital transition and the development and deployment of artificial intelligence in organizations. She is an associate member of the Research Unit in Pragmatic Health Ethics, Clinical Research Institute of Montreal (IRCM), a regular member of the Institute of Applied Ethics (IDEA), Laval University, and a regular member of the International Observatory on the Societal Impacts of AI and Digital Technologies (OBVIA).


Conference : What are the ethical issues related to the development and deployment of AI in healthcare?
Friday 6 may 2022, 13h45 - 14h30 — Amphi rouge

Artificial intelligence applications in health care offer many potential benefits, but also generate risks and raise several ethical issues. Indeed, the rapid evolution of artificial intelligence technologies, the uncertainty of their impact on individuals and on our societies, as well as the lack of regulations governing them, require a deep reflection on the ethical issues raised by the development of artificial intelligence systems (AIS), as well as on our position regarding their use and deployment in the health sector. In this conference, we will address the ethical issues related to the exploitation of massive data needed to train AI algorithms. Then, we will present the main ethical issues related to the development and use of AIS in health, addressing how these systems impact our lives and the physical and social environment in which we live.

Joseph Adrien Emmanuel Demes Joseph Adrien Emmanuel Demes
PhD in Public Health

Dr. Demes is a medical doctor and professor at the School of Medicine and Pharmacy. He teaches the following classes: Evaluation of Intervention, Public Policy Analysis (postgraduate), Epidemiology, and Quality Management (pre-service). Dr. Demes got his Master’s in Public Health degree at the Prince Leopold Institute of Tropical Medicine (Belgium, Antwerp). He just finished his Ph.D. in Public Health from the University of Montreal, Canada. He has more than 16 years of work experience (Africa, Haiti). His research focuses on the factors that influence the implementation of continuous quality improvement initiatives. He is interested in rigorous evaluations of health interventions, implementation science, and public policy analysis.

Joséphine Jobard Joséphine Jobard
Illustrator

With her literary high school diploma (baccalauréat) in hand, Joséphine joined the Ecole Boulle in 2016. After three years of study, just turning 21 years of age, she obtained her Diploma in Artistic Woodcarving (Diplôme des Métiers d’Art), with an innovative project mixing shadows and sculpture. From academic drawing, to comic strips, to sketchbooks and travel books; illustration is an important part of her everyday life.

Julie Hlavacek-Larrondo Julie Hlavacek-Larrondo
Astrophysicist

Professor Julie Hlavacek-Larrondo is an internationally renowned expert in the study of supermassive black holes. She is an associate professor in the Department of Physics at the Université de Montréal and her work has had a major impact on the understanding of the coevolution of galaxies and black holes. After completing her bachelor's and master's degrees at the Université de Montréal, Julie Hlavacek-Larrondo obtained a Ph.D. in astrophysics at the University of Cambridge. D. in astrophysics from the University of Cambridge, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University as a NASA Einstein Fellow. In addition to receiving a host of research awards, including a Canada Research Chair, Julie Hlavacek-Larrondo has been awarded senior scientist time on the world's largest telescopes. She is also a strong advocate for diversity and co-founded the Parité sciences project


Conference : Will AI be able to see the invisible, pierce the unfathomable, bring infinity closer?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30 — Amphi mauve

What is invisible, but can be seen? What seems unfathomable, but which we manage to uncover? What is infinitely small, but can affect the infinitely large? Don't let the name fool you: black holes are not just empty space. They are the strangest and most fascinating objects in the universe, so strange that Einstein himself did not believe in their existence. However, it is now established, beyond any doubt, that black holes exist and that they play a fundamental role in the Universe. Filled with an exceptional amount of energy, they can easily and quickly destroy entire galaxies. This conference will focus on the most massive black holes in the Universe, the titans among the giants, and will present the most recent discoveries on these objects. It will show the revolutionary role that AI is playing in observational astrophysics and more particularly in black hole astrophysics, irrevocably contributing to the expansion of the universe of the possible.

Julie Payette Julie Payette
Astronaut

From 1992 to 2011, Julie Payette worked as an astronaut and flew two missions in space. She also served many years as CAPCOM at NASA’s Mission Control Center in Houston and was Chief Astronaut for the Canadian Space Agency. Following her space career, she became active in the development of public policies and promotion of science and technology. From 2011 to 2016, she was a scholar at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC and CEO of the Montreal Science Center. She also served on numerous public and non-profit boards, was a member of the women in sports commission of the International Olympic Committee and produced scientific outreach short programs on Radio-Canada. Julie Payette iserved as Canada’s 29th Governor General from 2017 to 2021. Ms. Payette is a member of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec and the International Academy of Astronautics. She has obtained a Bachelor of Electrical Engineering from McGill University, and a Master in Computer Engineering from the University of Toronto. Julie Payette has received many distinctions and holds 28 honorary doctorates. She is a Knight of the Ordre national du Québec. and a Companion of the Order of Canada.


Table ronde : Could AI make decisions instead of the control centers or the astronaut?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 10h45

Astronauts must place total trust in the programming of their flights, which includes numerous self-checking procedures to correct itself, and warning devices to request human intervention. We are now witnessing fully automated flights with passenger-tourists with no specific skills. Human intervention is still possible, but only to a certain extent, in case of unforeseen events, and human intelligence remains assisted by AI. Astronauts are trained to eventually take full programmatic control in case of a major accident, such as a fire, depressurization, breakdown, or the impact of space waste. This has already happened. Would they blindly trust an artificial intelligence?

Julien Crowe Julien Crowe
Senior Director, Artificial Intelligence

Leader for more than 15 years in technology and artificial intelligence, Julien has joined National Bank in 2016. He has contributed to the insight-driven cultural transformations of multiple large Canadian organizations in finance and health care, while in parallel implementing data intelligence applied research academic-industrial partnerships. Julien graduated with a doctorate from HEC Montreal and is a member of the advisory boards for the advanced training programs Fin-ML and SE4AI.


Conference : How to make an organization AI-ready?
Friday 6 may 2022, 9h15 - 10h — Amphi mauve

Widely recognized Machine Learning & DevSecOps methodologies used to push AI systems in production are not a 100% recipe for success. We will explain how change management, a continuous learning approach and a strong collaboration culture can be much more important than state of the art technical frameworks to successfully deploy in production. We will illustrate this reality through two dimensions : (1) the integration of software delivery platforms to scale the deployment of new business applications and (2) the deployment of the business applications themselves such as a series of dialog applications and a multi-purpose machine learning risk model. We will close this talk by highlighting key areas with space for progress to continue increasing the successful adoption of AI software by businesses.

Juvenal Bosulu Juvenal Bosulu
Doctoral student in applied human sciences

Juvenal Bosulu is a PhD student at the University of Montreal. His PhD is interdisciplinary and his research focuses on the neural substrates for distinguishing needs and wants. How these states attribute value to stimuli, control choice/action selection and how they contribute to behavior (motivation). Juvenal uses fMRI meta-analytic tools to find differences and similarities between needs and wants, as well as the computational framework of Reinforcement Learning to see how stimuli related to need versus want are valued, in order to influence choice and action selection. Juvenal Bosulu has a background in economics, following his bachelor's and master's degrees.

Karim Benyekhlef Karim Benyekhlef
Director of the Cyberjustice Laboratory

Karim Benyekhlef has been a professor at the Faculty of Law of the Université de Montréal since 1989. He has been seconded to the Centre de recherche en droit public since 1990 and was its director from 2006 to 2014. He was the director of the Regroupement stratégique Droit, changements et gouvernance, which brings together some fifty researchers, from 2006 to 2014. He was also Scientific Director of the Centre d'études et de recherches internationales de l'Université de Montréal (CÉRIUM) from 2009 to 2012. He is currently the director of the Cyberjustice Laboratory, which he founded in 2010. The Cyberjustice Laboratory was awarded the Prix Mérite Innovation by the Quebec Bar in 2015. He has held the LexUM Research Chair in Legal Information since October 2014. He received the Advocatus Emeritus distinction from the Quebec Bar in 2016. He was the 2019-2020 holder of the Alexandre Koyré Chair of Excellence. He is co-leader of the Law, Cyberjustice and Cybersecurity Axis at OBVIA (International Observatory on the Societal Impacts of AI and Digital). He now leads the project "Empowering Judicial Actors through Cyberjustice and Artificial Intelligence" (AJC Project) as part of the SSHRC Partnership Program (2018-2025). This project aims to put artificial intelligence (AI) at the service of litigants and judicial actors to increase access to justice. AJC brings together, for 7 years, a multidisciplinary and international team composed of more than 50 researchers and 42 partners representing research centers, public institutions, legal professionals, civil society representatives and private sector actors.


Conference : Is there a fair use and a real utility of AI in justice?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 10h45 - 11h30 — Amphi mauve

The promises of AI are numerous and are sometimes more about marketing (promise economy) than reality. What about the contribution of AI in the field of justice? The expression "augmented intelligence" seems more accurate in the field of justice. Indeed, it is more a question of assisting the litigant or the professional than of replacing the decision-makers, as illustrated by the chimerical and absurd image of the judge-robot. Digital tools can contribute to a better access to law through conversational agents, for example, and to facilitate, in certain cases, access to justice, in particular through online conflict resolution platforms. In all these cases, the task is difficult because law is not easily encapsulated in algorithmic formulas. The sensitivity of the law to the socio-economic and even political context makes it evolving and sometimes difficult to grasp, and these characteristics are far from being defects. Once these characteristics are taken into account and weighed, augmented intelligence can contribute to access to law and justice and thus do useful work.

Karim Jerbi Karim Jerbi
Researcher in neuroscience

Karim Jerbi is a professor at the Psychology department of the University of Montreal. He is Canada Research Chair in Computational Neuroscience and Cognitive Neuroimaging and heads UNIQUE, the Quebec Neuro-AI research center. He is a member of the Royal Society of Canada's College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists. He obtained a PhD in Cognitive Neuroscience and Brain Imaging from the Pierre & Marie Curie University in Paris and a biomedical engineering degree from the University of Karlsruhe (Germany). His research lies at the crossroads between cognitive, computational and clinical neuroscience. The multidisciplinary research conducted in his laboratory combines magnetoencephalography (MEG), scalp- and intracranial electroencephalography (EEG) with advanced signal processing and data analytics including machine learning. Several ongoing projects in his lab use electrophysiological brain recordings to examine changes in the dynamic properties of large-scale brain networks in various states of consciousness, goal-directed behavior and decision-making. Dr Jerbi also has a keen interest in the convergence between AI, brain science, creativity and art.


Conference : Is Neuro-AI the next revolution in science and technology?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 9h15 - 10h — Amphi orange

Artificial Intelligence (AI) originally emerged as a conceptual challenge (can we build machines that think like humans?) with radical technological, scientific and philosophical implications. Despite initial inspiration by knowledge about the architecture and elementary functional units of the brain, recent years have seen methods such as artificial neural networks grow into a thriving field of their own, with little input from state-of-the-art brain science. Indeed, most of the recent successes in AI are credited to ever more complex algorithms that thrive on the availability of exponentially increasing amounts of data and computational power. Despite its increasing complexity however, current AI is still far from reaching human-level performance for most applications. For example, on many tasks, highly trained complex machine learning algorithms still fall short of the performance of human infants with little or no prior exposure to the task. There is a growing consensus today that the next paradigm shift in AI will depend critically on innovative joint investigations of biological and machine intelligence, paving the way for next-generation AI algorithms that achieve human-level intelligence. Concurrently, Neuro-AI synergies enhance model-driven and data-driven approaches in brain research. Therefore, by expanding our understanding of the principles that govern natural intelligence, we are getting better at designing AI systems that solve similar problems, and vice-versa.

Karine Gentelet Karine Gentelet
Associate Professor in the Department of Social Sciences

Karine Gentelet holds the Abeona-ENS-Obvia Chair in Artificial Intelligence and Social Justice and is an Associate Professor in the Department of Social Sciences at the Université du Québec en Outaouais (UQO). Her research interests and publications focus on the recognition of Indigenous Peoples' rights, the use of digital technology and artificial intelligence for social justice, research ethics in an Indigenous context and the social responsibility of researchers. She is co-director of a research axis on international relations, humanitarian action and human rights within OBVIA.


Conference : Can citizen participation improve respect for human rights?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30 — Amphi rouge

The increasing use of AI technologies is leading to changes in societal dynamics. People and their experiences are being transposed into spaces in which social interactions, power sharing, accountability and consultation processes must be rethought. The participation of individuals and groups affected by AI technologies in governance has now become indispensable from a democratic and social justice perspective. Their participation is also fundamental to limit and control biases and discriminations related to AI technologies from their conception to their use[1]. All of them express the need, even the urgency, to be not only consulted, but included in the modes of governance since they are, in essence, the first ones affected by these technologies developed and implemented without their expertise and their experiential knowledge as they represent them.

Kimberling Toro Kimberling Toro
Doctoral student in educational sciences

Kingberling Toro is a second-year doctoral student in the Department of Educational Psychology and Andragogy. She is interested in online interactions among students with autism spectrum disorder in a co-modal setting. She received her B.A. in Hispanic Literature from Concordia University and her M.A. in Education from the University of Montreal. She is now an educational consultant at the college level, but when she was a language teacher in high school and adult education, she observed a growing need to support learners with ASD, especially when courses were delivered online.

Kulbir Kaur Ghuman Kulbir Kaur Ghuman
Researcher in the field of materials

Kulbir Kaur Ghuman is an early-career researcher, recently appointed as Assistant Professor at Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Centre Énergie Matériaux Télécommunications (INRS-EMT) and a Tier-2 Canada Research Chair in ‘Computational Materials Design for Energy and Environmental Applications’. She is also the head of Insilico Matters Laboratory equipped with advanced software and computational infrastructure, dedicated to understanding the theoretical underpinnings of the behaviour of complex materials and chemical reactions. She has established several novel structure-property relationships and mechanisms for optimizing fuel cell materials and designing efficient catalysts imperative for mitigating climate change. Her influence in the field of computational materials science is demonstrated through her publications in top-ranked journals such as Nat. Comm., Chem. Rev. Soc., Energy Environ. Sci., Adv. Energy Mater. Currently, she is also spearheading a recently established consortium ‘Computational Energy Materials Design Infrastructure (CEMDI)’ at INRS-EMT that aspires to bring together engineers, material scientists, social scientists, and industrialists to fosters innovation in the area of energy materials research.


Conference : Can AI Solve Climate Change?
Friday 6 may 2022, 14h30 - 15h15 — Amphi rouge

Addressing climate change is one of the most daunting challenges that humanity faces in this century. This significant challenge faced by our global society could be solved if we can find sustainable, efficient, and affordable materials required for net zero emission clean energy technologies. Consequently, many nations and their scientists/institutions aim to discover high-performance materials. However, traditional experimental and computational analysis could evidently take centuries for such discoveries. In this time-sensitive looming catastrophe posed by climate change, the high-speed discovery of energy materials could potentially be resolved via artificial intelligence, as acknowledged by many experts around the world. However, the minds who have succeeded in synthesizing required materials by the use of concepts and principles in chemistry and physics always question if a deep understanding of mathematics is sufficient to conquer the materials discovery world? Can AI pace up the discovery of the green energy materials that are historically discovered by accidents or by well-thought research plan in chemistry, physics, and materials science laboratories?

Laetitia Crémona Laetitia Crémona
Assistant to the Vice-Rector

Laetitia Crémona (PhD, Sorbonne Nouvelle) has been working in research management at the Université de Montréal for nearly 15 years. Her various mandates for the Vice-Rector for Research, Discovery, Creation and Innovation have led her to coordinate, develop and implement numerous strategic projects. In 2017, she notably coordinated the activities of the Orientation Committee to determine the Strategy for the Development of the Quebec Ecosystem in Artificial Intelligence and actively participated in the design of the new governance of Mila. She worked on the establishment of the Inven_T Technosocial Innovation Center, for which she was responsible from 2019 to 2021, and contributed, in this capacity, to the promotion of the Montreal Declaration for a responsible development of AI. Over the past year, she prepared the new Research, Discovery, Creation and Innovation Action Plan 2022-27 of the UdeM. She is also the author of several academic articles on modernist literature, history and cinema and recently co-edited, with Amar Acheraiou, Joseph Conrad and Ethics (2022), distributed by Columbia University Press.

Lapin Lapin
Artist

Heir to a classical culture, Lapin evolves in an environment influenced by his architect father, a painter of the air passionate about Pop Art. He embraces early the active life in Paris, makes his artistic experiences in self-taught through travels. He breaks the barriers between noble and profane practices to establish his own framework of creation, in which he evolves in complete freedom. He sees no boundary between Nature and Technology, he seeks to depict the link that unifies all things through his avatar, the Rabbit. This character speaks of Man, deprived of his cultural framework, expressing himself through his postures and emotions. It is under the emblem of this animal, which allowed Fibonacci to discover the golden number, that Charles continues his quest for a formula to unify the Whole, the tragedy and the ridiculousness of our lives, their correspondences at all scales of the cosmos.

Laurence Honnorat Laurence Honnorat
CEO Innovaxiom

After a background in physical sciences, management and communication and fifteen years of experience in the industry, Laurence Honnorat presides over Innovaxiom, founded in 2007. Innovaxiom, a strategy consulting company, builds and implements projects in science. Laurence Honnorat is also at the origin of the creation in 2012 of Innovaxiom Corp, based in Boston. She is co-founder of the Out Of Atmosphere Foundation for space exploration. In 2016 Laurence created Weneedyourbrain.com, a network of scientific speakers, and in 2017 Icedmoment.com, an exhibition of online photographic collections. In 2018, she launches TimeWorldEvent, a world science congress, and in 2020, the general interest association Ideasinscience.com in response to the eponymous YouTube channel, created in 2011 and of which she is the producer. She works as a strategy consultant, particularly in industry, on issues related to anticipation and in higher education where she addresses the themes of idea emergence, communication and project management. In 2019, she received the Alexandre Ananoff prize from the Société Astronomique de France for her actions in favour of the valorisation of space culture.


Conference : Opening session
Thursday 5 may 2022, 9h15 - 10h — Amphi bleu

Laurence Perreault Levasseur Laurence Perreault Levasseur
Astrophysicist

Laurence Perreault Levasseur is an astrophysicist. She is an assistant professor at the Université de Montréal, a member of Mila and a visiting researcher at the Center for Computational Astrophysics of the Flatiron Institute. She specializes in the development and application of methods embedded in artificial intelligence and deep learning to astrophysical data. She completed her PhD at Cambridge University, where she conducted work on the application of non-equilibrium quantum field theory to the cosmic inflation formalism. She then joined Stanford University as a KIPAC Fellow and the Flatiron Institute in New York as a Flatiron Research Fellow, where her research focused on cosmology and in particular the development of new machine learning techniques for data analysis and constraining cosmological parameters.


Conference : Will artificial intelligence transform our understanding of the universe?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 10h45 - 11h30 — Amphi orange

Although the Concordance Model of Cosmology, called the Standard Model of Cosmology or the Lambda CDM Inflationary Model, has been extremely successful over the past few decades in terms of predictions on a wide range of time and space scales, the nature of its three main components, namely the nature of inflation, dark matter, and dark energy, still remains elusive. In the next decade, a large number of new observatories and large sky surveys will come into operation to try to unravel the nature and properties of these mysterious components. Although they hold great promise for discovery, the volume of data produced by these new observatories will be unprecedented and will exceed our current analysis capabilities. To help lift the veil on some of the greatest mysteries remaining in cosmology, a surprising discovery engine seems to be emerging: artificial intelligence.

Lena Simine Lena Simine
Professor of Chemistry

Lena Simine is an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry at McGill University. She received her PhD in 2015 from the University of Toronto, did postdoctoral work at Rice University, and launched an independent group in 2019 at McGill University. The Simine group works at the intersection of theoretical and computational chemistry, biophysics and materials science. By combining traditional computational techniques with novel artificial intelligence and machine learning methods, it aims to tackle difficult and impactful problems in intellectually exciting ways. Her research is currently supported by NSERC, FRQNT, NRC and CFI-JELF. She is a member of the IVADO-funded research team "AI for Materials and Molecules Discovery".


Table ronde : What is missing in AI today?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 13h45

The field of artificial intelligence has gone through some tough times, most notably known as "AI winters." But over the past decade, we have seen a dramatic rebound, thanks to new capabilities combined with scientific and technological advances. AI is now seen as an enabling technology, with the potential to make an impact in many, many areas. It is often compared to the technologies that fueled the industrial revolutions. Although more and more concrete applications of AI exist, research in the field is far from over. In what areas has AI not yet been exploited to its full potential? At a more fundamental level, what are the limits of current approaches? What are the promising avenues of research and what are the obstacles that seem insurmountable? In short, what is missing in AI today?

Loïc Kevin Kouatchet Ziemi Loïc Kevin Kouatchet Ziemi
Student in environmental geography

Loïc Kevin Kouatchet Ziemi is a second year student in environmental geography at the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières. He is a member of the Student Committee (CIRÉ) of the Conseil supérieur de l'éducation du Québec. He is fascinated by the economy of self-giving and knowledge, entrepreneurship, science, art and humans. Loïc is also the host of the podcast and a student journalist and columnist. He likes to present images of the subjects he deals with in order to create a constructive debate.


Table ronde : How to make AI truly democratic?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 10h45

The dialogue around artificial intelligence is still too elitist. Complex terms, expert debates, ethical questions between academics... But how can we put AI and data back at the heart of a pluralistic exchange, truly open and accessible to the greatest number? The round table organized by the Fonds de recherche du Québec will bring together citizens to start a new dialogue on AI and data. How can we ensure that diverse populations understand the foundations of AI, its impacts and its challenges? How do we ensure that these technologies are developed in response to the needs of people and communities and in service of the public interest? What are the best practices to support the effective participation of citizens in data exploitation projects? These are some of the questions that will fuel the discussions of this roundtable and the exchanges with the public.

Louis-Pascal Xhonneux Louis-Pascal Xhonneux
PhD student in deep learning

Louis-Pascal Xhonneux did his Undergraduate and Masters degrees at the University of Cambridge in Computer Science. His Masters' thesis studied the BGP complexity class in computational complexity. He is currently a third year PhD student with Prof. Jian Tang working on Graph Neural Networks with a focus towards drug discovery and algorithmic reasoning. He has previously interned with Dr. Eoin McKinney and worked on modelling the Type I Diabetes in Children.


Conference : Does geometric deep learning help in drug discovery?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 12h15 - 13h — Amphi mauve

Drug discovery is a very long and expensive process, taking on average more than 10 years and costing $2.5B to develop a new drug. Artificial intelligence has the potential to significantly accelerate the process of drug discovery by extracting evidence from a huge amount of biomedical data and hence revolutionizes the entire pharmaceutical industry. In particular, graph representation learning and geometric deep learning--a fast growing topic in the machine learning and data mining community focusing on deep learning for graph-structured and 3D data---has seen great opportunities for drug discovery as many data in the domain are represented as graphs or 3D structures (e.g. molecules, proteins, biomedical knowledge graphs). In this talk, I will introduce our recent progress on geometric deep learning for drug discovery and also a newly released open-source machine learning platform for drug discovery, called TorchDrug.

Louise Delange Louise Delange
Illustrator

Since her childhood Louise’s studies have been guided by handcrafts and her drawing skills. In 2016 she enters the ESAA Boulle, in Paris, where she spent three years, and recently graduated in chair making. She is currently pursuing her desires of learning and experimenting new techniques through a training in casting and modeling. In parallel she is developing personal projects about drawing, ceramics, botany… keeping a curious eye on intellectual and everyday sciences.

Louisiane Gauthier Louisiane Gauthier
Vice-president - Espace Hubert-Reeves en Charlevoix

Louisiane Gauthier is a clinical child psychologist at the Centres Jeunesse de Montréal and has been an expert witness in court for over 35 years. For two years, she was the Executive Director of the Musée maritime de Charlevoix. Louisiane is currently very involved in various boards of directors. She chairs the Board of Directors of Vision Diversité, whose mission is to promote artistic diversity. She is the vice-president of the Observatoire de la géosphère de Charlevoix and responsible for the development of the Espace Hubert-Reeves-en Charlevoix. Louisiane Gauthier is a member of the board of directors of Les Petits Violons and Ensemble musical Jean Cousineau, a private school that trains students in orchestral performance. In 2007, Louisiane received three awards: the Excellence Award for "constancy in contribution and personal commitment" from the Multidisciplinary Council of Montreal Youth Centres; the Professional Award from the Ordre des Psychologues du Québec 2001; and the Welfare League of Canada Award for the defense of children's rights.

Luc Courchesne Luc Courchesne
Artist and professor

From interactive portraits to immersive apparatuses, Luc Courchesne has created engaging works that have been widely exhibited and collected. He has received numerous awards, including the Grand Prix at the ICC Biennale in Tokyo (1997), the Prix Paul-Émile-Borduas (2019) and Canada’s Governor General’s Award in Media Arts (2021). A graduate of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (1974), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1984), Courchesne is honorary professor at Université de Montréal, lecturer at McGill University, founding member of the Society for Art and Technology and member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts, he is represented by Pierre-François Ouellette Art Contemporain.


Conference : Where do you live?
Friday 6 may 2022, 12h15 - 13h — Amphi rouge

Imagine that the work of connecting and spatializing data in a set is supported by algorithms capable of structuring and organizing a large number of elements, that these scenographies of elements can be upgraded, rearranged, transformed and evolved in real time before your eyes… Imagine the pleasure of observing what is happening from within. The experience would be like coming to life anew, of migrating in yet uncharted terrains, ad hoc theaters of memory, emergent ontological models, to form new existential narratives. Finally, imagine a cross between the Library of Babel by Jorge Luis Borges and the Mertzbau by Kurt Schwitters. The project Ephemeral ontologies: algorithmic generation of explorable worlds aims to bring out new forms of spatialization and retroactive immersive experiences that inform, inspire and transform the relationship to oneself and to the World.

Luc Rabouin Luc Rabouin
Borough Mayor

Luc Rabouin was elected mayor of Le Plateau-Mont-Royal in October 2019. Since December 2019, he has been responsible for economic and business development, and design on the city’s executive committee. Prior to that, Mr. Rabouin was the director of strategic development at the Caisse d’économie solidaire Desjardins, where he held the position for three years. He has also led several organizations, including the Centre d’écologie urbaine de Montréal, Communauto France, as well as the Corporation de développement économique communautaire (CDEC) Centre-sud/Plateau-Mont-Royal, now known as PME MTL Centre-ville. Luc Rabouin holds a Master’s Degree in Political Science from Université de Montréal and a Graduate Diploma in Community Economic Development from Concordia University. In 2009, he published a book titled Démocratiser la ville (Lux Éditeurs).


Conference : Opening session
Thursday 5 may 2022, 9h15 - 10h — Amphi bleu

Luc Sirois Luc Sirois
Chief Innovator of Quebec

Luc Sirois holds a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from McGill University and an MBA from Harvard University. Recognized in Canada and around the world for his creative approach to innovation, M. Sirois is a leader and entrepreneur in digital technology, with investments in numerous startups and non-profit organizations focused on youth, health, science and education. He co-founded the health innovation movement Hacking Health as well as its digital health accelerator and pre-seed fund. He is co-founder of Resonant Medical, now Elekta Canada, a leading manufacturer in the field of radiation oncology and image-guided treatments. He has also served as Vice President of Consumer Health at TELUS Health, Telesystem and Nightingale, and as Manager at McKinsey & Company with offices in Montreal, Toronto, Zurich and Paris. Until recently, he was Managing Director of Prompt, a not-for-profit organization that facilitates R&D partnerships between the industry and research institutions to improve the competitiveness of companies in the ICT, artificial intelligence and other digital technology markets. Mr. Sirois is also strategic advisor to the Minister of the Economy and Innovation of the Quebec government. As such, he currently works on deploying new tech transfer models, on the culture of innovation in institutions, on issues of business creation and scientific entrepreneurship, as well as on the transfer of social innovations and their adoption in society. In December 2020, he was appointed Chief Innovator of Quebec and Director General of the newly created Quebec Innovation Council.


Conference : Is the devil in the data?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30 — Amphi bleu

In progress

Luc Vinet Luc Vinet
General Manager

A former Rector of the Université de Montréal, Executive Vice-Rector and Vice-Rector (Academic) of McGill University, Dr. Vinet has served as Director of the Centre de recherches mathématiques (CRM) since 2013. He is also the Aisenstadt Professor in the Department of Physics at the Université de Montréal. Luc Vinet is the founder of the Mitacs Network of Centres of Excellence and of several other major research networks in Quebec and Canada. A Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and an Officer of the National Order of Quebec, he has received numerous recognitions in Quebec, Canada and around the world for his achievements, including the Armand-Frappier Award of Quebec in particular. His numerous scientific contributions are in various fields of theoretical physics and mathematics. In August 2021, he was appointed Executive Director of the Institute for Data Valorization (IVADO), an initiative of HEC Montréal, Polytechnique Montréal and the Université de Montréal. IVADO, which brings together more than 150 partners from industry, institutions and government, is an advanced research and transfer institute in data science, operations research and artificial intelligence that brings together more than 1400 scientists. Born in Montreal, Luc Vinet holds a PhD from Université Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris and a PhD from Université de Montréal, both in theoretical physics. After two years as a research associate at MIT, he was appointed assistant professor in the Department of Physics at the Université de Montréal in the early 1980s and promoted to full professor in 1992. His work focuses on the exact solution of physical models through the study of symmetries and their description in terms of algebraic structures. Among the many distinctions he has received are the Armand-Frappier prize awarded by the Government of Quebec in 2009 and the ACP-CRM prize for theoretical and mathematical physics in 2012. In addition, he holds an honorary doctorate from the Université Claude-Bernard de Lyon.


Conference : Quantum anyone?
Friday 6 may 2022, 11h30 - 12h15 — Amphi bleu

What role could Quantum Theory play in Artificial Intelligence? The presentation will offer a short overview of advances in this direction and of the challenges that are being faced.

Lyse Langlois Lyse Langlois
General Manager of the OBVIA

D. in Educational Administration and Policy, Lyse Langlois teaches in the Department of Industrial Relations, Human Resources Management Sector. Her research work has allowed her to develop an expertise in organizational ethics. She was Director of Graduate Studies from 2006 to 2011 and has been involved in several committees, either in the Department of Industrial Relations or in the Faculty of Social Sciences: undergraduate and graduate program committees, strategic committee, working group for the constitution of a ARUC, committee for the Excellence Awards for the best thesis and dissertation, sub-committee on research at the Vice-Rectorate. She also served as Associate Dean for Research for the Faculty of Social Sciences before becoming Executive Director of OBVIA in late 2018. The professor was appointed to the Board of Governors of the Center for the Study of Leadership and Ethics at Penn State University in the United States. Professor Langlois is pursuing several research projects in organizational ethics and holds participation in the Strategic Clusters Program (FQRSC) as well as the Major collaborative research initiative program of CRSH.


Conference : What is the place of ethics in the creation of a new algorithmic social?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 10h - 10h45 — Amphi rouge

As algorithms become more and more integrated into our lives through artificial intelligence, we are witnessing - sometimes without our knowledge - the shaping of a new social. Cardon (2015) argues that these systems lead to a new behaviorism that can make social structures disappear. Technological advances, especially in deep learning, lead to algorithms that can be seen as "a mechanism for controlling and regulating an unpredictable system" (Reigeluth, 2018). These algorithmic systems, from their conception, can be the source of profound upheavals, the effects of which cannot be neglected, nor the absence of neutrality. Wanting to encapsulate the social is a bold bet, because it is complex and opens up to a pluralism of reference values. Are we optimizing an existing way of life, or forging an entirely new one? Are we witnessing a technical normativity as an expression of social values? These questions invite us to better understand the place and role of ethics and its real consideration in this new algorithmic social that is taking shape.

Maelenn Corfmat Maelenn Corfmat
PhD student in Law

Maelenn Corfmat is a doctoral student in law, under the joint supervision of Catherine Régis and Anne Debet at the University of Montreal and the University of Paris Descartes. Her research focuses on the legal framework of personal health data throughout the life cycle of artificial intelligence systems in health. Rich in foreign experiences and inspired by several years of practice as a data protection and health compliance lawyer in France and Germany, she has chosen to conduct her research from a comparative perspective between France, Quebec and California. She can also count on the support of various groups and initiatives in which she is involved, such as the Foncer en sciences des données responsables dans le domaine de la santé program, the Canada Research Chair on Collaborative Culture in Health Law and Policy, the H-POD, the Institut parisien Droit et Santé and the Institut québécois d'intelligence artificielle (MILA).


Table ronde : Will AI invent the jobs of tomorrow?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 9h15

The current trend in university and vocational training programs is to expand disciplines and adjust student quotas according to employment forecasts. This pragmatism is certainly legitimate from the point of view of the needs of the economy and the supply of jobs for new entrants to the labour market. However, is it prudent in relation to the importance of fundamental research in the development of knowledge and its applications in societies that are evolving more and more rapidly? Can AI anticipate the upheavals in social behaviors that are constantly changing demand? Can it predict the emergence of new jobs and the disappearance of others? Can it invent a future? Can it make it inevitable?

Manuel Morales Manuel Morales
Data Science Researcher

Manuel Morales is a researcher in data science, applied to the banking and investment sectors. He has experience in creating business value through artificial intelligence. He has been actively involved in several digital transformation initiatives. Manuel conducts his research and teaching activities at the University of Montreal where he is the director of the FinML network, whose project is to train the next generation of finance and banking professionals through AI. He is also very active in the Montreal FinTech ecosystem where he acts as a founder and scientific advisor to a few startups and gas pedals. He holds a PhD in statistics from Concordia University. He is a professor in mathematics and statistics at the University of Montreal since 2005. He is also co-founder and scientific advisor of Project Garambullo.


Conference : Does AI play a role in the preservation of intangible cultural heritage?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30 — Amphi orange

Garambullo: the wild, sweet, purple fruit of a cactus characteristic of semi-desert regions of Mexico. We are not talking about the regions that are semi-desert but the semi-desert region. The "Proyecto Garambulllo" is developing in Querétaro, a small state in north-central Mexico. This citizens' initiative encourages and reactivates community cultural activities that constitute the intangible heritage of the region and its inhabitants. This project aims to be both a driving force and an actor in artistic, cultural and scientific activities that manifest themselves through cultural and culinary heritage. The knowledge, practices and traditions are intimately linked to the semi-desert ecosystem of this region. This project mobilizes digital technologies and Artificial Intelligence tools for both the collection and preservation of this heritage. Digital technologies and Artificial Intelligence are used, not as a tool for the exclusive service of a few, but as a means to explore paths that benefit all; that benefit the common good.

Marc G. Bellemare Marc G. Bellemare
Senior Staff Research Scientist

Marc G. Bellemare leads the Reinforcement Learning (RL) team at Google Research in Montreal. He also holds a CIFAR-Canada Chair in AI at Mila and is an associate professor at McGill University and the University of Montreal. D. at the University of Alberta, where he developed the Arcade Learning Environment, an experimental research platform widely recognized as one of the main drivers of the growth of NL research. A researcher at DeepMind in the UK from 2013 to 2017, he is known for his work on exploration methods, representation learning, and for the distributional method. His work on applying reinforcement learning to stratospheric balloon navigation was recently published in the prestigious scientific journal Nature.


Table ronde : How can AI applications improve the life of Quebecers and Canadians?
Friday 6 may 2022, 16h

From smartphones and chatbots to predicting how protein molecules fold, AI is a technology that is already transforming many aspects of our lives. It has already been integrated in a number of applications and we expect it to be even more present in the coming years. How will these applications change our lives? Which areas in our society will benefit most from this? Will we see improvements in the life of all Canadians or will the benefit be limited to a subset?

Mariane Doucet Mariane Doucet
Ph.D. student in psychology

Mariane Doucet is a second year doctoral student in psychology, research and intervention profile, clinical neuropsychology option. She is interested in the follow-up of concussions in young people in a school context. She is evaluating objective tools, such as quantitative electroencephalography, to detect and monitor the recovery of concussed student-athletes. She received her Bachelor's degree in Psychology from the Université du Québec à Montréal and is now pursuing her graduate studies at the Université de Montréal. In addition to her studies, she works in a research laboratory on infant brain development and is also a teaching assistant. She is particularly interested in the potential clinical application of research data.

Marie-Ève Rancourt Marie-Ève Rancourt
Professor of logistics and operations management

Marie-Ève Rancourt is an associate professor of logistics and operations management at HEC Montréal. She is the Chairholder of the Canada Research Chair in Humanitarian Supply Chain Analytics, and a member of the Interuniversity Research Center on Enterprise Networks, Logistics and Transportation (CIRRELT). Her research interests are in the areas of humanitarian logistics, supply chain design, and transportation management using methodologies rooted in data science. She is working on state-of-the-art methods to support data-driven decision- and policy-making. Her recent work focusses on the use of mathematical modeling to solve real problems in applications with social impacts, particularly logistics problems related with relief operations, food security and healthcare delivery in developing countries


Conference : How can data science serve humanitarian aid?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 12h15 - 13h — Amphi orange

In Africa, annual weather patterns cause recurrent shocks that expose populations to severe food insecurity. Conflicts across the region, the population health and economic vulnerabilities generate crises and trigger the need for humanitarian assistance. In Canada, it is estimated that about one in eight household is food insecure. Hurricanes are a consistent burden on the islands of the Caribbean and have inflicted significant losses in the region. In April 2015, Nepal was hit by a 7.8 magnitude earthquake, which caused important damages. Many of the most affected communities were located in remote mountainous areas and were left out of access to secure water sources due to the destruction of the supply system. During this presentation, research projects related to logistics decision planning and preparedness network design for mitigating the consequences of such issues will be presented. All these projects are based on studies made in collaboration with humanitarian organizations across the world and use real data. The solution approaches were developed using techniques rooted in data science, such as mathematical programming, optimization, and statistical analysis. The aim is to present concrete examples to show of how data science can support humanitarian operations in different contexts.

Marie-Jean Meurs Marie-Jean Meurs
Professor of Computer Science

Marie-Jean Meurs is a Professor of Computer Science at the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). She holds a MSc in Applied Mathematics and a PhD in Computer Science with specialization in natural language understanding in dialogue systems. Her main field of expertise is Artificial Intelligence (AI), in particular machine learning for natural language processing. Vice-Chair of the Researcher Council of the Digital Research Alliance of Canada, Scientific Director of Calcul Québec, and founding member of the HumanIA research group, Dr. Meurs is a member of the Centre interuniversitaire de recherche sur la science et la technologie (CIRST). A specialist in sentiment analysis, especially as applied to health, Dr. Meurs is currently leading the RELAI team, investigating how a respectful and explainable AI can support struggling people and mental health practitioners.


Conference : Can AI systems be culturally sensitive?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 13h45 - 14h30 — Amphi rouge

Across all academic disciplines, one can observe an increased sensitivity towards gender equality, inclusion, intercultural competence, anti-racism and anti-discriminatory practices. In Artificial Intelligence (AI), this has been taken into account and discussed mainly as algorithmic biases, leading to unjust outcomes. Yet, although there is a great body of literature on ethics of AI, there is not much on culturally sensitive AI. This presentation will discuss why cultural diversity has to be taken into account from the very beginning of AI development. Focusing on applications of natural language processing to mental health risk detection, we will question if and how a one-size-fits-all model could be able to efficiently cater to the necessary transformation of health care utilizing AI. Since the impact of language structure and characteristics on mental health risk detection has been clearly shown, it is now mandatory to question the cultural sensitivity of models deriving their information from European or North-American cultures and trained on English corpora only.

Marie-Paule Jeansonne Marie-Paule Jeansonne
President and Chief Executive Officer

Marie-Paule holds a Master's in International Affairs, with a focus on international finance and economic policy, from Columbia University-SIPA, and a Bachelor of Laws from Université de Montréal. Marie-Paule took over the leadership of the Forum IA Québec after working on the adoption of research, science and innovation policies within the Quebec government. Previously, she was an engagement manager at McKinsey & Company and a commercial litigation lawyer at Davies Ward Phillips & Vineberg. Between 2016 and 2018, Marie-Paule took part in Québec’s first efforts to structure its rising AI ecosystem. Forum IA Quebec’s mission is to mobilize all of the AI ecosystem’s actors around a common goal : to maximize the economic and social benefits of AI.


Conference : Does Quebec have what it takes to maintain its leadership position in AI?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 16h - 16h45 — Amphi orange

For a small nation, Quebec is doing exceptionally well in AI right now. In fact, Tortoise ranked it 7th in its 2021 edition of the Global AI Index (Germany, France and Israel are among the countries Quebec is ahead of). This enviable positioning is the result of Quebec's strength in research, the quality of the government's AI support strategies implemented over the past five years, and the presence of dynamic and well-funded AI producers in the ecosystem. But the world of AI is changing at breakneck speed. Does Quebec have all the tools it needs to consolidate its current world ranking in AI? To make the transition to an ever more robust AI? To maximize the positive impacts of AI on our organizations and our society? To remain a reference in responsible AI?

Marie Sébire Marie Sébire
Photographer

When she entered elementary school, Marie's teacher asked her students to draw their future profession. Marie drew herself as a photographer. Later, she wanted to be a journalist. Finally, she became a project manager in associations, then at the French Embassy in Chile: it was more difficult to draw. In 2015, she settled in Montreal, trained in professional photography and launched herself. At 6 years old, she was quite inspired. Since then, Marie has been using her documentary eye for corporate mandates, and developing reporting projects alone or in partnership with other journalists. Fascinated by the power of her camera to open doors, she likes to enter the daily lives of her subjects.

Marili Clark Marili Clark
Photographer

At the age of twenty, she decided that her life would be dedicated to art and beauty. She is interested in all forms of art, be it drawing, painting or the performing arts as an actress and singer among other things. Before studying commercial photography at Dawson College, she first studied theater at the Université du Québec in Montréal. For her, portrait photography is first and foremost a special meeting with her client. In addition to her constant concern to make beautiful images, it is essential for her to create a climate of trust, because, for many people, it can be stressful to be photographed. She is here to highlight and bring out the best of people.

Marine Larrivaz Marine Larrivaz
PhD student in primatology

Marine Larrivaz is a second year doctoral student in primatology in the Department of Anthropology at Udem. Her research topics in primatology focus on primate hierarchy and sexuality. Her thesis concerns a group of colobus magistrate in Ghana. She is working on the problem of simultaneous investment in this species and its factors of appearance. Simultaneous investment is the fact that females can be pregnant and lactating at the same time. Marine is therefore interested in females that are able to avoid lactational amenorrhea. She uses two types of data in her thesis: behavioral data collected in the field that takes into account all the social interactions of a female individual and chemical data that uses stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes to complement the behavioral data and better assess the weaning of the pups. Marine Larrivaz obtained a bachelor's degree in biology from the Université Catholique de Lille, France and a master's degree in fundamental and comparative ethology from the Université Paris Sorbonne Nord, France. Marine Larrivaz is therefore a biologist, ethologist and primatologist.

Marion Cossin Marion Cossin
Engineer researcher

Marion Cossin is a research engineer at the Centre de recherche d'innovation et de transfert en Art du Cirque (CRITAC). She holds a Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from the Université de Montréal. D. in biomedical engineering from the University of Montreal and a master's degree in mechanical engineering from Polytechnique Montreal. Her research focuses on the interaction between circus equipment design and acrobatic performance.

Mat Chivers Mat Chivers
Artiste

British visual artist Mat Chivers was born in Bristol, UK in 1973 and studied sculpture at The Nottingham Trent University, UK and Escuela de Belles Arte, Barcelona, Spain from 1993-96. An extended period of travel followed, where he trained in sustainable farming and building practices in Europe, culminating in a solo journey overland to India where he spent time living in the Himalayas. He returned to the UK in 1999 and established a studio in the south west of England. He lives between Totnes, UK and Montréal, Canada. Through his work he looks at some of the relationships between human and more-than-human consciousness, ecology, evolutionary processes and ethics by bringing traditional analogue approaches to making into counterpoint with cutting edge technologies. Collaborations with researchers and organisations in the fields of science and technology are at the core of his practice in sculpture, drawing, film and performance. Key solo exhibitions include: Migrations at Arsenal Art Contemporain Montréal, Canada and Musée d’art de Joliette, Canada; Harmonic Distortion at PM/AM, London, UK and Altered States at Hallmark House, Johannesburg, South Africa.


Conference : Migrations: Where Have We Come From? Where Are We Going? & How Much Choice Do We Have?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 12h15 - 13h — Amphi rouge

In this presentation British artist Mat Chivers and Jean-François Belisle, director and chief curator at Musee d'Art de Joliette, Quebec will give an overview of Migrations - a sculptural project developed for the Musee d'Art de Joliette in collaboration with Element AI. 1,480 human hand imprints were digitally scanned and the 3D data was used to train an Artificial Intelligence built specifically for the project to understand what forms are created when we grasp a piece of clay. The AI then output its own imprint based on this learning, creating a file that was used to program a robot to cut the shape of the AI imagined hand imprint into stone. The resulting sculptural form is a composite object made from pieces of a type of stone known as impactite which was created when a meteorite struck Québec 350 million years ago. A conversation will follow that expands on some of the themes explored in the sculpture including the role of a haptic relationship with the world in human evolutionary process, the migration of consciousness across material boundaries and agency and authorship in the contemporary moment.

Mathias Delahaye Mathias Delahaye
PhD student in AI

Passionate about engineering, Mathias joined the École Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Douai in 2015 after completing a preparatory course in mathematics, physics and engineering sciences in Paris. During his engineering training, he specializes in the major "Information and Communication Systems Engineering (ISIC)" which will allow him to expand his knowledge in Computer Science, but also to discover the industrial world through several internships in structures of different sizes and types. Upon graduation, he did a short internship at the École Nationale Supérieure de Techniques Avancées Bretagne (ENSTA Bretagne), where he discovered FPGAs and their numerous fields of application before finally joining the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) as a PhD student in the Immersive Interaction research Group (IIG) directed by Dr. Ronan Boulic. His thesis aims at allowing a user to have and to appropriate a virtual body (avatar) in a virtual world when the proportions of this avatar are different from those of the user. An important part of this research is therefore to evaluate the human tolerance towards distortions (conflict) voluntarily introduced between what the person does (proprioception) and what the person sees (avatar). In parallel to the research, he will devote himself to teaching and will be a teaching assistant for the Information, Computation, Communication (ICC) course, will teach the practical part of the Virtual Reality (VR) course and will supervise several semester projects.


Conference : Does machine learning improve the user experience in virtual reality?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 13h45 - 14h30 — Amphi orange

In 1967 the first Head-Mounted Display (HMD) was developed by Ivan Sutherland during his Ph.D. at the MIT, allowing users to immerse themselves in a virtual environment (VE). If the device had to be attached to the ceiling and was only displaying wire-frame models, nowadays, completely standalone devices, such as the Oculus Quest, can be worn directly and everywhere. However, to allow users to interact with the VE through a virtual body leveraging their experience, the system needs to acquire user input. How can such data be captured? A common approach is to use tracking cameras: We can place markers on the user to animate its avatar and then refine the quality of the animation using neural networks. With even more data, more complex models, and RGB cameras, the use of trackers can be skipped! But, ML does not restrain itself for tracking capabilities: it can be used to adjust a game’s difficulty, to detect whenever a subject perceives an internal conflict between his observation and his expectation, and for many other purposes in order to enhance the user’s experience in embodied VR!

Maude Bonenfant Maude Bonenfant
Full Professor of Communication

Maude Bonenfant is a professor in the Department of Social and Public Communication at the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) and holds a PhD in semiotic studies. Her research focuses on the social dimensions of communication technologies, digital social networks, massive data, artificial intelligence, online communities and the study of games. She holds the Canada Research Chair in Massive Data and Gaming Communities, is co-director of the Laboratory for Research in Socionumeric Media and Gamification and director of the Homo Ludens research group on gaming and communication.


Table ronde : A.I., videogames, interdisciplinary research : key ingredients for rich & safe digital lives ?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 14h30

No-code or Low code is a technology trend allowing people to create software applications with accessible interfaces instead of having to write lines of code. In 1995, there were 31,000 web pages on the Internet. Today, there are tens of billions of pages. One of the main reasons has been the democratization of accessible tools that do not require technical skills to launch a website. Over the past 5 years, there has been a strong trend for video games to engage players as part of the gaming experience, either through user-generated content features or as as a social vector. During this time, the industry has learned how to make the most of deep learning or reinforcement learning to assist game creators or open up new gaming experiences. Over the past 5 years, most work on AI has focused on creating sophisticated algorithms based on existing datasets. These algorithms have reached a level of maturity that unlocks the possibility of creating new behaviors based solely on data engineering. Virtual worlds have been a playground of choice to develop and refine A.I. before applying it into the real world. Over the past 5 years, the academic community has become increasingly aware of the importance of interdisciplinary research, with landmark achievements such as the creation of OBVIA (International Observatory on the Societal Impacts of AI and digital) in 2019 or the grant AUDACE from FRQ which promotes interdisciplinary research in 2017. The video game industry is the perfect example of an interdisciplinary activity, because a video game is the alchemy of design, programming, art, social sciences, etc. What if AI & video games reinforced there bounds within a mature interdisciplinary ecosystem? What if state of the art in A.I. and the know-how of the video game industry offered more accessible content creation tools to populate rich open virtual worlds? What if this was the next evolution for AI and video games? Montreal, the province of Quebec and Canada have long relied on these disciplines. What if when and where he should be here, now?

Maxime Abolgassemi Maxime Abolgassemi
Professor and Writer

Maxime Abolgassemi teaches literature and general culture in preparatory classes at the lycée Chateaubriand in Rennes. He holds a doctorate in literature (University of Paris-Sorbonne) and an agrégé in modern literature, as well as a master's degree in theoretical physics (University Pierre-et-Marie-Curie). His work focuses on the "objective chance" of the Surrealists, the notion of counterfiction that he introduced, and democratic transparency (to which he is devoting a forthcoming book). In 2017, he published Nuit persane, a first novel that immerses the reader in Tehran in the last years before the Iranian Revolution.


Conference : What intelligence to understand the crowd?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 12h15 - 13h — Amphi mauve

The crowd, whether it is the people demonstrating or the spectators at a festival, is a fascinating subject of study. Stadiums without fans, deserted city squares: the Covid pandemic has revealed just how much it matters in our lives. Its mystery lies in its ambivalence, since it can suddenly become enthusiastic or panic-stricken, whether it is a pillar of democracy or a fanatical supporter of dictatorships. In the 19th century Gustave le Bon wondered about the "mental contagion" that operates; Sigmund Freud sees a regressive libido that he also applies to the army or the church; sociology and ethnology identify cultural traits. Another approach is pragmatic, and wonders, for example, how to anticipate accidents during the evacuation of a stadium. To the human sciences, which seek to understand the crowd or a particular crowd, have been added recent works in Artificial Intelligence which simulate (for example to generate credible images in cinema) or which analyze live crowd movements (with ethical issues on the possible control). I will rely on the innovative work carried out at INRIA in Rennes under the direction of Julien Pettré. To ask ourselves "what kind of intelligence to understand the crowd" is basically to measure the specificity of AI, and to try to understand its power and limits.

Maxime Colleret Maxime Colleret
Doctoral student in science, technology and society

Maxime Colleret is a doctoral student in the Science, Technology and Society program at UQAM and a student member of the Centre interuniversitaire de recherche sur la science et la technologie (CIRST). He has published several works on the development of academic institutions in Canada, particularly with respect to technology transfer. He also addresses the promises of nanotechnology and artificial intelligence in several articles and research notes.


Conference : Is artificial intelligence creating an economy of promise?
Friday 6 may 2022, 13h45 - 14h30 — Amphi bleu

In the early 2000s, most Western states agreed that nanotechnology would trigger a new industrial revolution, requiring a workforce of millions and leading to a near complete restructuring of national economic models. Twenty years later, we know that a considerable part of the promises on which these expectations were based were in fact greatly exaggerated. Nanotechnology is no longer the focus of technology policy. It is now AI that monopolizes the attention and promises yet another industrial revolution. Thanks to real breakthroughs in machine learning techniques, AI has become a national priority and its promoters are taking advantage of a real investment race to realize their industrial projects. In our presentation, we will compare the discourses of nanotechnology and AI promoters and show that the rhetoric of the promise deployed by them is the same. We will also analyze the response to these promises by the Quebec government.

Michaël Chassé Michaël Chassé
Critical care physician

Michaël Chassé is a critical care physician at the Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CHUM), senior scientist at the CHUM Research Centre and associate professor at the Department of Medicine and the School of Public Health of the Université de Montréal. He holds a PhD in epidemiology from the University of Ottawa. Dr. Chassé is the Scientific Director of the Centre for Integration and Analysis of Medical Data (CITADEL) at CHUM. CITADEL brings together a group of scientists and professionals specialized in health sciences, biostatistics, bioinformatics and machine learning. He is also the Assistant Scientific Director of Data Science at the CHUM Research Centre. His research focuses on improving traditional epidemiological research methods using new technologies such as machine learning and innovative clinical trials, particularly in critical care areas such as organ donation, organ transplantation and blood transfusions. He is a member of the IVADO-funded "Human Health and Secondary Use of Data" research team.


Conference : What are the challenges of integrating AI in healthcare?
Friday 6 may 2022, 11h30 - 12h15 — Amphi rouge

In progress


Table ronde : What is missing in AI today?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 13h45

The field of artificial intelligence has gone through some tough times, most notably known as "AI winters." But over the past decade, we have seen a dramatic rebound, thanks to new capabilities combined with scientific and technological advances. AI is now seen as an enabling technology, with the potential to make an impact in many, many areas. It is often compared to the technologies that fueled the industrial revolutions. Although more and more concrete applications of AI exist, research in the field is far from over. In what areas has AI not yet been exploited to its full potential? At a more fundamental level, what are the limits of current approaches? What are the promising avenues of research and what are the obstacles that seem insurmountable? In short, what is missing in AI today?

Michel Leblanc Michel Leblanc
President and Chief Executive Officer

Michel Leblanc is President and Chief Executive Officer of the Board of Trade of Metropolitan Montreal, the largest private organization in Quebec dedicated to economic development. As such, he is the official spokesperson for the organization, and is responsible for planning, management and coordination, as well as monitoring all operations. With a wealth of experience in both the private and public sectors, Michel Leblanc has a solid understanding of metropolitan issues. An economist by training, he has a keen understanding of economic issues as well as the reality of business people and the challenges they face. A recognized expert in economic strategy and development, Michel Leblanc was a managing partner at SECOR. He has previously held senior management positions, notably at Génome Québec, Montréal International and the Institute for Research on Public Policy. Michel Leblanc obtained a Bachelor's degree in Economics in 1987 and a Master's degree in Economics in 1992 from the Université de Montréal. He was named Honorary Graduate of the Year in 2009 by the Department of Economics of the Université de Montréal. In October 2012, he was honored by the Association des diplômés de l'Université de Montréal for his professional achievements.Michel Leblanc chairs the advisory committee for the economic development of the territory, created by Mayor Valérie Plante. He also chairs the board of directors of the MONTREAL HIGH LIGHTS Festival. In addition, he sits on the boards of the Board of Trade of Metropolitan Montreal Foundation, SCALE.AI (Supply Chains And Logistics Excellence AI) and the Association of Chamber of Commerce Executives (ACCE). He is also a member of the Conseil emploi métropole, the Steering Committee on the Mobility of People and Goods in the Greater Montreal Area (Mobilité Montréal) and the Montréal, Cultural Metropolis steering committee. He is also an ambassador for Innovation Square (IQ).


Conference : Are we on the cusp of AI integration across the economy?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 9h15 - 10h — Amphi mauve

In progress

Michel Viso Michel Viso
Exobiologist

Michel Viso was a veterinarian for many years. He enrolled in Alfort Veterinary School in 1980 and the National Institute of Agronomical Research in 1981. He was chosen to be an astronaut by the French space agency, CNES, in 1985. He collaborated on the RHESUS Project in cooperation with NASA. His prospects of traveling to space evaporated in 1993 when NASA ended the project. He then went on to ensure scientific responsibility in animal physiological and biological space experiments performed in cooperation with the United States, Russia, and other partners. In 2004, CNES named him to the position of scientific manager for Exobiology, in preparation for French participation in the European project Exomars and future exploration missions in the solar system, including new projects on sample returns from Mars in the 2030s. He represents the CNES on COSPAR’s Panel for Planetary Protection. In June 2021, Michel Viso becomes Innovaxiom's scientific advisor.


Table ronde : Could AI make decisions instead of the control centers or the astronaut?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 10h45

Astronauts must place total trust in the programming of their flights, which includes numerous self-checking procedures to correct itself, and warning devices to request human intervention. We are now witnessing fully automated flights with passenger-tourists with no specific skills. Human intervention is still possible, but only to a certain extent, in case of unforeseen events, and human intelligence remains assisted by AI. Astronauts are trained to eventually take full programmatic control in case of a major accident, such as a fire, depressurization, breakdown, or the impact of space waste. This has already happened. Would they blindly trust an artificial intelligence?


Table ronde : How can AI applications improve the life of Quebecers and Canadians?
Friday 6 may 2022, 16h

From smartphones and chatbots to predicting how protein molecules fold, AI is a technology that is already transforming many aspects of our lives. It has already been integrated in a number of applications and we expect it to be even more present in the coming years. How will these applications change our lives? Which areas in our society will benefit most from this? Will we see improvements in the life of all Canadians or will the benefit be limited to a subset?


Table ronde : How can we use AI as a catalyst for innovation in the energy transition?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 15h15

Today, the topic of artificial intelligence is part and parcel of discussions in many sectors of society and the economy: image and speech recognition, machine translation, image generation, etc. This is in large part thanks to impressive advances in the last decade of machine learning and in particular deep learning applications. With the growing electrification of the energy mix and the diversification of generation sources— intermittent, variable and distributed—we are just scratching the surface of the potential for AI to accelerate the transition to ultra-efficient, low-emission and interconnected energy systems. New AI opportunities are fascinating and innovative, but they also raise many questions. Is artificial intelligence the best solution to accelerate the energetic transition? How do we consider the challenges of implementing an AI solution, such as robustness, bias and explainability, in order to avoid the potential lack of trust that is difficult to offset a posteriori? How do we set up a certification process for AI solutions to allow them to be used in highly regulated environments? How do we optimize the energy and resources used by AI itself, for learning and data storage, as we strive to meet climate change challenges?


Table ronde : What is missing in AI today?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 13h45

The field of artificial intelligence has gone through some tough times, most notably known as "AI winters." But over the past decade, we have seen a dramatic rebound, thanks to new capabilities combined with scientific and technological advances. AI is now seen as an enabling technology, with the potential to make an impact in many, many areas. It is often compared to the technologies that fueled the industrial revolutions. Although more and more concrete applications of AI exist, research in the field is far from over. In what areas has AI not yet been exploited to its full potential? At a more fundamental level, what are the limits of current approaches? What are the promising avenues of research and what are the obstacles that seem insurmountable? In short, what is missing in AI today?


Signing : Kididoc de l’Espace
Thursday 5 may 2022, 12h15 - 13h

Miguel Aubouy Miguel Aubouy
Expert in innovation

Miguel Aubouy, Phd, defines himself as an intellectual arms dealer. He has spent his life experimenting with innovation in all its forms (scientific discovery, technological innovation, artistic creation, entrepreneurship), understanding the power relations that occur in disruptive projects, analyzing the struggles of innovators, and deconstructing their tricks, feints, and reflexes. He has drawn lessons and weapons from them. He puts this arsenal at the service of startups that want to grow or organizations that want to survive.


Conference : Can innovation be a science?
Friday 6 may 2022, 10h45 - 11h30 — Amphi orange

Until now, innovation was an instrument at the service of a science. It was not a science in its own right. One teaches innovation for business or innovation for engineering, for example. One never teaches innovation independently of the particular field in which one seeks to apply it. In this lecture, I propose a paradigm shift: innovation becomes a science in its own right, with technology, business, natural sciences or art as possible applications, without this list being limiting. Then, we will see a new question emerge, whose implications are dizzying: which science exactly?

Misha Benjamin Misha Benjamin
General Counsel

Misha Benjamin is the incoming General Counsel at Sama, overseeing all legal aspects of their software and services for annotating training and production data for AI. Prior to that, he was Associate General Counsel at McKinsey & Company, where he helped develop risk guardrails and oversaw contractual discussions for advanced analytics and AI engagements. In particular, he helped structure their risk approach to high-risk AI engagements and informed how new AI regulations would shape their business and those of their clients. He first developed his AI expertise at Element AI, where he was responsible for shepherding AI software from research to commercial deployment, formed the company’s position on issues such as the reuse of trained models and monitored and pushed for regulatory oversight of AI. He also pushed for more legal clarity on rights related to training data for AI, resulting in the creation of the Montreal Data License Framework.


Conference : Are lawyers and regulators too focused on AI models?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30 — Amphi mauve

The pace of regulation and legal commentary on AI has been accelerating non-stop for the last few years, but the bulk of that attention has focused on the front end of the value chain - namely models and outputs. We will discuss areas that are still overlooked, the consequences this could have and what practitioners can do to fill those gaps. For instance, the fact that open source licenses don’t properly address important issues when making data (or data labels) available to the public, that data prep/engineering is overlooked in AI contracting and that regulatory oversight has largely failed to focus on the key phases of the AI pipeline.

Myriam Prasow-Émond Myriam Prasow-Émond
M.Sc. student in astrophysics

Myriam Prasow-Émond is in the process of obtaining a master's degree in physics with a specialization in astrophysics at the Université de Montréal, under the supervision of Julie Hlavacek-Larrondo. She is currently working on a project to search for exoplanets in extreme environments, such as those surrounding black holes, using the Keck Telescope in Hawai'i. During her bachelor's degree in physics, she also had the opportunity to work on galaxy clusters with the Chandra and Hubble telescopes. Passionate about popularization and pedagogy, she frequently shares her knowledge, through conferences, with the general public and the most curious people. In addition, she is very involved in her academic community and is also a tutor, teaching assistant and financial officer for her union. As of September 2022, Myriam is pursuing a PhD in Earth Sciences at Imperial College London. Her project will focus on combining machine learning and satellite data to help small island developing states combat climate change.

Nathalie Bier Nathalie Bier
Occupational therapy researcher

Nathalie Bier is an occupational therapist, full professor at the School of Rehabilitation of the Université de Montréal, researcher and associate director of innovation and research development at the Research Centre of the Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal (CIUSSS Centre-sud-de-l'île-de-Montréal). The main objective of her research work is to promote home care for elderly people with cognitive problems, such as those encountered in Alzheimer's disease. His research program aims to develop interventions based on new technologies and community mobilization. Its work is carried out through collaborative research approaches, such as action research and living laboratories.


Conference : Can AI contribute to the maintenance of the elderly in loss of autonomy at home?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 9h15 - 10h — Amphi rouge

The COVID 19 pandemic has highlighted the importance, and many benefits, of aging in the setting of one's choice. Could artificial intelligence (AI) be a tool to coordinate and support services for older adults who are losing their independence and wish to remain in their homes and communities? For many years, researchers have been using AI in the context of smart environments to recognize the activities of daily living performed by an older person in their home. AI is also used in this context to detect deviations from the usual routine and thus behaviors that inform us about the onset, or possible worsening, of a health condition - such as Alzheimer's disease. It could even, in the near future, predict functional decline. Finally, AI is being used to develop and offer assistance to the elderly directly in their homes, at the moment of need. For example, could AI help home support workers better understand the service needs of seniors? Could seniors use their data to choose the services they want to receive? The conference aims at answering these questions by presenting the advances in the field, the perspectives of this use of AI in home care in Quebec and some ethical issues to consider in order to implement such a service in a respectful way for the elderly.

Nathalie de Marcellis-Warin Nathalie de Marcellis-Warin
President and Chief Executive Officer

Nathalie de Marcellis-Warin, PhD is President and Chief Executive Officer at CIRANO and Full Professor at Polytechnique Montreal. Nathalie de Marcellis-Warin holds a PhD in Management Science from the ENS Cachan (France). She is a full professor at Polytechnique Montréal and President and CEO of the Centre interuniversitaire de recherche en analyse des organisations (CIRANO). She is co-PI for Monitoring and surveys function at the International Observatory on the societal impacts of AI and digital technology (OBVIA), and a member of the Commission de l'éthique en science et en technologie du Québec. Her research interests focus on risk management and decision making in different contexts of risk and uncertainty as well as the public policies put in place. She participated in the development of the Montreal Declaration for the Responsible Development of AI.


Conference : Conference: What strategies to enhance the AI skills of workers?
Friday 6 may 2022, 14h30 - 15h15 — Amphi bleu

The need for talent in the field of digital intelligence and artificial intelligence (AI) is growing in all sectors of activity in Quebec. In a context of labour shortage, the need for new skills cannot be met solely by recruiting new resources. Organizations will also have to rely on their internal resources and train them. The presentation will synthesize the highlights that emerge from a literature review, and interviews and exchanges with a community of AI explorers in management. The first condition for success is to ensure that there is a good understanding of what AI is. For decision-makers and managers, it is a matter of ensuring that they also have a good knowledge of the opportunities that AI offers, the issues it raises and the associated skill needs. The need to offer training better adapted to employed workers and to recognize the skills developed on the job through experience and self-training is another condition for success.

Nicholas Ayache Nicholas Ayache
Research director

Nicholas Ayache is a research director at Inria, where he leads the EPIONE research team, dedicated to the digital patient and digital medicine. He is also scientific director of the 3IA Côte d'Azur Interdisciplinary Institute of Artificial Intelligence based in Nice Sophia-Antipolis. His current research focuses on the introduction of artificial intelligence algorithms to guide the diagnosis, prognosis and therapy of patients based on their medical images and all available data. Nicholas Ayache has been a member of the Academy of Sciences since 2014 and an open member of the National Academy of Surgery since 2017. In 2013-2014 he was a visiting professor at the Collège de France where he introduced a new course on the "personalized digital patient". In 2007 he was a visiting scholar at MIT and Harvard (Boston). He is a member of several strategic boards in France and abroad, and co-founder of 7 companies. Nicholas Ayache has received prestigious awards, including the International Steven Hoogendijk Award (2020), the Grand Prix de la Ville de Nice (2019), the Grand Prix Inria-Académie des sciences (2014), the Microsoft Grand Prize for Research in Europe (2008, Royal Society and Academy of Sciences), and the EADS Foundation Information Sciences Award (2006).


Conference : AI and medical imaging: can digital medicine replace doctors?
Friday 6 may 2022, 15h15 - 16h — Amphi bleu

Artificial intelligence can already interpret certain medical images with a precision comparable to that of medical specialists. It can be used to build a digital twin of the patient based on his or her medical images and additional available information (clinical, biological, behavioral, environmental, etc.). This digital twin can be used to guide the diagnosis, then to simulate, optimize and guide the therapy. Mathematical and biophysical models of the anatomy and physiology of living organisms remain essential to compel these digital medicine algorithms to provide reliable and interpretable results. Will digital medicine soon replace human medicine?


Signing : Des images médicales au patient numérique
Friday 6 may 2022, 16h - 16h45
Signing : Nouvelle enquête sur l'intelligence artificielle
Friday 6 may 2022, 16h - 16h45

Nicolas Deschamps Nicolas Deschamps
CEO

Nicolas Deschamps is the son and brother of farmers. He has a degree in mechanical design, is an experienced drone pilot and is passionate about innovative technologies such as drones and robotics. He is the initiator of the Drone Des Champs project, a company he created in Canada when he arrived as a French immigrant. Nicolas is the indispensable link between farmers and the Drone Des Champs team. His expertise and experience allow the company to take on projects with adapted solutionsto the challenges that farmers, agronomists and environmental experts face in reality.


Table ronde : How will AI and digital technologies contribute to making agriculture more sustainable?
Friday 6 may 2022, 9h15

Will artificial intelligence improve the performance of agriculture? How accurately can we predict environmental impacts, track organisms, or prevent disease? Robots, data sensors, and other diagnostic tools are providing more and more data to agricultural producers, but is it useful and valued? Would there be benefits to sharing data in the agricultural sector?

Nicole De Brabandere Nicole De Brabandere
Researcher in Art

Nicole De Brabandere (PhD, University of Arts, Linz) is an associate researcher at McGill University, Canada, and collaborator member at Hexagram. She is the editor of the forthcoming volume: Media, Practice and Theory: tracking emergent thresholds of experience, a collection of 10 chapters around concepts and practices of corporeality, articulation, and media, to be published by Vernon Press in spring, 2022. De Brabandere’s PhD thesis was awarded the “Research Excellence Award” by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Education, Science and Research, an award which is given to the forty top doctoral dissertations in all of Austria, from all disciplines. De Brabandere has published numerous peer-reviewed articles on topics such as affect, creative practice, collaboration and media studies, and has presented talks, workshops and exhibitions in these topics at public and private venues internationally. In 2021 De Brabandere presented the short paper “Machine-Generated Portraits as Impersonal Gestures” for the International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA): Why Sentience? in 2021. The findings presented in this talk will be published in the experimental text “Co-composing the Perceptible across Affective, Painterly and Computational Generativities” for the special issue: Algo-rhythms, Kunstlicht Journal, Amsterdam, spring 2022.


Conference : Does painting machine-generated images open a spacetime of corporeal co-composition between humans and machines?
Friday 6 may 2022, 16h - 16h45 — Amphi orange

This talk presents findings detailing the emergent perceptibility of images created by the Generative Adversarial Network (GAN) of the website ThisPersonDoesNotExist.com. The machine-generated images sometimes achieve the photographic likeness of a person, but also make visible computational patterns that propose alternate organizations of form and ground, surface and substance, materiality and immateriality. What’s more, images that initially appear to be objects signifying the real, upon close examination, have no single referential origin but are rather organized in strange configurations that traverse the photographic and computational. Through the careful study afforded by the process of painting these images, the appearance of referential figuration belies alternate generativities, where, for example, the appearance of depth-of-field or over-exposure is revealed as the substance of hair or cloth. While GAN renderings are generated in milliseconds, painting them offers an expanded temporality with which to engage their heterogeneous and transversal constitution. This in turn reconfigures the sense of facticity (and corresponding affects pitting subjects against objects) conjured by the photographic instant. The findings presented in this talk thus signal openings to engage and develop a felt sense of co-composition with the machine-generated image that traverses the human and machine.

Odile Noël Odile Noël
Product owner

Odile is a product owner for the artificial intelligence and data engineering team at Hilo. In this role, she is responsible for guiding the development of AI capabilities to increase energy efficiency and power shedding for Hilo's customers. Odile previously worked in energy optimization in the industrial gas sector, where she was exposed to industrial issues related to the various constraints in the Alberta and Ontario energy markets. She holds a Bachelor of Laws and a Bachelor of Chemical Engineering from the University of Montreal.


Table ronde : How can we use AI as a catalyst for innovation in the energy transition?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 15h15

Today, the topic of artificial intelligence is part and parcel of discussions in many sectors of society and the economy: image and speech recognition, machine translation, image generation, etc. This is in large part thanks to impressive advances in the last decade of machine learning and in particular deep learning applications. With the growing electrification of the energy mix and the diversification of generation sources— intermittent, variable and distributed—we are just scratching the surface of the potential for AI to accelerate the transition to ultra-efficient, low-emission and interconnected energy systems. New AI opportunities are fascinating and innovative, but they also raise many questions. Is artificial intelligence the best solution to accelerate the energetic transition? How do we consider the challenges of implementing an AI solution, such as robustness, bias and explainability, in order to avoid the potential lack of trust that is difficult to offset a posteriori? How do we set up a certification process for AI solutions to allow them to be used in highly regulated environments? How do we optimize the energy and resources used by AI itself, for learning and data storage, as we strive to meet climate change challenges?

Olivier Blais Olivier Blais
Co-founder

Olivier is co-founder and VP of decision science at Moov AI. He is the editor of the international ISO standard that defines the quality of artificial intelligence systems where he leads a team of 50 AI professionals worldwide. His cutting-edge knowledge in AI and machine learning has led him to lead the implementation of a data-driven culture in various industries and to support digital transformation projects in many companies such as Pratt & Whitney, Metro, Sharethrough and Premier Tech. He is an AI mentor for Creative Destruction Labs and coaches several start-ups. Olivier is the winner of the prestigious "30 under 30" award (Infopresse - 2019) and is co-author of a patent for an advanced algorithm that evaluates the creditworthiness of a borrower.


Conference : AI: to be or not to be?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 10h - 10h45 — Amphi mauve

The documentary series IA: To be or not to be questions the limits of the human being, in an era where machines are becoming more and more intelligent. Canadian science journalist Matthieu Dugal sets out to create his digital double by drawing on his personal data and using existing technologies, including Artificial Intelligence. Vali Fugulin, director of the series and creative director of the double, tells the story of the development of this virtual replica, which confronts the journalist with his own limits. What meaning can we give to life if machines can replace humans? Each advance in AI raises new ethical and existential questions; the field of artistic creation is no exception. Produced by Magasin Général for Radio-Canada, IA : être ou ne pas être will be launched in the summer of 2022. Creation of the double : MOOV.AI / Ganesh Baron Aloir.


Table ronde : How can we use AI as a catalyst for innovation in the energy transition?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 15h15

Today, the topic of artificial intelligence is part and parcel of discussions in many sectors of society and the economy: image and speech recognition, machine translation, image generation, etc. This is in large part thanks to impressive advances in the last decade of machine learning and in particular deep learning applications. With the growing electrification of the energy mix and the diversification of generation sources— intermittent, variable and distributed—we are just scratching the surface of the potential for AI to accelerate the transition to ultra-efficient, low-emission and interconnected energy systems. New AI opportunities are fascinating and innovative, but they also raise many questions. Is artificial intelligence the best solution to accelerate the energetic transition? How do we consider the challenges of implementing an AI solution, such as robustness, bias and explainability, in order to avoid the potential lack of trust that is difficult to offset a posteriori? How do we set up a certification process for AI solutions to allow them to be used in highly regulated environments? How do we optimize the energy and resources used by AI itself, for learning and data storage, as we strive to meet climate change challenges?

Olivier Perrin Olivier Perrin
CEO

Olivier Perrin, Franco-Canadian, has 19 years of professional experience, including 15 years in the world of entrepreneurship and international development support for public institutions and private organizations. The accompaniment of the implementation of the representation of the Grand-Est region (France) in Canada is an emblematic example. He is a founding director of Alsago (Becoming Elsewhere) which has integrated since 2008 on the European or North American market innovative international companies in the fields of IT governance, aerospace, open innovation, defense, human factors, artificial intelligence, cybersecurity, legaltech/regtech or blockchain. Olivier Perrin has progressively become a recognized partner of the cybersecurity or digital identity skills and funding ecosystem in Canada/Quebec.  He launched and animated the first APM Club (Association for the Progress of Management, a European network of more than 7,000 executives) in North America, which brings together Quebec executives every month with philosophers, inspirers, economists, and emblematic leaders to learn from differences and take a step back to lead differently. Olivier Perrin was also the Canadian launch-operator of the France/Canada Audiovisual Business Missions with Unterval, developing dozens of partnership or co-production projects for audiovisual works. Finally, he founded the CQTNC (Consortium Québécois en Transformation Numérique et Cybersécurité) which brings together 7 public/private partners from France and Canada.


Conference : How to generate a sustainable francophone digital trust ecosystem?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30 — Amphi orange

With the advent of the interconnected digital world, new virtual territories have emerged. They contain treasures and in particular all the data that the actors consciously or not deposit there. All this information gives each actor his digital identity. Some companies provide the services necessary for the functioning of this virtual world. Some have become hegemonic and, in fact, control the technologies used and their evolution. Becoming Elsewhere Entrepreneurs" helps organizations to build real bulwarks to protect themselves from malicious entities, to protect their digital identity and, as far as possible, to emancipate themselves from the technological tutelage of the large service providers. Of course, many questions underlie these actions: what are the limits of digital sovereignty and what ethical approach can be adopted? Should local entities be privileged and are they "trusted"? Can large international groups be "trusted" actors locally? Will the solutions chosen be able to find their place in the ecosystem of the future? Is there only a binary alternative, for or against, to the globalization of data? Globalization or sovereignty? The question-challenge is to demonstrate the urgency of protecting these digital territories now while building "trusted" international alternatives to the hegemony of the very large players in the sector.

Omar Zeitoun Omar Zeitoun
Lead for the software development team

Omar Zeitoun is the lead for the software development team at EVLO Energy Storage, where he specializes in data analysis, visualization and monitoring. He has a master’s degree in software engineering from McMaster University.


Table ronde : How can we use AI as a catalyst for innovation in the energy transition?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 15h15

Today, the topic of artificial intelligence is part and parcel of discussions in many sectors of society and the economy: image and speech recognition, machine translation, image generation, etc. This is in large part thanks to impressive advances in the last decade of machine learning and in particular deep learning applications. With the growing electrification of the energy mix and the diversification of generation sources— intermittent, variable and distributed—we are just scratching the surface of the potential for AI to accelerate the transition to ultra-efficient, low-emission and interconnected energy systems. New AI opportunities are fascinating and innovative, but they also raise many questions. Is artificial intelligence the best solution to accelerate the energetic transition? How do we consider the challenges of implementing an AI solution, such as robustness, bias and explainability, in order to avoid the potential lack of trust that is difficult to offset a posteriori? How do we set up a certification process for AI solutions to allow them to be used in highly regulated environments? How do we optimize the energy and resources used by AI itself, for learning and data storage, as we strive to meet climate change challenges?

Oury Monchi Oury Monchi
Scientific Director

D. in Computational Neuroscience from King's College London, UK. He then pursued postdoctoral fellowships at the Montreal Neurological Institute and the Research Center of the University Institute of Geriatrics of Montreal (CRIUGM) in neuroimaging applied to Parkinson's disease. Until the summer of 2014, he was an associate professor of radiology at the Université de Montréal and a regular researcher at the CRIUGM. From 2014 to 2021, Dr. Monchi was Professor and Director of Clinical Research in the Department of Clinical Neuroscience at the University of Calgary. During this time, he held the Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in Non-Motor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease and the Tourmaline Chair in Parkinson's Disease. Since 2018, he has been the Director of the Canadian-Open Parkinson Network, a platform funded by Brain-Canada and Parkinson Canada. Since November 2021, Prof. Monchi is the Scientific Director of the Research Center of the Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal and Full Professor in the Department of Radiology, Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine at the University of Montreal.


Conference : Does AI significantly improve MRI neuroimaging?
Friday 6 may 2022, 15h15 - 16h — Amphi orange

AI is increasingly used in conjunction with anatomical and functional MRI to understand brain function and disease. It is used both to optimize acquisition methods and in data analysis. In particular, this combination allows to improve the diagnosis and the prediction of the evolution of neurological diseases. We will give some examples and describe how AI applied to functional MRI allows to model the encoding (the prediction of regional neuronal activity) and decoding (the inference of the received stimuli) of the brain. We will conclude with a discussion of the current limitations of AI's contribution to MRI and its potential role in the clinic.

Pablo Valdes-Donoso Pablo Valdes-Donoso
Assistant Professor in AI for Veterinary Sciences

Pablo Valdes-Donoso is an assistant professor of AI for veterinary sciences at the Faculté de Médecine Vétérinaire de l'Université de Montréal. He has years of experience working across different food production systems. He holds a DVM degree from the Universidad de Chile, a master's in Preventive Veterinary Medicine, a master's in Applied Economics, and a Ph.D. in Epidemiology from the University of California, Davis. His research focuses on understanding how economic incentives of production can affect animal, human, and environmental health. He routinely uses statistical tools, including machine learning, time series, network analysis, system dynamics, and regression models, to analyze health-related issues. He has participated in national and international conferences, led quantitative workshops, taught university courses, collaborated with researchers from various countries, and written several peer-reviewed publications and outreach articles.


Conference : How can Artificial Intelligence improve animal, human, and environmental health?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 10h - 10h45 — Amphi orange

In veterinary sciences, a field that goes from animal health to food production and public health, AI emerging developments move forward in several areas. Research on AI in veterinary medicine that targets companion animals has been initially focused on image interpretation and disease diagnosis. The use of sensors and real-time data promising improvements in production efficiency coupled with increased animal health and welfare status are at the heart of current research on precision livestock farming. Enhancing food safety and reducing environmental impact through exhaustive control of inputs in animal production may also justify the adoption of these new technologies. Another branch of current veterinary research is the development of complex models that use data from various sources to alert authorities about the emergence animal infectious diseases and increased risks of zoonotic disease from wildlife populations. In this talk, I discuss the recent research and development of AI on animal health, its applications towards a multidimensional discipline (i.e., One Health), as well as its limitations and future challenges.

Pascale Elbaz Pascale Elbaz
Researcher in Chinese language and civilization

Pascale Elbaz holds a doctorate in Chinese language and civilization from Inalco and is a teacher-researcher at ISIT, Grande école de l'interculturel et du multilinguisme (Paris-Panthéon-Assas-Université). She is responsible for the school's transdisciplinary intercultural seminar. She is also an associate researcher at IFRAE (French Institute for Research on East Asia). Her research focuses on two areas: the analysis of Chinese vocabulary of aesthetics and culture, and the pedagogy of translation and terminology in the era of multilingualism and automatic natural language processing (CAT, MT). She also works as a Chinese-French translator in publishing: Le Chant de la Terre chinoise (2021), Photographies de la Chine d'aujourd'hui (2020) (Ed. Horizon orientale). She is a member of the Research Task Force of FIT (International Federation of Translators) and participates in the writing of articles on the transformation of the translation profession and on the training of the new generation of translators.


Conference : Will neural machine translation replace humans?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 10h45 - 11h30 — Amphi rouge

In recent years, the progress of neural machine translation has been meteoric. For the most widely spoken languages, translation engines can obtain a "raw" (gisting) result that is sufficient for certain uses (knowing the general idea of a text, translating a user manual, etc.). However, the results are insufficient for specialized texts (medicine, sciences, SHS) or texts with a high cultural content. This shortcoming is also true for language combinations where textual data is not sufficient. Neural machine translation needs a large amount of data to work efficiently, in this case pairs of source texts (in the original language) and target texts (in the language into which the text is translated). However, in the Chinese-French combination, for example, this data is (still) rare. To overcome this difficulty, the engines use a pivotal language: English. But this poses real problems of meaning... How can we position ourselves in relation to these new AI-fueled tools, how can we recognize their flaws and know how to remedy them? How can we train the new generation of translators to use the tool while preserving their freedom of judgment and strengthening their linguistic sensitivity and cultural discernment?

Pascale Lehoux Pascale Lehoux
Researcher in public health

Pascale Lehoux holds a Bachelor's degree in Industrial Design, a PhD in Public Health and completed her postdoctoral training in Science & Technology Dynamics at the University of Amsterdam. She is a full professor in the Department of Management, Evaluation and Health Policy and a researcher at the Centre de recherche en santé publique (CReSP) of the Université de Montréal. She is a member of the Board of Directors of the Institut national d'excellence en santé et services sociaux (INESSS) and co-leader of the "Research and Creation" function of the Observatoire international des impacts sociétaux de l'intelligence artificielle et du numérique (OBVIA). Over the past twenty years, she has developed numerous knowledge mobilization initiatives, including the Hinnovic blog, and published more than 150 scientific articles. Her work has clarified the impact of business models and venture capital on health innovation and strengthened methods for prospective public deliberation. His current research program, In Fieri, examines the design, financing and commercialization of responsible health innovation (RHI). Funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the team includes experts in health services and policy research, medicine, engineering, design, ethics, sociology and economics.


Conference : Is AI responsible or not?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 15h15 - 16h — Amphi mauve

Based on the premise that some words cannot be used lightly, this presentation aims to provoke new - and also playful - reflections on what the qualifier "responsible" means when attached to Artificial Intelligence. Using the healthcare field as a case study, where responsibility has been institutionalized over several decades, I will use real and fictional examples to clarify what thinking about and building responsible solutions entails. I will point out that the AI and digital industry differs in many ways from the medical device and pharmaceutical industries, and that its current characteristics move us away from an ability to truly embody responsibility. Considering the societal challenges we all face, it is high time to rethink the innovations that the 21st century needs.

Patricia Conrod Patricia Conrod
clinical psychologist

Patricia Conrod is a clinical psychologist and professor of Psychiatry and Addiction at Universite de Montreal, with over 20 years of experience conducting research on populations at risk of addiction. Her research has identified a number of psychological and biologic risk factors for addiction and has helped to delineate the motivational mechanisms that explain how risk translates to heavy or problematic substance misuse among vulnerable groups. Moreover, this research has led to the development of novel interventions that match the motivational basis of risk, supporting new, more personalized and targeted strategies for addiction treatment and prevention. This new approach involves intervening at the personality and neurocognitive level rather than at the symptom level and has proven remarkably effective at, not only reducing and preventing substance misuse, but also at reducing mental health problems such as anxiety, depression, suicidal ideation and conduct problems. Dr. Conrod has developed screening scales and intervention material that have been translated and tested in numerous languages and contexts around the world. She helped to design the IMAGEN study and led the phenotyping workpackage for the IMAGEN Consortium, and with Dr. Hugh Garavan (UVM), she established the ENIGMA Addiction working group which aims to apply the ENIGMA approach towards data pooling across addiction neuroimaging studies. She Co-directs the FRQS Research Network on Suicide, Mood Disorders and Related Conditions (RQSHA), the Canadian Cannabis and Psychosis Research Team (CCPRT), and the Universite de Montreal Initiative on Brain and Mental Health.


Conference : Will AI as a preventive medicine tool be accepted and used?
Friday 6 may 2022, 13h45 - 14h30 — Amphi mauve

Thirty years of longitudinal cohort studies have shown that psychiatric conditions can be predicted with some level of accuracy. Childhood genetic, psychological and neurological markers of risk in interaction with environmental conditions can not only predict who is at risk, but what kinds of mental health and substance use problems an individual is likely to experience during adulthood. Machine learning models are further refining prediction tools and novel intervention strategies have been developed and tested targeting different risk pathways. Such targeted approaches have proven to be highly effective with lasting effects on adult mental health outcomes. However, is society ready to apply what we know about risk for mental health in order to prevent it? This talk will address challenges associated with AI-informed targeted prevention and the social, ethical and practical issues that can mitigate these concerns in order to render preventive mental health more acceptable and impactful.

Patricia Gautrin Patricia Gautrin
PhD student in AI ethics

Patricia Gautrin is a PhD student in AI ethics at the University of Montreal, under the supervision of Professor Marc-Antoine Dilhac. She is a research assistant at the Algora Lab of MILA. The Algora Lab is an interdisciplinary academic laboratory that develops a deliberative ethics of AI and digital innovation and analyzes the societal and political aspects of the emerging algorithmic society. Patricia is also an AI ethics journalist for CScience AI. CScience IA is the media 100% dedicated to Artificial Intelligence in Quebec. As president of Intelligence NAPSE, she seeks to develop a new international ethical framework for AI aligned with the United Nations' SDG16.


Table ronde : Will AI invent the jobs of tomorrow?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 9h15

The current trend in university and vocational training programs is to expand disciplines and adjust student quotas according to employment forecasts. This pragmatism is certainly legitimate from the point of view of the needs of the economy and the supply of jobs for new entrants to the labour market. However, is it prudent in relation to the importance of fundamental research in the development of knowledge and its applications in societies that are evolving more and more rapidly? Can AI anticipate the upheavals in social behaviors that are constantly changing demand? Can it predict the emergence of new jobs and the disappearance of others? Can it invent a future? Can it make it inevitable?

Patrick Jeandroz Patrick Jeandroz
Chief of Data Science and High Performance Computing Expertise

Patrick Jeandroz has a bachelor's degree in mathematics and computer science and a master's degree in operations research. He has been working for Hydro-Québec since 2002 as an optimization consultant and then as Chief Mathematical Modeling Expertise for the Generator. Since 2018, he has been Chief of Data Science and High Performance Computing Expertise at Hydro-Québec's Research Center. His team consists of 25 researchers in Artificial Intelligence, Cybersecurity, Operations Research and High Performance Computing. Many of their research projects are in partnership with academia and they are IVADO and MILA members.


Table ronde : How can we use AI as a catalyst for innovation in the energy transition?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 15h15

Today, the topic of artificial intelligence is part and parcel of discussions in many sectors of society and the economy: image and speech recognition, machine translation, image generation, etc. This is in large part thanks to impressive advances in the last decade of machine learning and in particular deep learning applications. With the growing electrification of the energy mix and the diversification of generation sources— intermittent, variable and distributed—we are just scratching the surface of the potential for AI to accelerate the transition to ultra-efficient, low-emission and interconnected energy systems. New AI opportunities are fascinating and innovative, but they also raise many questions. Is artificial intelligence the best solution to accelerate the energetic transition? How do we consider the challenges of implementing an AI solution, such as robustness, bias and explainability, in order to avoid the potential lack of trust that is difficult to offset a posteriori? How do we set up a certification process for AI solutions to allow them to be used in highly regulated environments? How do we optimize the energy and resources used by AI itself, for learning and data storage, as we strive to meet climate change challenges?

Paul Gagnon Paul Gagnon
Assistant General Counsel

Paul is Assistant General Counsel with Taiga, a manufacturer of electric off-road vehicles and pioneer of the electrification of powersports. Member of the Quebec Bar, Paul also holds a Masters in biotechnology and law (Université de Sherbrooke) and a Masters in intellectual property law and competition law (MIPLC - Max-Planck). In 2020, Paul was listed in the IAM300 as one of the top 300 IP strategists in the world. Co-author of the Montreal Data License, Paul regularly gives conferences dealing with legal issues arising from AI, data licensing and intellectual property.


Conference : Are lawyers and regulators too focused on AI models?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 16h45 - 17h30 — Amphi mauve

The pace of regulation and legal commentary on AI has been accelerating non-stop for the last few years, but the bulk of that attention has focused on the front end of the value chain - namely models and outputs. We will discuss areas that are still overlooked, the consequences this could have and what practitioners can do to fill those gaps. For instance, the fact that open source licenses don’t properly address important issues when making data (or data labels) available to the public, that data prep/engineering is overlooked in AI contracting and that regulatory oversight has largely failed to focus on the key phases of the AI pipeline.

Philipp Kellmeyer Philipp Kellmeyer
Neurologist

Dr. Kellmeyer is a neurologist at the University Medical Center Freiburg where he heads the Neuroethics and AI Ethics Lab at the Department of Neurosurgery. He studied human medicine in Heidelberg and Zurich and received a Master of Philosophy from the University of Cambridge. As a neuroscientist he works in the fields of neuroimaging and translational neurotechnology, in particular the clinical application AI systems. He is a scientific member of the BrainLinks-BrainTools cluster of excellence at the University of Freiburg and Research Fellow at the Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies (FRIAS) in the “Responsible Artificial Intelligence” research group. In his research at the intersection of neuroethics, digital ethics and AI ethics, he works on ethical, legal, social and political challenges of human-technology interaction, particularly regarding neurotechnology, big data, artificial intelligence and XR technologies in medicine and biomedical research. He is also an affiliate of the Institute for Biomedical Ethics and History of Medicine at the University of Zurich, where he also teaches biomedical ethics. Since November 2020, he is a member of the Board of Directors of the International Neuroethics Society (INS).


Conference : Will medical artificial intelligence contribute to human flourishing?
Friday 6 may 2022, 13h - 13h45 — Amphi orange

The immense innovation dynamics of AI and its application in medicine promise novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. However, the primarily technology and business driven innovation of medical AI is not yet aligend with human rights, capabilities and human flourishing. In his presentation Dr Philipp Kellmeyer will examine important ethical, legal and societal challenges and present a framework for sustainable, human-rights and human-flourishing oriented innovation for AI in medicine.

Philippe Gagnon Philippe Gagnon
Co-founder and Chief Technology Officer

Philippe Gagnon is co-founder and CTO at Waverly where the entire team is working on this beautiful vision of putting AI to work for readers. Waverly is developing a mobile reading app that allows users to follow the ideas that really interest them. The Waverly community can create new ideas that are directly expressed in natural language and each one generates a unique content feed. Before Waverly, Philippe worked in the video game industry for 21 years. As a technical architect at Ubisoft, he touched almost every aspect of video games such as 3D rendering, game AI or production tools including procedural generation. What motivates Philippe is to develop innovative products using an ever-growing array of technologies


Table ronde : A.I., videogames, interdisciplinary research : key ingredients for rich & safe digital lives ?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 14h30

No-code or Low code is a technology trend allowing people to create software applications with accessible interfaces instead of having to write lines of code. In 1995, there were 31,000 web pages on the Internet. Today, there are tens of billions of pages. One of the main reasons has been the democratization of accessible tools that do not require technical skills to launch a website. Over the past 5 years, there has been a strong trend for video games to engage players as part of the gaming experience, either through user-generated content features or as as a social vector. During this time, the industry has learned how to make the most of deep learning or reinforcement learning to assist game creators or open up new gaming experiences. Over the past 5 years, most work on AI has focused on creating sophisticated algorithms based on existing datasets. These algorithms have reached a level of maturity that unlocks the possibility of creating new behaviors based solely on data engineering. Virtual worlds have been a playground of choice to develop and refine A.I. before applying it into the real world. Over the past 5 years, the academic community has become increasingly aware of the importance of interdisciplinary research, with landmark achievements such as the creation of OBVIA (International Observatory on the Societal Impacts of AI and digital) in 2019 or the grant AUDACE from FRQ which promotes interdisciplinary research in 2017. The video game industry is the perfect example of an interdisciplinary activity, because a video game is the alchemy of design, programming, art, social sciences, etc. What if AI & video games reinforced there bounds within a mature interdisciplinary ecosystem? What if state of the art in A.I. and the know-how of the video game industry offered more accessible content creation tools to populate rich open virtual worlds? What if this was the next evolution for AI and video games? Montreal, the province of Quebec and Canada have long relied on these disciplines. What if when and where he should be here, now?

Philippe Goulet Coulombe Philippe Goulet Coulombe
Professor of Economics

Philippe Goulet Coulombe is a professor of economics at the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQÀM) and is responsible for the Macroeconomic Observatory axis of the Chair in Macroeconomics and Forecasting at UQÀM. He conducts several research projects at the intersection of machine learning, econometrics, and macroeconomic analysis. In several recent works, he introduces new learning algorithms adapted to the particularities of macroeconomic and financial data, and allowing an increased interpretability in a time series context. He also conducts work on econometric climate modeling, particularly the forecasting of sea ice melt in the Arctic Ocean.


Conference : Does AI understand inflation?
Friday 6 may 2022, 12h15 - 13h — Amphi orange

In 2021, the consumer price index rose by about 5% in Canada and 7% in the U.S., well above the 2% targeted by central banks. The statistical models traditionally used in macroeconomics have been unable to predict the surprising persistence of recent high inflation readings. On the other side of the modeling spectrum, AI has the virtue of being particularly agnostic, but its opacity is notorious, making it difficult for economists and policymakers to use. In recent work, we introduce new learning algorithms that allow us to both predict and, more importantly, understand inflation. These so-called hemispheric neural networks infuse a minimal dose of macroeconomic theory so that the various sections of the network can be read and understood as fundamental economic quantities. The latter - inflationary expectations and the aggregate demand-supply gap - are essential to understanding inflation. We will see that the algorithm, in its detection of inflationary signals, discards conventional indicators such as the unemployment rate and GDP in favor of alternatives that are more sensitive to labor shortages.

Philippe La Roche-Audette Philippe La Roche-Audette
Business Development Director

Philippe La Roche-Audette is the son of a farmer - In the past, production was limited to dairy farming. Today, he is involved in field crops and organic vegetable production with nearly 3000 ha spread over Quebec and Ontario. After studying tourism at UQAM, Philippe was self-employed for 15 years. From 2007 to 2018, he successively held several positions at Agri-Fusion: marketing, human resources, and IT. Since 2018, Philippe works in business development, R&D and information technology. He is in charge of data analysis in collaboration with Agri-Fusion's teams of agronomists, technologists and farm operators.


Table ronde : How will AI and digital technologies contribute to making agriculture more sustainable?
Friday 6 may 2022, 9h15

Will artificial intelligence improve the performance of agriculture? How accurately can we predict environmental impacts, track organisms, or prevent disease? Robots, data sensors, and other diagnostic tools are providing more and more data to agricultural producers, but is it useful and valued? Would there be benefits to sharing data in the agricultural sector?

Pierre Fitzgibbon Pierre Fitzgibbon
Minister of Economy and Innovation

Pierre Fitzgibbon is Minister of Economy and Innovation and Minister Responsible for Regional Economic Development. Pierre Fitzgibbon was born in Montréal. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Management from École des Hautes Études Commerciales de Montréal (HEC) and is a Quebec Chartered Professional Accountant. Before becoming involved in politics, Mr. Fitzgibbon served as managing partner at Walter Capital Partners, a private Equity Firm, between 2015 and 2018. From 2007 to 2014, Mr. Fitzgibbon assumed the role of president and chief executive officer at Atrium Innovations, a company that develops, manufactures and markets value- added products for the health and nutrition industry. From 2002 to 2007, he put his skills to work at National Bank Group, where he occupied the position of vice-chairman of National Bank Financial, where he mainly acted as head of investment banking and corporate finance services. He was also senior vice president of finance, technology and corporate affairs at National Bank of Canada. Previously, Mr. Fitzgibbon also held executive positions in finance, as well as in company and business development at Télésystème Mobiles International, Chase Capital Partners Hong Kong, Domtar and Peerless Carpet Corporation. He began his career at PricewaterhouseCoopers in auditing and consulting services. Over the last few years, Mr. Fitzgibbon has served on several boards of directors, including that of Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec, WSP, Héroux-Devtek, TC Transconti- nental, Cycle Capital Management, Neptune Technologies, Lumenpulse and Arianne Phosphate. This committed businessman is involved in his community and in several organizations, including until recently, the Fondation du Dr Julien.

Pierre Larouche Pierre Larouche
Full Professor of Law and Innovation

Pierre Larouche is a full professor of law and innovation at the Faculty of Law of the Université de Montréal and Vice-Dean of Program Development and Quality. Professor Larouche is affiliated with the activities of the CDACI. He directs the doctoral option "Innovation, science, technology and law". A graduate of the law faculties of McGill, Bonn and Maastricht Universities, Prof. Larouche was a full professor of competition law at Tilburg University in the Netherlands, where he co-founded the Tilburg Law and Economics Center (TILEC), which has become one of the world's leading research centers in the field of economic governance. He has also taught at the College of Europe in Bruges and has been a visiting professor at numerous universities in America (Northwestern, Pennsylvania), Europe (Sciences Po, Bonn) and Asia (Singapore). Professor Larouche has published more than 60 monographs, articles and scientific contributions, and his work, cited by the European Court of Justice and the UK Supreme Court, has influenced the European Commission's policies on electronic communications and competition.


Conference : How can AI fit into the legal framework of a market economy?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 16h - 16h45 — Amphi rouge

When discussing the regulation of AI, it is often forgotten that AI will be deployed largely by private actors operating within a market economy. Yet the functioning of the market economy can influence both the inventive activity and the diffusion of AI, and the law already contains established instruments - competition law, sectoral regulation - that frame markets to ensure their proper functioning. Recent legislative initiatives in the United States and the European Union-including the draft EU regulations on AI, digital markets, and data-can only be properly understood if they are read in light of these established instruments. Such a reading reveals a desire to embed AI as much as possible within established instruments and to revive the functioning of markets affected by too much concentration of economic power in the hands of digital platforms. The conference outlines the consequences of these legislative choices for the discussions taking place within the AI research community regarding regulation.

Pierre-Luc Déziel Pierre-Luc Déziel
Associate Professor of Law

Pierre-Luc Déziel is a professor at the Faculty of Law of Laval University. He holds a B.A. in political science and economics from McGill University, a double master's degree in political theory and history and in international security from Sciences Po Paris, and defended a doctoral thesis in law entitled "Privacy in the Age of Biosecurity" at the Université de Montréal in 2015. He also completed a fellowship in art and architecture at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. Professor Déziel is responsible for the "Ethics, Privacy and Social Acceptability" axis of the Intelligence and Data Institute (IDI), co-leader of the "Law, Cyberjustice and Cybersecurity" axis of the International Observatory on the Social Impacts of Artificial Intelligence and Digital Technology (OBVIA), and a regular researcher at the Cyberjustice Laboratory of the University of Montreal and at the Center for Research in Massive Data (CRDM) of the University of Laval. Professor Déziel's research focuses on the impact of new technologies on privacy rights and the protection of personal information. He is currently conducting a number of research projects at the intersection of law, artificial intelligence and health. This research is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Quebec Ministry of Justice, among others.


Conference : What are the privacy issues in virtual reality?
Friday 6 may 2022, 10h - 10h45 — Amphi orange

In recent months, virtual reality has entered the popular debate. Immersing users in immersive experiences, virtual reality promises to revolutionize social relationships by opening up new possibilities for interaction in digital environments. Whether it's gaming, work, dating, school, or even interacting with healthcare or legal professionals, virtual reality intends to increase our ability to interact with others online. While the advent of this new reality brings clear benefits, it can also raise delicate questions. In the legal field, we can ask, for example, how our rights will be protected in these new immersive environments. What particular dangers does virtual reality pose to these rights? In this conference, we will look at how the right to privacy can be deployed in virtual reality environments. We will describe the emerging privacy issues that we believe are most important. We will pay particular attention to the phenomenon of personification of users through an avatar and the impacts of this phenomenon on the practices of collection, use and communication of personal information.

Pierre-Majorique Léger Pierre-Majorique Léger
User Experience Researcher

Professor Pierre-Majorique Léger is a full professor at HEC Montréal and holds the NSERC-Prompt Industrial Research Chair in User Experience. He holds a Ph.D. in industrial engineering from École Polytechnique de Montréal. His research aims to improve the user experience (UX) during learning or use of an information technology (IT), by mobilizing psycho- and neuro-physiological data generated during the interaction and allowing to qualify the user's emotion and cognition.


Conference : How does the technology user really experience it?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 10h - 10h45 — Amphi mauve

To design digital products and services that users will want to use and reuse, it is essential to understand their experience. However, the use of technology in everyday life is often automatic and even unconscious, which makes it very difficult for the user to share what they are really experiencing. Our research aims to improve the user experience by mobilizing neuroscience tools that can measure the cognitive and emotional states of users during an interaction with a technology. This neuroscientific data is a real goldmine for designers to create more intuitive applications. This conference will focus on concrete examples from projects conducted with companies here and abroad that have sought to evaluate what their users really experience through the use of neuroscience in the context of collaborative research within the Tech3Lab laboratory they co-founded over 10 years ago.

Pierre Michaud Pierre Michaud
Composer and researcher

Pierre Michaud is a New Brunswick-born composer, clarinetist and creative researcher. He has been a professor of mixed composition at the Faculty of Music of the Université de Montréal since 2012 and Vice-Dean of Graduate Studies and Research since 2019. He holds a doctorate in composition from the Université de Montréal and has completed additional studies at the Jan Levoslav Bella Conservatory in Slovakia, at the Université de Moncton, at Mount-Allison University and at the Institut de coordination acoustique/musique (IRCAM) in Paris as part of his professional training. He is particularly interested in comprovisation, performer-composer collaboration, interdisciplinarity, interactive spaces, and the integration of technology in the creative process. His works have been heard in concert series and festivals in several cities in Canada, Central America, Asia and Europe. Performers and companies include: Chants libres, Quatuor Bozzini, Quasar, Sixtrum, Ensemble de la Société de musique contemporaine du Québec (SMCQ), Susan Narucki, Shanghai Symphony, Winnipeg Symphony, CBC Radio Orchestra, Royal Conservatory New Music Ensemble, Bratislava Chamber Soloists, Slovak State Opera Orchestra, Arthur-Leblanc Quartet, Claudel Quartet, Suzie Leblanc.


Conference : Can Artificial Intelligence Really Create?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 15h15 - 16h — Amphi rouge

The art sphere, just like all spheres of activity, is not impermeable to the changes caused by the development of artificial intelligence. For some art “consumers”, this could be reduced to basic utilitarian functions such as “intelligent” propositions of films or songs on popular streaming platforms. For others, AI could possibly bring forth a certain fear of the automaton: creation machines that could render human artistic production obsolete. However, these points of view, utilitarian on one side and dystopian on the other, do not seem to consider the underlying motivation of artistic creation that would rather tend towards a paradigm of the creation of self or of a subjective representation of the world.One thing that we can be sure of: artists adapt, more often than not, to their surroundings and use whatever they have at hand. The usage of AI in creative processes is therefore inevitable. Are there reasons to be worried? Can artificial intelligence really create?

Pierre Otis Pierre Otis
Co-founder of Agrisoft

Pierre Otis is co-founder of Agrisoft, a software development and data preparation company in the agricultural field. For more than 30 years, Mr. Otis has acted as a manager in projects related to data governance and standardization. At the heart of modern AI projects, data is the cornerstone of the predictive power of Machine Learning. To achieve sufficient quality, data preparation must be done as much as possible at the source by understanding the business processes, their inputs, outputs and the definition of each. Mr. Otis assists producers and agricultural advisors in the production and use of data in order to exploit them in AI. Mr. Otis accompanies Agri-Fusion 2000, the largest organic farm in Quebec, and the Institut de recherche et de développement en agroenvironnement (IRDA) on projects of the Consortium de recherche et d'innovation en bioprocédés industriels au Québec (CRIBIQ).


Table ronde : How will AI and digital technologies contribute to making agriculture more sustainable?
Friday 6 may 2022, 9h15

Will artificial intelligence improve the performance of agriculture? How accurately can we predict environmental impacts, track organisms, or prevent disease? Robots, data sensors, and other diagnostic tools are providing more and more data to agricultural producers, but is it useful and valued? Would there be benefits to sharing data in the agricultural sector?

Pierre-Paul Vidal Pierre-Paul Vidal
Neuroscientist

Pierre-Paul Vidal began his studies in medicine and human biology at the Pitié Salpétrière. They ended with a medical thesis and a research degree in human biology. After a DEA in Neuroscience in 1981, he began a doctoral thesis in science which was completed in 1986. Pierre Paul Vidal became a member of the CNRS Laboratory of Occupational Physiology during his studies as an assistant in the Physiology Department where he began his career as a researcher and physician. He joined the CNRS as a research associate. He became director of research in 1990. He is currently Director of Research of exceptional class emeritus, Pierre-Paul Vidal is full professor at Hangzhou Dianzi University and associate professor at the University of Medicine Fra Gemelli, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore in Rome. In the course of his professional career he has created three research laboratories in integrative neuroscience: the Laboratory of Neurobiology of Sensorimotor Networks, the Center for the Study of Sensorimotor Systems and the Cognition and Action Group. He is co-founder of the Borelli Center. He is President of the expert committee for the biomedical promotion of the INSB of the CNRS, CNRS representative on the Board of the Biomedicine Agency, Director of the Sensorimotricity Study Platform of the Saints-Pères at the René Descartes University and Member of the Scientific Council of the IRME. Pierre-Paul Vidal is associate editor of three scientific journals (Frontiers in Neurology, Sensors and Experimental Brain Research).


Conference : Which quantification for the perceptual motor style in Human ?
Friday 6 may 2022, 10h - 10h45 — Amphi mauve

Little is known about how humans can adapt to the rigorous environmental requirements that have been created over the past 150 years. These new types of environment are complex in the sense that they are radically different to the environments of the last 7 million years, which have shaped the human central nervous system since the appearance of bipedalism. In this context, one is entitled to ask, can it be said that the human brain is indefinitely adapted and adaptable to human-generated environments? In other words, why would a completely artificial environment created by a biological organism be necessarily compatible with the same organism’s functioning? For example, does this adaptation guarantee that persons with chronic diseases and handicaps can live an independent and satisfying life in a complex urban environment? More generally, are these artificial environments compatible with sensory or motor disabilities, regardless of the person’s age? Also, increasingly intelligent machines are continuously being built, so what are the guarantees that operators will continue to be capable of driving them? This list is not an exhaustive list of the questions that require answers. Therefore, long-term monitoring should take place of human groups that are engaged in complex behavioral tasks, and this includes seniors. It is proposed that these groups be named “high-maintenance cohorts (HMCs).” They must be monitored to evaluate their training and, once trained, regular verification that their skills are operational should take place. HMCs should also be monitored to ensure they are not exposed to excessive stresses that could lead to depression, overwork, overtraining, burnout, or post-traumatic syndrome, which are prevalent in current society. Following this definition, it is clear that HMCs are diverse, and given the evolution of society, their number will inevitably increase. To quote a few examples, HMCs include not only seniors, but also persons of any age with chronic diseases, handicaps, those in rehabilitation, operators of complex human-machine interfaces, military personnel on active duty, high-level athletes, and so forth. It is believed that the concepts of pre-frailty and frailty are useful for monitoring many types of HMCs, with little adaptation from the original HMC definition. In my talk, I will describe how individual longitudinal monitoring (ILM) or followup of HMCs can be developed using quantitative approaches.

Pierre Trudel Pierre Trudel
Professor of information technology law

Pierre Trudel is a full professor at the Centre de recherche en droit public (CRDP) of the Faculty of Law of the Université de Montréal. He held the L.R. Wilson Chair in Information Technology and E-commerce Law. From 2018 to 2020, he was a member of the expert group in charge of the revision of the broadcasting and telecommunications laws. He teaches information technology law and is a regular columnist for Le Devoir newspaper.


Conference : Is massive data a collective resource?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 10h - 10h45 — Amphi orange

Data, as traces of activity in the connected world, is one of the key inputs to value-generating activities in the networked world. When data is used to measure mass phenomena or to feed analytical processes, it seems absurd to consider only its relationship to individuals. Data are then resources with a collective character. For this reason, they must be regulated according to the rights and obligations involved in the value-creating activities they make possible. The ability of state authorities to regulate the activities of the so-called surveillance capitalism society is partly conditioned by the legal status of the resources used in the value creation processes. Recognizing the collective nature of the collective resource that is massive data seems to constitute a condition for democratic regulation.

Raphael Zerbato Raphael Zerbato
PhD student in economics

In his fourth year of doctoral studies at HEC Montréal in the Economics Department under the supervision of professors Georges Dionne, François Bellavance and Decio Coviello, Raphael is specializing in fraud detection, mixing techniques from machine learning with economic models. The PhD is done in collaboration with a Canadian insurance company. Raphael sees a great complementarity between the predictive power of data science models and the empirical applications of economics. His previous research focused on operational risk management in the US insurance industry, again under the direction of Prof. Dionne, for the Canada Research Chair in Risk Management. Raphael has also worked with IFAD, a UN fund specializing in rural economic development.


Table ronde : Will AI invent the jobs of tomorrow?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 9h15

The current trend in university and vocational training programs is to expand disciplines and adjust student quotas according to employment forecasts. This pragmatism is certainly legitimate from the point of view of the needs of the economy and the supply of jobs for new entrants to the labour market. However, is it prudent in relation to the importance of fundamental research in the development of knowledge and its applications in societies that are evolving more and more rapidly? Can AI anticipate the upheavals in social behaviors that are constantly changing demand? Can it predict the emergence of new jobs and the disappearance of others? Can it invent a future? Can it make it inevitable?

Rémi Quirion Rémi Quirion
Chief Scientist of Quebec

Professor Rémi Quirion is the inaugural Chief Scientist of Quebec since July 2011 (reappointed twice by different governments; longest serving Chief Scientist in the world). Elected President of the International Network for Government Science Advice (INGSA) in 2021 (over 6,000 members from 130 countries). McGill Full Professor in Psychiatry since the 1980s and Scientific Director at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute from 1995-2011. He also served as Vice-Dean, Faculty of Medicine at McGill University, as well as Senior University Advisor (Health Sciences Research) to the Principal. Prof Quirion was the inaugural Scientific Director of the Institute of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Addiction (INMHA; 2001-2009). As Chief Scientist, he chairs the Board of Directors of the three Fonds de recherche du Québec. In 2020, the Quebec government asked him to chair a major committee on the future of universities with recommendations currently being implemented. Also directly involved in multiple government strategies focusing on science & innovation as well as the sustainable development goals of the UN. He has served on multiple national & international boards. During in active career as scientist, he trained over 80 scientists from all over the world; served on editorial boards of more than 15 international journals in Psychiatry, Neuroscience & Pharmacology; and published 5 books & over 750 publications cited over 50,000 times. He received many awards and recognitions including the Order of Canada (OC); l’Ordre National du Québec (CQ); la Médaille de l’Assemblée nationale du Québec; le Prix Wilder Penfield du Québec; Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada; Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences; Membre de l’Académie de Médecine de France; Membre de l’Ordre des Palmes Académiques de France; Membre du Temple de la Renommée Médicale du Canada & few honorary doctorates.


Conference : Does or will artificial intelligence really improve our lives?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 14h30 - 15h15 — Amphi mauve

In progress

Rémi Tachet des Combes Rémi Tachet des Combes
AI Researcher

Rémi Tachet des Combes is a mathematician, computer scientist and entrepreneur. He is currently a researcher at Microsoft Research Montreal, in the fields of artificial intelligence and machine learning. At Microsoft, he develops and studies new algorithms, with the goal of using AI to solve fundamental scientific problems facing humanity. His research has been published in numerous journals and conferences. He is also involved in various initiatives to study and reduce the environmental impact of artificial intelligence and deep learning. Prior to Microsoft Research, Rémi co-founded and was the CTO of AceUp, a talent management platform providing personalized executive coaching. He also worked at MIT in the Senseable City lab, where he studied the potential impact of future technologies, such as autonomous cars, on the urban landscape. Rémi has a PhD in applied mathematics from Ecole Centrale Paris and is an alumnus of Ecole Normale Supérieure de Paris.


Table ronde : How can AI applications improve the life of Quebecers and Canadians?
Friday 6 may 2022, 16h

From smartphones and chatbots to predicting how protein molecules fold, AI is a technology that is already transforming many aspects of our lives. It has already been integrated in a number of applications and we expect it to be even more present in the coming years. How will these applications change our lives? Which areas in our society will benefit most from this? Will we see improvements in the life of all Canadians or will the benefit be limited to a subset?

Sébastien Gambs Sébastien Gambs
Researcher- Protection of Privacy

Sébastien Gambs has held the Canada Research Chair in Privacy and Ethical Analysis of Massive Data since December 2017 and has been a professor in the Department of Computer Science at the Université du Québec à Montréal since January 2016. His main research theme is privacy in the digital world. He is also interested in solving long-term scientific questions such as the existing tensions between massive data analysis and privacy as well as ethical issues such as fairness, transparency and algorithmic accountability raised by personalized systems.


Conference : What are the key ethical issues and challenges in making AI responsible?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 13h45 - 14h30 — Amphi bleu

In our information society, user profiling for personalization and recommendation has become the norm. This has enabled the development of services that are targeted to the specific needs of individuals. Since then, important ethical and privacy issues have arisen. In particular, the lack of transparency about the profiling and personalization process has led to a loss of control over the collection and use of personal data. For an individual, it becomes impossible to question the decision made by the algorithm and to make him/her "accountable" for this decision. Moreover, transparency is a prerequisite in order to be able to analyze the possible biases that personalization algorithms could induce and to correct them. In this presentation, Sébastien Gambs will review the main ethical and privacy challenges that have emerged recently, before presenting the main approaches to address these challenges.

Selin Tuquet Selin Tuquet
M.Sc. student in astrophysics

Selin Tuquet is a master's student in astrophysics. Originally from France, she immigrated to Quebec to pursue her studies at the University of Montreal in 2017. She also obtained her bachelor's degree in mathematics and physics there. Her research project is about nebulae around Wolf-Rayet stars in the M33 galaxy, under the supervision of Nicole St-Louis and Laurent Drissen.

Shibl Mourad Shibl Mourad
Research Engineering Team Leader

Shibl leads DeepMind Research Engineering teams for North America and co-leads the Montreal DeepMind Research Lab. Shibl is passionate about combining best engineering practices with machine learning research to advance the frontiers of our knowledge of AI and using it to build a better world. Before joining DeepMind, Shibl was Site Director for Google Montreal, where he helped grow the team and expand its scope to include both engineering and AI research. He was also involved in local initiatives contributing to the Montreal tech and AI community. Previously, Shibl has founded and managed a number of start-ups. He was VP Technology of E-Concept, building interactive TV solutions that bridged the web and TV worlds. He later founded W4 Technologies. Then became VP Wireless Solutions for Cognicase, where he oversaw the development of banking, retail and consumer solutions in the mobile space. Shibl later founded Sequence Bioinformatics that developed genome analysis and knowledge management solutions for biotechs. He holds an Msc in Artificial Intelligence and BEng in Computer Science, both from Queen Mary College, London University. Shibl also co-founded TechAide and participated in helping startups through TechStars and FounderFuel. Shibl’s current interests include building useful AI, and contributing to making Montreal the capital of machine learning.


Table ronde : How can AI applications improve the life of Quebecers and Canadians?
Friday 6 may 2022, 16h

From smartphones and chatbots to predicting how protein molecules fold, AI is a technology that is already transforming many aspects of our lives. It has already been integrated in a number of applications and we expect it to be even more present in the coming years. How will these applications change our lives? Which areas in our society will benefit most from this? Will we see improvements in the life of all Canadians or will the benefit be limited to a subset?

Simon Lacoste-Julien Simon Lacoste-Julien
Associate professor

Simon Lacoste-Julien is an associate professor in the department of computer science and operations research at Université de Montréal, a co-founding member and associate scientific director of Mila, and the part-time director of the SAIT AI Lab Montreal from Samsung. He received the B.Sc. degree in mathematics, physics and computer science from McGill University, and the PhD degree in computer science from University of California, Berkeley, in 2009. Before joining Université de Montréal, he completed a post-doctoral fellowship at University of Cambridge as well as at Inria Paris, and was an Inria researcher in the Department of Computer Science at the Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS) in Paris. His research interests are in machine learning, optimization and statistics with applications to computer vision and natural language processing. He has published more than 60 scientific publications in machine learning, has served as an area chair for all the major machine learning conferences and is an associate editor for TPAMI, JMLR and TMLR. He received a Google Focused Research Award in 2016 and a CIFAR AI Chair in 2018.


Table ronde : How can AI applications improve the life of Quebecers and Canadians?
Friday 6 may 2022, 16h

From smartphones and chatbots to predicting how protein molecules fold, AI is a technology that is already transforming many aspects of our lives. It has already been integrated in a number of applications and we expect it to be even more present in the coming years. How will these applications change our lives? Which areas in our society will benefit most from this? Will we see improvements in the life of all Canadians or will the benefit be limited to a subset?

Sophie Dominé Sophie Dominé
D. student in Educational Sciences

Sophie Dominé, doctoral student in educational sciences at the Université de Montréal. Passionate about science, Sophie decided to pursue her professional career in education. With her atypical background (nurse, then master's degree in education in France, and now a doctorate in Quebec) and her passion for new technologies, it is only natural that she is interested in the engagement of adolescent students, particularly through inclusive practices.

Sophie Rochefort Sophie Rochefort
Deputy Director of R&D

Sophie Rochefort is the Assistant Director of the IRDA's Research and Development Department for the Resource Protection expertise pole since September 2021. She holds a bachelor's degree in agronomy, a master's degree in plant biology, a doctorate in plant biology specialized in urban ecology and a post-doctorate in forest entomology. She has been working in the fields of agronomy, agriculture and agri-food for over 25 years. Prior to joining the IRDA, she was the Executive Director of a non-profit organization dedicated to knowledge transfer for the agriculture and agri-food sector and a professor-researcher and director of the agronomy department at the Haute École du paysage, d'ingénierie et d'architecture de Genève in Switzerland for seven years. In addition, she has been principal applicant, co-applicant and coordinator of several projects in agriculture, urban agriculture, green infrastructure, functional biodiversity and impact of climate change on crop pests. She has also written numerous scientific publications, supervised graduate students and served on various committees.


Table ronde : How will AI and digital technologies contribute to making agriculture more sustainable?
Friday 6 may 2022, 9h15

Will artificial intelligence improve the performance of agriculture? How accurately can we predict environmental impacts, track organisms, or prevent disease? Robots, data sensors, and other diagnostic tools are providing more and more data to agricultural producers, but is it useful and valued? Would there be benefits to sharing data in the agricultural sector?

Stéphane Durand Stéphane Durand
Theoretical Physicist

Stéphane Durand completed doctoral and post-doctoral studies in theoretical physics in Montreal and Paris. He is a professor of physics at Collège Édouard-Montpetit and a member of the Center de recherches mathématiques (CRM) of the Université de Montréal. He has also taught quantum mechanics and relativity at the Department of Physics at the Université de Montréal and École Polytechnique de Montréal. He received the Quebec Minister of Education Award for his book "La relativité animée : Comprendre Einstein en animant soi-même l'espace-temps" (3rd edition, Belin, 2014). He received an Excellence in Teaching Award from the Department of Physics at the Université de Montréal, as well as the First Prize in the International Poster Competition of the European Mathematical Society as part of the World Mathematics Year (posters used and adapted in a dozen countries). He has also published the book " Les carnets insolites du prof Durand " (Flammarion, 2015), inspired by his 150 radio chronicles on Radio-Canada during 4 seasons. Recently, he designed a mini-exhibition on "Time according to relativity", an integral part of the exhibition "Eternity: human dreams and realities of science" presented at the Saguenay Fjord Museum in 2017.

Stéphane Vial Stéphane Vial
Philosophe du numérique et chercheur en design

With a doctorate in philosophy and a degree in clinical psychology, Stéphane Vial holds the UQAM Research Chair in Design for e-Mental Health (Diament Chair) and is a regular researcher at the Research Center of the University Institute of Mental Health of Montreal (CR-IUSMM). Professor at the School of Design of the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), he has published more than five books on digital uses and design (MIT Press, Springer, Puf). A transdisciplinary design researcher, he specializes in responsible digital innovation for mental health, and leads several SSHRC and FRQ-funded research projects on design strategies for e-mental health interventions and on the codeign of digital tools for mental health.


Conference : Is artificial intelligence human-centric?
Friday 6 may 2022, 10h45 - 11h30 — Amphi rouge

Driven by the pandemic, digital mental health interventions are experiencing an unprecedented surge worldwide and have immense potential to improve the mental health of populations. However, usage rates remain low, due to the lack of scientific validation of these tools, concerns about data privacy and cybersecurity, or the lack of human touch in interfaces driven solely by artificial intelligence algorithms. Several studies show that the low adoption of digital health technologies is due to a lack of attention to user needs when designing these technologies, despite the promises constantly put forward. It is therefore urgent to change the way digital technologies for mental health are designed by placing the human at the center of the design process, via codesign, service design and interaction design methods. These issues will be addressed through the lens of the Mentallys application, a mobile app designed to improve the experience of accessing mental health care co-designed with patient partners, peer helpers, psychologists and psychiatrists. This will be an opportunity to question, in negative, the role of artificial intelligence in the design of the user experience.

Sylvain Sénécal Sylvain Sénécal
Researcher in consumer behavior

Sylvain Sénécal is a full professor of marketing, holder of the RBC Financial Group E-Commerce Chair at HEC Montréal and co-director of the Tech3Lab. He holds an MSc and a PhD in marketing from HEC Montréal. His research interests are related to consumer marketing on the Internet and consumer neuroscience. His work has been presented at several international conferences and published in leading marketing and e-commerce journals.


Conference : How does the technology user really experience it?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 10h - 10h45 — Amphi mauve

To design digital products and services that users will want to use and reuse, it is essential to understand their experience. However, the use of technology in everyday life is often automatic and even unconscious, which makes it very difficult for the user to share what they are really experiencing. Our research aims to improve the user experience by mobilizing neuroscience tools that can measure the cognitive and emotional states of users during an interaction with a technology. This neuroscientific data is a real goldmine for designers to create more intuitive applications. This conference will focus on concrete examples from projects conducted with companies here and abroad that have sought to evaluate what their users really experience through the use of neuroscience in the context of collaborative research within the Tech3Lab laboratory they co-founded over 10 years ago.

Sylvia Gutierrez Sylvia Gutierrez
Economist

Sylvia Gutierrez is an economist and specialist in international management. Of Franco-Venezuelan origin, she has lived in Quebec for over 30 years. At the college level at CEGEP Ahuntsic and at the university level at HEC, Sylvia Gutierrez teaches macroeconomics, microeconomics and international economics in French, English and Spanish. Sylvia has also taught courses in China (CTBU, Chongquing Technology and Business University, Chongquing), Algeria (MDI, Algiers Business School, Algiers) and Peru (UDP, Universidad del Pacifico, Lima). She is a member of the Board of Directors of the Palliative Care Foundation of Notre-Dame PalliAmi Hospital.

Terry Virts Terry Virts
Astronaut

Over the course of his 16-year-career at NASA, Terry Virts piloted a space shuttle and commanded the International Space Station. Virts, a colonel in the U.S. Air Force, considers Columbia, Maryland, his hometown. He is a graduate of the United States Air Force Academy, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, and Harvard Business School. He also was a member of the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School class 98B at Edwards Air Force Base in California, and served as an experimental test pilot in the F-16 Combined Test Force there before being selected for the astronaut class of 2000. During his time on the ground at NASA, Virts served in a variety of technical assignments, including as the lead astronaut for the T-38 training jet program, chief of the astronaut office’s robotic branch and lead astronaut for the Space Launch System rocket program. In space, Virts served as space shuttle pilot for the STS-130 mission in 2010, helping to deliver the Tranquility module to the space station, along with its cupola bay windows. He then returned to the station in December of 2014, serving as flight engineer for Expedition 42, and commander on Expedition 43. Virts spent a total of 213 days space and conducted three spacewalks for a total of 19 hours and 2 minutes outside of the space station.


Table ronde : Could AI make decisions instead of the control centers or the astronaut?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 10h45

Astronauts must place total trust in the programming of their flights, which includes numerous self-checking procedures to correct itself, and warning devices to request human intervention. We are now witnessing fully automated flights with passenger-tourists with no specific skills. Human intervention is still possible, but only to a certain extent, in case of unforeseen events, and human intelligence remains assisted by AI. Astronauts are trained to eventually take full programmatic control in case of a major accident, such as a fire, depressurization, breakdown, or the impact of space waste. This has already happened. Would they blindly trust an artificial intelligence?

Thierry Warin Thierry Warin
Data Science Professor

Thierry Warin is Professor of Data Science for International Affairs at HEC Montréal and Senior Researcher at CIRANO (Canada). A former Visiting Scholar at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs (Harvard University, 2015-2017), Thierry has been an Associate Professor at Polytechnique Montreal, an Associate Professor at Middlebury College (USA) and an Academic Director at SIE-Sun Yat Sen University in Guangzhou (China). His current research interests focus on the use of data science approaches to better inform decision making. His research focuses on global transformations and challenges. His preferred methodology is data science, with a particular focus on automatic language processing techniques and Bayesian statistics. An alumnus of the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies at Harvard University, Thierry is a graduate of the Harvard Business Analytics Program at Harvard University and received his Ph.D. in financial economics from Essec Business School in Paris.


Conference : What are the business model changes of AI?
Friday 6 may 2022, 15h15 - 16h — Amphi rouge

The age of data has arrived. It is proliferating at an unprecedented rate, reflecting every aspect of our lives and flowing from satellites in space through the phones in our pockets. The data revolution is creating endless opportunities to address the grand challenges of the 21st century. Yet as the scale and scope of data grows, so must our ability to analyze and contextualize it. Drawing insights from data requires training in statistics and computer science, and domain knowledge. In this context, this presentation focuses on the emerging global technology infrastructure. It will highlight how artificial intelligence has changed the business landscape around the world. We will talk about new business models and the digital transformation of companies, what the Japanese define as the "5.0 society". In their book "Competing in the Age of AI", Marco Iansiti and Karim Lakhani highlight the importance of creating an "AI factory".

Thomas Hurtut Thomas Hurtut
Professor of Interactive Data Visualization Design

Thomas Hurtut is an associate professor at Polytechnique Montreal, and co-founder of Kashika, a data visualization design studio. His research focuses on the design of data visualizations. As part of his research, he has collaborated with institutions such as: BAnQ, Ministère de la Culture du Québec, Radio-Canada, Le Devoir, Cinémathèque, Canadian of Montreal, etc. He has been teaching interactive data visualization design at Polytechnique since 2017.


Conference : Is data visualization a science or an art?
Friday 6 may 2022, 10h45 - 11h30 — Amphi mauve

Data visualization is often the last step in the data science analysis chain. AI is no exception. Visualization is a tool that can provide insight into both data and learning algorithms. However, designing an effective visualization is a difficult exercise that is neither really a science nor an art. It is a design process. This talk will present the keys to this process, and how this exercise is unusual for engineers. This is a particularly important issue in the context of AI where data is paramount, both in quality and quantity.

Tiago H. Falk Tiago H. Falk
Professor

Tiago H. Falk is a Full Professor at the Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Centre on Energy, Materials, and Telecommunications, University of Quebec, where he directs the Multisensory/multimodal Signal Analysis and Enhancement Lab. He and his team have published over 300 scientific papers on the use of signal processing for improved machine learning applications in real-world settings. Prof. Falk works closely with national and international industry partners to assure their applications operate reliably “in the wild”. He has several patents covering sensor quality measurement and enhancement methods. Several of his tools have been used as benchmarks in IEEE Challenges and have received Best Paper Awards at leading international conferences, including IEEE ICASSP and IEEE SMC. He is Co-Chair of the Technical Committee (TC) on Brain-Machine Interface Systems of the IEEE Systems, Man and Cybernetics (SMC) Society, member of the IEEE Signal Processing Society TC on Audio and Acoustics Signal Processing, member-at-large of the IEEE SMC Society Board of Governors, a founding member of the IEEE Telepresence Initiative, and Academic Chair of the Canadian Medical and Biological Engineering Society. He is co-Editor of the book “Signal Processing and Machine Learning for Biomedical Big Data,” published by CRC Press in 2018.


Conference : How can signal processing benefit AI?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 13h45 - 14h30 — Amphi rouge

There is no doubt that recent innovations in (deep) machine learning have redefined the performance envelope of several applications. But as the old saying goes “when you invent the ship, you also invent the shipwreck.” This is also true of AI. We know that existing systems are (1) sensitive to changes in the distribution of the training data. They are also (2) vulnerable to adversarial attacks, where carefully crafted noise patterns can cause systems to fail drastically, but with very high confidence in their (erroneous) decisions. And (3) since models are data-hungry and require time-consuming hyperparameter optimization steps, they are not environmentally friendly. As emphasized in a 2019 study, training a model with 200 million parameters had an energy consumption and carbon footprint equivalent of 125 round-trip flights between New York and Beijing. Fast forward to 2022, we are talking about models with trillions of parameters, so more sustainable solutions are drastically needed. In this talk, I will showcase innovations in signal processing that are being applied to tackle these three limitations. Successful applications in the speech, healthcare, and human performance monitoring domains will be shown, thus ultimately responding that, yes, signal processing can be used to benefit AI!

Tristan Glatard Tristan Glatard
Associate Professor of Computer Science and Software Engineering

Tristan Glatard is Associate Professor of Computer Science and Software Engineering at Concordia University, Canada Research Chair (Tier II) in Megadata Infrastructures in Neuroinformatics, and Co-Director of the Institute for Applied Artificial Intelligence at Concordia University.


Conference : Does software variability affect AI models?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 12h15 - 13h — Amphi orange

AI models result from the application of numerous software tools to acquire the data on which they are based, to process these data, and to build representations of them allowing predictions to be made. Nevertheless, these software tools produce by nature inaccurate results, tainted by an uncertainty linked to their implementation. This variability is expressed at different levels of the software stack, from low-level numerical analysis libraries to model building tools, and at different stages of the AI model life cycle, from data preparation to inference. This talk will illustrate the potential impact of software variability in various contexts using examples from the biomedical sciences. It will also provide some guidelines to improve the performance of AI models by taking advantage of software variability.

Valérie Bécaert Valérie Bécaert
Director of the Research and Scientific Programs Group

Valerie is Director of the Research Group and Scientific Programs at ServiceNow Research where she leads the fundamental research teams and applied research labs. She previously held the role of Director of Basic Research at Element AI until its acquisition by ServiceNow in January 2021.Prior to joining the Element AI team, Valerie served as Executive Director of IVADO at its inception, where she worked to build the community and team while securing partnerships and funding. She was instrumental in the creation of several initiatives including the Data Philanthropy Hub and SynapseC. She holds a PhD in Chemical Engineering from Polytechnique Montreal. She began her career as a researcher and worked for 15 years in the field of sustainable development. She was director of CIRAIG, the International Reference Centre for the Life Cycle of Products, Processes and Services, and co-founder and director of CIRODD, the Interdisciplinary Centre for the Operationalization of Sustainable Development, before making the leap into the world of artificial intelligence. Her somewhat atypical background now allows her to approach the development of artificial intelligence in a sustainable and responsible manner with her team.


Table ronde : How can AI applications improve the life of Quebecers and Canadians?
Friday 6 may 2022, 16h

From smartphones and chatbots to predicting how protein molecules fold, AI is a technology that is already transforming many aspects of our lives. It has already been integrated in a number of applications and we expect it to be even more present in the coming years. How will these applications change our lives? Which areas in our society will benefit most from this? Will we see improvements in the life of all Canadians or will the benefit be limited to a subset?

Vali Fugulin Vali Fugulin
Director and interactive content creator

Vali Fugulin is a platform agnostic content creator. Trained as a documentary filmmaker, she gradually turned to digital creation and new narrativities to express the issues of reality. She creates multiplatform documentaries, video games, interactive and immersive experiences to tell stories based on the human experience and condition. During her two-year residency at the National Film Board of Canada's Interactive Studio, she directed the innovative "serious game" J'aime les patates, which won numerous international awards, including the NUMIX Grand Prize in 2016. Since then, she has created a number of acclaimed interactive projects, including SuperSymmetry, an interactive knitting platform; Ma caméra et moi, a virtual exhibition in the form of a video game for the Cinémathèque Québécoise; Le réveil des machines endormies quest en Réalité Augmentée for the Musée Électropolis de Mulhouse (GSM Project); and Tout Garni, a major interactive storytelling project with Éditions de La Pastèque. She is currently developing Traces : le processeur de peine, a project on grief in XR. IA : être ou ne pas être is her latest hybrid project: the production of a documentary series on AI and the creative direction of the digital clone that weaves the red thread of this series.


Conference : AI: to be or not to be?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 10h - 10h45 — Amphi mauve

The documentary series IA: To be or not to be questions the limits of the human being, in an era where machines are becoming more and more intelligent. Canadian science journalist Matthieu Dugal sets out to create his digital double by drawing on his personal data and using existing technologies, including Artificial Intelligence. Vali Fugulin, director of the series and creative director of the double, tells the story of the development of this virtual replica, which confronts the journalist with his own limits. What meaning can we give to life if machines can replace humans? Each advance in AI raises new ethical and existential questions; the field of artistic creation is no exception. Produced by Magasin Général for Radio-Canada, IA : être ou ne pas être will be launched in the summer of 2022. Creation of the double : MOOV.AI / Ganesh Baron Aloir.

Vanessa Henri Vanessa Henri
Emerging Tech & Data Governance Lawyer

Vanessa is a lawyer in data governance and emerging technologies at Fasken, where she works primarily with start-ups and emerging growth organizations. Named one of the 20 most influential women in cybersecurity in 2020 by IT World Canada, Vanessa also teaches crisis management and cybersecurity law at St. Thomas University's Master of Laws in Cybersecurity in Miami, Florida. She is a Senior Lead Implementor for the norm ISO/IEC 27701:2019 and a Certified Data Protection Officer. Prior to joining Fasken, Vanessa held the role of Director of Compliance and Data protection Officer at an international cybersecurity firm. She sits on the Board of Directors of Cyberéco, a non-profit organization in the field of critical infrastructure cybersecurity. She is a frequent speaker at international conferences and holds a Master's degree from McGill University on cyber espionage.


Conference : Should AI be regulated?
Friday 6 may 2022, 14h30 - 15h15 — Amphi orange

It is now established that ethics play a predominant role in the creation of algorithms or models in artificial intelligence (AI). However, AI laws and regulations are still in their infancy in the history of law, and the story has yet to be written in terms of the application of law to AI. On the one hand, commentators criticize the regulation of technology, arguing to anyone who will listen that technologies are agnostic, and therefore should not be regulated. On the other hand, recent scandals already suggest that systemic infringements of individuals' rights are possible in AI, even with de-identified data. As scandals and security breaches unfold, consumers are losing confidence in the tech industry, the lifeblood of the remote economy, knowing that fears of an economic crisis affecting other sectors are increasingly tangible. Faced with this dilemma, AI regulation appears to be a plausible solution to the problems raised by AI. But is it a desirable solution?

Vincent Gautrais Vincent Gautrais
Full Professor at the Faculty of Law

Vincent Gautrais is a full professor at the Faculty of Law of the Université de Montréal and Director of the Centre de recherche en droit public (2014 - 2022). He is the L.R. Wilson Chair in Information Technology and E-Commerce Law (2015 - 2025) and was also the holder of the Université de Montréal Chair of Excellence in Security and E-Business Law (2005 - 2015). Previously, Vincent Gautrais was a professor at the University of Ottawa, Common Law Section. He is a graduate of the University of Rennes 1 in France (Licence, Maîtrise) and of the University of Montreal (LLD, LLM, LLB). For more than 25 years, namely since his doctoral thesis, published by Bruylant (Brussels) and entitled "Le contrat électronique international", he has been interested in the interaction between law and technology (evidence - privacy - regulation - commerce - etc.). He is also a member of the Quebec Bar.


Conference : Would the law facilitate the development and control of AI?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 12h15 - 13h — Amphi rouge

The subject is fashionable. After several years of elaborating ethical principles, there is now a widespread call for these to be translated into law. Certainly, several principles would deserve to be formally recognized by law (accountability, transparency, prohibition of re-identification, social justification, etc.), even if most of them already exist. But, in the field of AI, the difficulty is less a question of substance than of institutional control. Some authorities have too limited means and sometimes, faced with the transversality of AI (privacy, discrimination, competition, etc.), consider that they are not fully competent. Also, regulation is based on technical standards and internal policies, the application of which is poorly controlled by law. In fact, beyond the problems specific to AI, this technology is a revelation that digital technology in general invites us to adapt distinct approaches to the new challenges encountered (secrecy, complexity, interpretative difficulties, etc.). Thus, rather than considering a law of AI, it is perhaps more effective to assess how the law is likely to facilitate and control its development.

Vladimir Pimonov Vladimir Pimonov
PhD in Physics

I am a student in Richard Martel's group at the University of Montreal. My main specialization is synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials. I started my scientific career in the field of nanotechnology during my master's degree at the Southern Federal University, Russia, as a researcher in physical virology in 2016. Even then, the abundance of data imposed the need to use software tools for processing. During my 2018-2021 PhD studies at the University of Montpellier, France, I was confronted with the need to solve complex-formalizable problems such as video recognition. At this point, I moved on to using AI as a tool for processing and collecting data from in situ video syntheses of carbon nanotubes, which my thesis was dedicated to. My work at the University of Montreal focuses on the prototyping of a pH sensor, which involves a combination of technical and software solutions.

Yacine Bouroubi Yacine Bouroubi
Professor

Yacine Bouroubi is a professor in the Department of Applied Geomatics at the University of Sherbrooke, specializing in remote sensing, geospatial data science and artificial intelligence. He has more than twenty-five years of experience in the field, acquired in university, public and industrial research organizations. His work focuses on the exploitation of geospatial data using machine learning algorithms, particularly by applying deep learning to the analysis of Earth observation images. Pr Bouroubi has several collaborative projects with the practical community in various themes of remote sensing, particularly in relation to sustainable agriculture.


Table ronde : How will AI and digital technologies contribute to making agriculture more sustainable?
Friday 6 may 2022, 9h15

Will artificial intelligence improve the performance of agriculture? How accurately can we predict environmental impacts, track organisms, or prevent disease? Robots, data sensors, and other diagnostic tools are providing more and more data to agricultural producers, but is it useful and valued? Would there be benefits to sharing data in the agricultural sector?

Yann Harel Yann Harel
PhD candidate in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Sciences

Yann Harel is a PhD candidate in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Sciences at the University of Montreal. After a master's degree on the affective processing of visual information, he joined the CoCoLab (Computational and Cognitive neuroscience Lab) in 2016 as a student researcher supervised by Pr. Karim Jerbi. Also a member of the Courtois-Neuromod project team led by Pr. Pierre Bellec, he has been involved since 2018 in the creation of an openly accessible multimodal brain dataset with the aim of stimulating research on machine learning. His research work now focuses on the dynamics of brain networks during complex activities such as video games or sports and artistic performance. In parallel, he is exploring various applications of neurofeedback to artistic creation, in the form of digital art installations, and cinema with the film V F C.


Conference : Is creativity the prerogative of biological intelligences?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 13h45 - 14h30 — Amphi mauve

Behind this deliberately provocative title, we would like to provoke a reflection on the role that new technologies, and in particular AI, can have on our way of conceiving creativity. Without talking about replacing artists by machines - which would produce a very boring result for us as well as for the artists - the question we are interested in is rather to better understand creativity by exploring the bridges between cognitive neuroscience and artificial intelligence. We will not simply list examples of "creative behavior" in artificial intelligence systems, although this is part of the point, but we will try to see how these systems can interact with human intelligence for the purpose of artistic production. These considerations will lead us to conclude by illustrating different forms of brain-machine interfaces that allow these interactions to be fluid, and by discussing how they can enrich the creative process.

Yohann Thenaisie Yohann Thenaisie
Neuroscientist

After three years of preparatory classes in Poitiers, Yohann joined the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon in biology. There he initiated the Vulgarizators festival, which brings together French-speaking popularization figures. It was in a popular science magazine that he discovered in 2015 the work on neuroprostheses of a Swiss laboratory of the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne... in which he started a PhD three years later! His project? Connecting the brains of people affected by Parkinson's disease to an artificial intelligence to help them walk better. In parallel to his research at the Neurorestore center, he practices theater and improvisation. In 2021, he combined his passions for science and theater and won first prize in the international competition My thesis in 180 seconds.


Conference : Why and how to connect an artificial intelligence to the brain?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 10h45 - 11h30 — Amphi mauve

A car accident. Your spinal cord is damaged, the communication between your brain and your legs is cut off. You are paralyzed. Permanently...? What if we could read your brain when you want to walk? Then we could send electrical stimulation to the spinal cord - underneath the injury - to make your legs move again and you could walk again! This is not science fiction, but a rapidly growing field of research: brain-machine interfaces. Each of our thoughts corresponds to the activation of a combination of neurons. An artificial intelligence, connected to electrical cables implanted in the brain, can decode thoughts in order to control a prosthesis. Such artificial intelligences can already know if you want to move your arm or your leg, predict if you are about to have an epileptic seizure, and even... guess if you are happy or unhappy! How far will brain-machine interfaces go?

Yoshua Bengio Yoshua Bengio
Researcher in artificial intelligence

Yoshua Bengio FRS OC FRSC is a computer scientist, most noted for his work on artificial neural networks and deep learning. He is a professor at the Department of Computer Science and Operations Research at the Université de Montréal and scientific director of the Montreal Institute for Learning Algorithms (MILA).


Conference : Can AI help scientific discovery?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 10h - 10h45 — Amphi bleu

Until now, AI has been used mainly to learn to classify, predict, etc. from a fixed and largest possible data set. But if we observe how a child or a scientist discovers the world, they explore, they are curious, they try to understand and they act instinctively (in the case of the child) or even deliberately and planned (in the case of the scientist) to improve this understanding. Some reinforcement learning methods are being developed to help the scientist to develop her experiments, taking into account that several experiments will be carried out and that the first ones will allow to acquire knowledge that will be used for the following ones. Moreover, we are developing learning algorithms that seek to represent knowledge not only in an intuitive way (which we already know how to do quite well) but in a more structured way inspired by the way humans think and communicate. By combining new technologies to obtain large amounts of data with each experiment (more than a human can easily digest), such learning and structured models and experimental design generators trained to maximize information gain, it is hoped to accelerate the process of scientific discovery in the coming years. Preliminary experiments on molecule discovery will be presented.

Yves Brun Yves Brun
Professor in Bacterial Cell Biology

Yves Brun is a Professor and the Canada 150 Research Chair in Bacterial Cell Biology in the Department of microbiology, infectiology, and immunology at the Université de Montréal. He has received multiple awards, including an Academic Scientific Achievement Award from the American Society for Microbiology, a Fulbright US Research Scholar Award, and the 2019 Murray Award from the Canadian Society of Microbiologists for career achievement. He was elected to the American Academy of Microbiology, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Canadian Academy of Health Research, and the Royal Society of Canada. He has served as Editor leading journals in microbiology and is a member of the editorial advisory board of Cell. He has made seminal contributions to several fields of microbiology using a multidisciplinary approach and often developing transformative tools, specifically in the areas of bacterial cell elongation, division, and morphogenesis; bacterial cell organization; and bacterial surface attachment and biofilm formation.


Conference : Can AI help discover new antibiotics?
Thursday 5 may 2022, 14h30 - 15h15 — Amphi rouge

The emergence of resistance to even our best antimicrobials is one of the most significant health threats facing the world, creating an urgent need to develop innovative discovery strategies to identify antimicrobials with novel mechanisms of action. Traditional antimicrobial screens have proven disappointing recently, in part because they usually rely on a single assay output and because they are limited to existing chemical libraries of hundreds of thousands of compounds, thereby constraining the discovery of antimicrobials with novel mechanisms of action. Microscopy screening operating at unprecedented speed through a combination of AI, microscopy, robotics, and miniaturization provide large, multi-dimensional datasets to inform AI-assisted image-based analysis to build a “bacterial autopsy profile” correlating chemical treatments to the gene products they impact. A resulting antimicrobial chemical AI model will be used to screen make-on-demand in silico libraries of billions of chemicals to predict a prioritized list of candidate antimicrobial compounds. Compounds with validated antimicrobial activity will be studied to determine their mechanism of action and identify those most likely to provide new antimicrobial therapeutics.

Yves Jacquier Yves Jacquier
Executive Director - Production Studios Services Ubisoft

Since he started at Ubisoft in 2004, Yves Jacquier filled many different positions related with the fast growth of the Studio: heading first online Services, he is then put in charge to develop the Production Services Studios in 2008 and make them the best of the industry by leading transformative activities such as Performance capture, biometrics or telemetry. In addition to the development of the production services activities, Yves designs the Ubisoft academic R&D strategy with two significant milestones: creation of a chair in Artificial Intelligence (Deep Learning) in 2011 with Yoshua Bengio and foundation in 2016 of the first Lab in the gaming industry dedicated to apply academic research: Ubisoft – La Forge. Since his debut as electronics engineer in the health sector, then in particle physics as research engineer at the CERN (Conseil Européen de la Recherche Nucléaire) on the ATLAS experiment, moving to telecoms and then the videogame industry, Yves has developed a solid expertise in technical innovation development Yves is also member of the board and scientific counsellor of CDRIN (Centre de Développement et de Recherche en Imagerie Numérique) and an enthusiastic scientific communicator for Ubisoft.


Table ronde : A.I., videogames, interdisciplinary research : key ingredients for rich & safe digital lives ?
Saturday 7 may 2022, 14h30

No-code or Low code is a technology trend allowing people to create software applications with accessible interfaces instead of having to write lines of code. In 1995, there were 31,000 web pages on the Internet. Today, there are tens of billions of pages. One of the main reasons has been the democratization of accessible tools that do not require technical skills to launch a website. Over the past 5 years, there has been a strong trend for video games to engage players as part of the gaming experience, either through user-generated content features or as as a social vector. During this time, the industry has learned how to make the most of deep learning or reinforcement learning to assist game creators or open up new gaming experiences. Over the past 5 years, most work on AI has focused on creating sophisticated algorithms based on existing datasets. These algorithms have reached a level of maturity that unlocks the possibility of creating new behaviors based solely on data engineering. Virtual worlds have been a playground of choice to develop and refine A.I. before applying it into the real world. Over the past 5 years, the academic community has become increasingly aware of the importance of interdisciplinary research, with landmark achievements such as the creation of OBVIA (International Observatory on the Societal Impacts of AI and digital) in 2019 or the grant AUDACE from FRQ which promotes interdisciplinary research in 2017. The video game industry is the perfect example of an interdisciplinary activity, because a video game is the alchemy of design, programming, art, social sciences, etc. What if AI & video games reinforced there bounds within a mature interdisciplinary ecosystem? What if state of the art in A.I. and the know-how of the video game industry offered more accessible content creation tools to populate rich open virtual worlds? What if this was the next evolution for AI and video games? Montreal, the province of Quebec and Canada have long relied on these disciplines. What if when and where he should be here, now?

Yves Joanette Yves Joanette
Assistant Vice-Rector for VRRDCI

Yves Joanette is Assistant Vice-Rector for Research at the VRRDCI (Vice-Rector for Discovery, Creation and Innovation at the Université de Montréal), responsible for major strategic initiatives and the deployment of the digital strategy for the University. He is also Director of the Consortium Santé Numérique. Yves Joanette is a professor at the Faculty of Medicine of the Université de Montréal and a researcher at the Research Centre of the Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal (CRIUGM). His research is in cognitive neuroscience of aging and communication, both in the context of normal aging and in the context of brain diseases, particularly following stroke and neurodegenerative diseases causing dementia. This work has always placed a strong emphasis on training and knowledge mobilization, including clinical tools. Yves Joanette was director of the CRIUGM, then president of the Fonds recherche Québec - Santé, and then director of one of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. He is a member and past president of the World Dementia Council and a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences. The excellence of his contribution has been recognized by several awards, including two honorary doctorates (Lyon and Ottawa).